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12

Some things I can think of to increase body: Milk stouts use lactose, or milk sugar, to increase perceived body and sweetness. Lactose is unfermentable by yeast and so passes to the finished beer. Dextrin malt (CaraPils, CaraFoam) will impart a nice bit of body without adding crystal-malt-flavor (something I don't like in stouts). Mash high. Try 156°+ for ...


9

You will need to add the right amount of priming sugar to carbonate the beer in the bottles. There are lots of online priming sugar calculators. In theory, you could bottle the beer before fermentation had completed, and let the remaining sugars carbonate the beer, but this would be very hard to do right. If you bottle with too much residual sugar, your ...


8

The different strains of yeast really do affect attenuation considerably. I've had split batches of 1.055 beer coming out with FGs of 1.007 and 1.014 just from different strains of yeast. (The lower one was US-05.) I've not made a beer this big, but if I did, this is what I'd be thinking. As OG increases, FG increases faster since the yeast have a harder ...


7

You want to add either all of it, or just the vodka. A lot of the chocolate flavor will get leached into the alcohol so you don't want to toss that. I'd say add it all if you're going into secondary, since you'd rack it again, or just the vodka if adding it at bottling time. A benefit of this technique is that it lets you remove any fats from the chocolate ...


7

At what temperature did you eventually mashed? Not sure how it works out with BIAB, but adding grains to a regular mash (even less volume compared to BIAB), the temperature only drops a few °C's. My guess is that if you added the grains at 80°C, you mashed at around 76/77°C. This is way too high, but 72°C is also too high. Mash temps range from 62-70C°, ...


6

I don't think you need a "different type" of yeast for this. In addition, I've found t hat using yeasts other than beer yeast can give you strange flavors that you don't really want. The key here is going to be to pitch a large quantity of healthy yeast. I'd make a 5 gal. batch of a 1.040-50 beer and use the entire slurry from it for your stout. Keep the ...


5

The problem could be from temperature, alcohol tolerance and pitching rates. While the solvent character will fade with time to some degree, it can take a many months to do so and will not completely disappear. Although I can't find published figures from Fermentis, S-04 has reportedly an alcohol tolerance of 10-11% in various forums. Your 1.111 beer gives ...


5

Addressing your sanitation questions: Coffee: One of your questions, paraphrased: Should I worry about secondary infection from coffee in secondary? I'd say your risk, much like the risk of most things brewing, is not from the water, which you can pre-boil on the stove or in the microwave, or the coffee which will be subject to a pretty high temperature ...


5

In your case, I believe you are asking whether you can bottle without adding anything and expect the beer to carbonate based on residual sugar -- on that point, yes, you do need to add some sort of fermentable substance for the yeast to produce the CO2 for in-bottle carbonation. But for the record, if we read your question literally, then no -- there are ...


5

At the 1 week stage: do not worry. If it's still there in a few weeks, sure, worry then. All sorts of weird flavours come off yeast when it's actively fermenting. For example lager yeasts can just smell plain rotten (eggs, sulphur, ick!), but afterwards you get beautiful clean beer. Forget about it for a week (or even 2), and start planning your next ...


5

An extra month of aging isn't a problem for a beer with healthy yeast stored at an appropriate temperature. It might have been better if it was already bottled, but your yeast have had extra time to eat up residual sugars that tend to make home brew a little heavy, and the yeast should have flocculated more giving a cleaner, clearer beer. The potential ...


5

You can't make something taste better if you do not know what it tastes like. Brew the beer as you have it. Taste it, determine what it needs, then re-brew the beer with new changes.


5

Kegged beer should last almost as long as bottled beer if sanitation and gas pressures are properly maintained. I don't think you need to do anything different because you are kegging it. The high ABV should allow you to store it in a keg for many months if not years.


4

The lines between the two blur a bit due to historical evolution porter was a dark raosty and smokey brew. When brewers made them stronger they were referred to as Stout porters to indicate strength. In time the two have seperated slightly enough to warrant different catagories for each. Today Porters tend to be drier with a somewhat more acrid or ashy ...


4

It completely depends on your water and how you treat it. If your alkalinity isn't very high, or you take steps to reduce it, there's no problem adding them for the whole mash. I've done that for years. But if you have high alkalinity or are concerned about your pH, adding them later will reduce those effects. Either way works, but you have to find out ...


4

The most important number when trying to balance bitterness in a beer is the ratio of international bittering units to starting gravity. This is often expressed as BU:GU (bittering units to gravity units). For reference, this posting has a more detailed explanation and some example BU:GU numbers for popular styles. Some Googling will get you some BU:GU ...


4

With that much caramel malt, I really doubt you could pass it off as a "dry stout" with a straight face. I would guess "sweet stout" would be the best fit, or possibly "foreign extra stout" (which is, frankly, a catchall style) if there's too much bitterness to put it under "sweet stout". And as Codehopper mentioned above, if it tastes like you added coffee,...


4

Looks like flocculant yeast, if you look close it should be the same color as the trub on the bottom if it is. May see them pulling off and coming to the top, but it's hard to see in a dark beer. Looks like it's still putting off CO2. All that should fall back in as fermentation finishes off.


4

Gratz on your 1st brew! Everything sounds normal. You won't see fizzy beer or champaign bubble trails. Slow bubbles and churning "chunks" is normal. The airlock can be quite active then eventually slowing to a stop as fermentation ends. The foam is krausen; protiens, hops and yeast that come to the top but eventually fall back in or make floating chunks. ...


4

If you've done all that, I don't think you need to worry about bottle bombs. Lacto and malto are non-fermentable, long sugars which give this beer its body. And that is what is expected in this beer style. I'd bottle it.


4

Well, kind of....WY1056, WLP001 and US-05 all had the same original source, but through time and the process of drying 05, they've diverged a bit. 1056 and 001 are very clean, with the main differences being mouthfeel. US-05 is not as clean and has a tendency to throw a peach/apricot ester that I and others find disagreeable. But it's pretty much as close ...


4

If you don't have a secondary then, feel free to add them to your primary. You don't really have to worry much about making additions in your primary, I have done it many times in the past when I lacked a spare FV to use as secondary, and suffered no ill effects. You may just have to add a little more of any flavourings you are adding as some of the flavour ...


4

No. I'm not aware of cacao nibs having any enzyme inhibiting abilities. Either something else caused a less fermentable wort. Ie higher temp or low beta-amylase in malt. Or, something caused yeast to give up on an otherwise fermentable wort. Stress, low nutrients, low oxygen, low pitch etc. Edit: looking closer at the recipe I would NOT put a 1.015 ...


3

Bear in mind this is for oak cubes, but I've heard a good starting point is between one to two ounces for at least two to three weeks. The lower the amount, the less oak flavor you'll get in a longer amount of time. The more oak you add, the more oak flavor you'll get in a less amount of time. Cubes have more surface area (therefor less contact with the ...


3

) The rule of thumb is 1 lb. of fruit per gal. of beer. For best results, freeze and thaw them first to break down the cell walls and extract more flavor. 2.) Nope, no extra yeast needed. 3.) Sure, it'll carb fine. Use whatever amount of priming sugar works for you. The cherries will have no effect on that.


3

A watery aftertaste can come from several sources: Simply too little malt or bittering hops in the beer, for example, you used kit that contains a lot of sugar rather than malt, the back end of the beer can taste watery, simply because there is nothing to provide any aftertaste. Insufficient salts - water salts affect the taste of the beer including the ...


3

In a nutshell, it's to do with strength. Just to contra the downvote, Brad Smith, author of beersmith has blogged about porter, and links to several recipes. I've looked over the recipes, and the darker ones could easily be taken as stout recipes, and the lighter ones, brown ale recipes. I remember the guide telling at the Dublin Guinness brewery that they ...


3

Bitterness in a big stout is more than just the IBUs from hops. There is going to be a contribution of perceived bitterness from the roasted malts as well. Sometimes hopping a big roasty beer to a certain IBU value will result in a beer that is too bitter because the IBU calculation doesn't account for that roast malt contribution. This phenomenon is ...


3

Pretty much any stout recipe can be turned around in that amount of time. I'd shoot for a gravity around 1.040, something in the 4-5% abv range, ferment for a week with properly-rehydrated dry yeast, then bottle and let condition for 2 weeks. As for the recipe, I like something like (for a 5gl batch): 50% pilsner (3 lbs) 20% dark munich (1.25lbs) 8% ...


3

This peaked my interest awhile back, there are a lot of articles of big breweries doing this Unicorn of brewing. From what I've found it's really expensive to do right (without chemical color stripping). My research lead me to an experiment for extracting coffee flavor but not color. The trick is to basically rinse off the oils from ground coffee (espresso ...


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