Hot answers tagged

13

'Is this possible that beer could be brewed up somehow with weed?' Sure, in the same way you can put any sort of anything in your beers, as long as you think it will taste good. But to answer the more important question: '[W]ould you get the effects of both beer and pot both?' It would very much depend on how you used it in the process. THC, the ...


12

A lot of commercial breweries do that. Most that I know pitch a normal, or slightly larger, amount of yeast for the first batch. By the time the second is added, there has been enough yeast growth to accommodate it.


10

The best way to get started is to find out if you have a friend, co-worker, or other acquaintance who brews and is willing to brew a batch or two with you. This is ideal as you don't need to buy anything to get started -- your friend will have it all. Of course, bringing a six-pack or buying the batch's ingredients is always a good gesture :). If you find ...


9

Top tier - Sparge Water Middle tier - Mash Tun Bottom Tier - Boil Kettle The main benefit to having the vessels stacked in this manner is that you can transfer water/wort without the use of a siphon or an electric pump, everything can be gravity fed from top to bottom. Three tiers also allow you to easily fly sparge much easier than other setups (...


9

Brewing Network should be your starting point. Download The Jamil Show, Brew Strong and Brewing With Style and listen to everything from the start. Yes, it is a LOT of podcasts, but you will learn so many things! There are other podcasts on the network, but I will recommend those to start with. Topics: EVERYTHING. They cover all topics, from very basic to ...


8

I don't see any way you could know for certain. IMO, the best way to add flavoring to beer is by taste. Wait until the beer is fermented and pour 4 2 oz. samples. Dose each with a different, measured amount of espresso and taste to determine which you like best. Then scale that amount up to your 23L batch size. I do this with every flavoring I try and ...


8

Basic Brewing Radio Basic brewing, Interviews Gravity, Malts, Equipment, Quality, Everything http://www.basicbrewing.com/index.php?page=radio Episodes: 50+ Brew Strong Water treatment, Interviews, Mead http://www.thebrewingnetwork.com/category/shows/brewstrong/ Episodes: 50+ The Jamil Show Recieps, Brewing http://www.thebrewingnetwork.com/category/...


8

Adding water after primary fermentation is possible and called high gravity brewing. Yeast produce more esters at higher gravity which is a disadvantage for most beer types, but often desired e.g. for Hefeweizen. For a witbier is shouldn't be a problem, either.


7

Sorry to revive an old thread but my experience of 15 years is this - controls of the same kit, same temperature, same time, same everything except sucrose in one and dextrose in the other. Result - no distinguishable difference when drinking one of each, same ABV, only difference was that sucrose took an extra day to finish primary. Bottom line - drink and ...


7

I agree with Denny, except that I can taste brown sugar, especially when used for priming. It is very subtle and mostly an aroma, but tastes slightly different from cane/beet/corn sugar. Same is true of honey; it mostly ferments out but leaves a subtle residual flavor. I like to use brown sugar on bottle or keg conditioned stouts (oatmeal, milk) and I like ...


7

This will not work with a tea-bag or any other kind of cloth. Unless it's enclosed in a very fine membrane the yeast would easily be able to get through, then disperse and propogate in the main liquid. However, something like this can actually be done. Some homebrewers have taken a high-technology cue from industrial beer and do what's known as an ...


7

According to the American homebrewer's association, there are 3 main techniques to dry out your hops: Food dehydrator Using a food dehydrator is the easiest way to dry out your hops as it ensures air movement but does not get excessively hot. Well-ventilated oven You can use your oven to dry your hops by spreading them out on a pan. You will need to ...


7

Yes, this is incorrect. You are actually conflating a couple of things, which can be all used in combination, and all of these combinations can be true. These are flavor, fermentation and time to make. Modern lagers are light in flavor, and do not take a long time to make. The breweries don't want much stock. There are lagers which have more flavor and ...


6

If you produce the same volume of beer with more malt, this will increase both alcohol and residual sweetness. It's the residual sweetness that will give it a heavier body. A couple other things you could try that won't affect the alcohol content as much: Mash at a higher temperature. Keeping the mash temperature close to 156 F. will lead the creation of ...


6

I agree with Tobias on more unfermentable sugars (high mash temp) and dextrine malts (carapils). I'm adding a separate answer because I've had good luck adding maltodextrin. Carapils, which is supposed to do the same thing, has given me somewhat inconsistent results - that is sometimes I notice it and sometimes I don't. People tend to use maltodextrin more ...


6

I have ordered some Saccharomyces boulardii and plan to do a test brew this weekend. Going to do 5l/1gallon brew with only pale malt ~1040 OG. Will add a small amount of Perle or saaz depending what is in the freezer. I will report back in a week or 2, with the recipe and results. Reporting back... [21 Mar 2016] Apologies it has been a while, I got it ...


6

You're going to be attempting a fine line of enough yeast to consume sugars to properly carbonate the beer versus reducing sediment in the bottle. The sediment you're seeing could be a variety of things generally there are a few best practices. Limit trub and other particulate from the boil that makes it into the fermenter. Limiting trub Limit ...


6

I have had something similar, I was brewing a Bohemian Pilsner Ale and the yeast formed tennis ball sized clumps on the top of the beer! I freaked out! But I recited the Papazian mantra and kegged the beer. That beer ended up being one my best beers ever. Some yeasts (S04 in my case) sometimes flocculate, but in the process still have so much CO2 that they ...


6

The strategy for getting the most wort into the fermenter is to dump it all in. Everything, hops and everything. I don't scrape the stickies off the wall of the pot, but I tip the whole thing into the fermenter. I generally aim for none wort to be left in the pot. It will make good beer. If you're not comfortable with that, the strainer idea is fantastic ...


5

The recipe you followed is for a (mostly) non-alcoholic ginger beer (a soda/soft drink). The fermentation here is really just for carbonation. Not sure if you get Fentiman's where you live, but it's like that. It should be sweet with little alcohol, so you did it right. Adding more ginger flavor is easy - just add more ginger. I use this recipe for a soft ...


5

Something like a pale ale, either American or English, is pretty straight forward in terms of ingredients and procedures. Don't start with a lager...they require extra equipment and time. Some other styles, like Belgian beers, are a bit more finicky in terms of fermentation temp and I'd recommend avoiding them til you get more equipment and experience.


5

You can't make something taste better if you do not know what it tastes like. Brew the beer as you have it. Taste it, determine what it needs, then re-brew the beer with new changes.


5

There are a lot of products that are available. Most are a heatsink or piezo electric coolers, claiming to cool 30° below ambient. Really depends on your fermenter type carboy, bucket etc. It's worth a Google. Having not tried them I can't point you to a good one. BrewJacket is the only one that I've seen that interest me.


5

Beer smith is nice, that created of the software with the same name interviews different beer experts.


5

The release of gas when you moved it is not uncommon. There is usually residual CO2 from the fermentation dissolved in the liquid and by agitating the liquid when you moved it, some of that gas is escaping. Much like swirling a glass of beer to get more foam or aroma out of it. (For the record, up swings in temperature can also generate the appearance of ...


5

Although we need more information to be more specific, the general answer to "how much wort should be left behind" is "as little as possible". One thing you can do is pour the wort through a sanitized strainer and press the hops with a sanitized spoon to extract the wort in them. Also, once the wort is cooled down, you can simply pour it through a strainer ...


5

IMHO the most discernible difference between beer and wine is the use of grain and grapes/fruit. Beer tends to be grain based - think Reinheitsgebot. However it can be difficult to decide if cider is a beer or a wine - maybe a fruit beer? Carbonation per se seems to be no guide, as champagne is fizzy - more so than most beers. Use of hops seems to be ...


5

Yes, it is here, and it seems to be used.


5

Many websites can provide recipes. Take a look at some other posts like : Recipe websites catering to beginners? But since you already have a recipe, you just need to lower the ABV a little, take a look here: Low ABV stout recipe Basically, you can add just add little more water (15% to 25%) to your recipe to achieve lower ABV.


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