18

...and after pitching yeast (6 hours), noticed yellow clusters of what I think was mold Mold isn't going to grow within 6 hours of chilling down the wort. What you saw was clumps of yeast from your pitch stuck to the sides of the fermentor or floating on top. Did you rehydrate your yeast (if using dry)? What I'm getting at is can mold cause slowing of ...


12

Just before you add yeast. Your wort will not be heated again Wort is full of nutrients, fullest it was or will be Temperature is optimal for microbiological growth No competition with other microbes No alcohol yet Everything that has contact with wort before yeast kick in are most crucial. For full bodied, weak beers and ales, bottling is in my opinion ...


10

I'd put my money on the wooden spoon. Legend is that in days of yore, brewers used to stir the wort with a "magic stick". If they didn't, it wouldn't ferment. The reason was the yeast imbedded in the wood. I've always been told not to use wooden spoons post boil. That makes sense to me.


9

TL; DR; You need to clean! You do this for safety, repeatability, and to avoid wasting your effort. I have cleaned poorly before and wasted brews of both wine and beer, since I took a more rigorous approach I have only had 1 contaminated brew in 13 years, and that was using kit and sanitiser that were not my own. Even if you are making a wild brew you need ...


8

I've done intentional Brett brewing, and also have a friend who has a very persistent strain of Brett somewhere in her brewhouse that is popping up in all her beers. When young, Brett can taste kind of fruity (but not like normal ale yeast fruitiness) and starts to develop of flavor that kind of reminds me of vomit, but its not as bad as it sounds. Just kind ...


8

The best way to get the turkey baster out with the least consequences on your wort is to wait until the beer is finished fermenting, and then just dump it out after the beer has been racked away. Whatever contamination was going to happen has already happened (hopefully you sanitized the turkey baster). Trying to fish out the turkey baster is going to be ...


7

Beer is quite a harsh environment for bacterial contaminants. It's quite acidic pH <= 4.5, and of course alcoholic. So you have to dump a lot of bacteria in there to make a difference at this stage. A clean bottling wand with smooth sides harbours little bacteria. For peace of mind next time, you can sanitize the whole wand - just turn the wand around ...


6

Botulism toxin is the only "infection" I've heard about in the brewing community that would be potentially hazardous, but it's only a concern for canning wort. If you're not growing yeast starters in home-canned wort, it's non-issue. And even if you are, the topic is often debated. As I understand it (and I'm definitely no expert), the problem is that ...


6

Oh, if only you were 28, then I'd all be fine. Just kidding. I'd be surprised if this accident noticeably affects the beer, regardless of your age or state of health. Beer is a pretty unpleasant place for most bacteria, and that combined with the yeast activity in the bottle that scavenges any available oxygen, and the bacteriostatic nature of the beta ...


6

As jsled says you have no worries. You are doing the right things, not touching it or putting it down. If just for a few seconds to check on the brew you'll be fine, also you will gain experience regarding how your brew evolves over time. You should not worry as you are not setting it down for it to pick up bacterial contamination. Yes there is a tiny ...


6

QUICK TIP: Did you check with a hydrometer before you pitched? The golden rule with determining fermentation is "Trust your hydrometer; Almost everything else will lie to you" - Bubbling airlock and foam on the top of the wort can all have other causes, while a drop in specific gravity is only caused by conversion of the sugars in the wort to alcohol. ...


6

I have had something similar, I was brewing a Bohemian Pilsner Ale and the yeast formed tennis ball sized clumps on the top of the beer! I freaked out! But I recited the Papazian mantra and kegged the beer. That beer ended up being one my best beers ever. Some yeasts (S04 in my case) sometimes flocculate, but in the process still have so much CO2 that they ...


6

Your beer will probably be fine. Yes, your arm probably left some bacteria in the wort, but the wort is also picking up a few bacteria from the air. Cooled wort has some bacteria and/or wild yeast. But if those numbers are few compared to the number of yeast cells, then the yeast will start eating, creating an environment less friendly to bacteria. The ...


6

I've read in a few places not to do this as it risks contamination. I do it every time using a well-sanitized thief. I have never had an issue doing this. Does it increase the risk of contamination? Sure. Is it so risky as to avoid? Not to me.


6

Do not return samples to the batch. Risk of infection is very high. Sacrificing this small amount of wort makes life easier and give peace of mind. sample tubes are difficult to clean. Many are two part and need the base removed to clean properly, and sometimes take effort to reseal. samples often need to sit awhile to get to a good temp and to degas. All ...


6

They're possibly weevils. The one in the middle looks like it has a long 'snout' that weevils tend to have.


5

Looks OK to me. What you're seeing is a combination of CO2 coming out of solution, hop trub, and coagulated proteins. Relax, don't worry, have a homebrew.


5

So, I had a 1600ml starter for my lager and it took off aggressively. I had to put a blow-off tube on my flask. I let the tube drop into about 3 inches of star-San. When the starter was all done, I had a good quarter inch of yeasties in the star-San. I have read all over these forums that that yeast would be useless. It was soaking in the star-San for 3 days....


5

In the Middle Ages, they used to do things like add chicken broth to beer, I kid you not (I ran into a few recipes at one point). Alcohol itself tends to retard pathogens and if you aren't adding this sort of thing to your beer it is unlikely that you will get the right kind of pathogens growing to make you sick anyway. Also there are a lot of places today ...


5

At first when I looked at it, I thought the bright white stuff you mentioned was actually glare from the lights with the distortion of the carboy, and that you were talking about the raspberries, which have since lost most of their color and look more like brains, if anything. Now that I know what you're talking about, that is definitely mold/bacteria, with ...


5

Smell: Smells like beer. Look: Looks like beer. Taste: Tastes like beer. Verdict: It's beer! I think the issue here was paranoia of using a new sanitiser and tech. The Krausen looked to me like colony of 'something' floating on clear head, instead of all the foam looking brown and Krausen like.


5

Contamination('infection') will usually make a ring right at the surface of the wort/must etc. Anything above the liquid would have come from the initial fermentation foam (or maybe from getting something in the neck of the bottling when filling, such as dry yeast). Mead will generate a little foam at the beginnning, so it's probably nothing to worry about. ...


5

Fruit fly eggs are yellow 1/2mm long and will generally hatch into larvae in ~30Hours, so if they are still there 2 days later then they are specks of stuff, if the hatch then they are larvae, which will likely fall into the liquid and drown. I hope that helps you. Edit: Oh, also CO2 tend to put the fruit flies to sleep, so if they were to fly into the ...


5

Reboiling will increase bitterness of all the hops that went in 'late' in the kettle. Obviously, as you said you'll lose your aroma charge will decrease in proportion to the length of the reboil. You may likely increase the maillard profile of the malt character depending on how long you boil. The complexity of the original grist will dictate the extent ...


5

The standard wisdom I've seen is, as mentioned, that glass and metal "should" be fine but plastic is much more prone to scratching, making it a concern. Brett has a reputation of being very resilient and being able to survive in small nooks and crannies of your equipment, waiting to infect future batches regardless of how well you may try to sanitize it. I ...


5

No don't boil it! Chances are you are fine at this point. Bacteria just don't hang around lonely old clothespins much. Without knowing what type yeast you pitched, I can't give a solid answer, but if you re-pitch using a strong yeast strain like EC1118, it will surely kill any new bacteria that may have been introduced. At a week old about 70-80% of the ...


4

I think that's entirely possible. At any rate, I wouldn't worry about it. I see nothing abnormal, and there's nothing you could do about it now anyway.


4

There's no risk of microbial contamination from anything you add before or during the boil. The act of boiling itself will sufficiently purify the water. Water that you add at the end of the boil is a slightly different story. For the majority of people in the majority of circumstances, adding clean and unboiled water is no problem so long as it has been ...


4

Most likely not. Don't worry about it. Sanitized marbles or stainless steel weights can be used to weigh down a dry-hop bag. Or, don't worry about it too much.


4

While some claim that the addition of hops to their beer have contributed to contamination, it is quite rare considering how hops are anti-microbial in nature. While not having any way of confirming it, I would suspect contamination on those situations occurred due to some other unsanitary practice (didn't sanitize the bag, weights, or it was already ...


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