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26

The recommended cell count for ales is 0.75 to 1 million cells per milliliter per degree plato (ca. 4 gravity points.) For 5 gallons (~18.9L) of typical strength beer of 1.048, that's about 12 plato, so you'll need 1 million x 18900 x 12 = 226.8 billion cells. According to wyeast, the smackpack contains at least 100 billion cells, which is half of what is ...


19

I've been researching a microscope for the same purposes - counting yeast cells, determining viability and helping my children see the unseen. For counting yeast cells and checking bacterial contamination, 400x is fine, but for enjoying with your kids some of the prepared slides that are available, you'll need more power - 800x or more. I went for this one ...


13

I don't think the process of commercially drying yeast is straightforward - it involves a partial vacuum or a stream of filtered air to make the liquid suspending the yeast evaporate faster - and it's probably difficult to reach the levels of hygiene required in a homebrew setting. If you want to preserve yeast for a long period, 1 year or more, you can ...


12

Simply put it is not practical for the homebrewer as you need to perform the drying under sterile conditions.


11

A non dissolvable solid like yeast in a liquid does not increase specific gravity. Its like dropping stones in to a water, the water still has the same density as it did before as the stones (and yeast in your example) are two separate phases. The solids simply displace the liquid but do not become a "part" of it, as in the example of salts or sugars or ...


11

weigh your priming sugar, don't measure the volume boil it in just enough water to dissolve it for a few minutes pour that sugar syrup into your bottling bucket rack the beer onto the sugar mixture give it a couple gentle stirs with a sanitized spoon That works for me. Hopefully it will work for you, too!


10

Not to be a pessimist, but if they're not fermenting, then the yeast are continually dying. How fast they die is dependent upon how they are stored. If you want to just reuse yeast from one batch to the next, then save a quart of yeast slurry from the previous batch and store in the fridge in a sanitized container - a loose fitting lid is ideal, such as ...


10

Ideally when using irish moss, very little of it should end up in the fermentor. It's a good idea to let the boil settle for 10-15 minutes after flameout so that the moss and the proteins it's attracted have time to fall to the bottom of the kettle. But even if it does make it to the fermentor, it won't have any significant affect on the yeast: The irish ...


10

It really depends on what you're after. Traditionally, dried bitter orange peel is added late in the boil for bitterness. Dried or fresh sweet orange peel can be added late in the boil for a bit of flavor, and fresh sweet orange peel can be added to the secondary for aroma. So, you need to think about and define what it is you want the orange peel to do ...


10

BYO has a pretty good, brief article on what yeast nutrient provides for your beer, as well as whether or not it's necessary. To summarize for you, wort by itself is pretty rich in nutrient, and may not need yeast nutrient, especially if you re-pitch yeast from a previous batch (proper amounts of slurry, of course). The one nutrient that is not present in ...


10

An individual yeast cell is either dead or alive. A packet of yeast will have millions to billions of cells though. Some percentage of that will be alive, and the remaining percentage will be dead. The older the packet, and the worse the storage conditions, the higher the percentage of dead yeast. Depends on the brand of kit. Some kits use no-name yeast, for ...


9

Use leftover yeast to make pretzels! So good when their warm and the perfect accompaniment to fresh Beer. My Recipe: Ingredients * 2 teaspoons salt * about 1 Cup of *clean* yeast slurry (Fresh is Best!, but at least warm them up) * 22 ounces all-purpose flour, approximately 4 1/2 cups * 2 ounces melted butter * Egg Wash and Baking Soda for Browning * ...


9

No way. You will kill everything in your beer at this temperature. The pasteurization process actually uses lower temps, probably with less exposure time, and kills them all. And its ok to use any beer yeast to carbonation, you don't need the same strain.


9

This can work very nicely from my experience, I often use S-04 and US-05. The S-04 gives esters as you suspect and the US-05 gives a higher attenuation and a thinner body. The majority of esters are generated during the first 3 days of fermentation and the major difference of a high attenuation yeast will not really be apparent until the later than this ...


9

I advise looking at HotHead from Omega Labs: http://www.omegayeast.com/portfolio/14158-2/ Flocculation: Medium-High Attenuation: 75-85% Temperature Range: 62-98° F (16-37° C) Alcohol Tolerance: 11% ABV


9

I am calling bullshit on the first article. Does this make any sense to you? "Brewer's yeast is used to brew homemade wines and beers, while baker's yeast makes bread rise. You can't brew alcohol with baker's yeast and you can't leaven bread with brewer's yeast" This is completely wrong. They are both are saccharomyces cerevisiae and do essentially the ...


8

Bubbling really tells you nothing other than CO2 is being released. It's not a reliable indicator of fermentation. In addition, if you ferment in a bucket and have a loose seal you won't see bubbles. Aeration is needed so that the yeast can use the O2 to synthesize sterols to build new cells. Because the cell count in dry yeast is so much higher than ...


8

The different strains of yeast really do affect attenuation considerably. I've had split batches of 1.055 beer coming out with FGs of 1.007 and 1.014 just from different strains of yeast. (The lower one was US-05.) I've not made a beer this big, but if I did, this is what I'd be thinking. As OG increases, FG increases faster since the yeast have a harder ...


8

Yeast will become dormant and eventually die after a few weeks to months, but only after any food sources, like priming sugar, have been consumed. The lack of carbonation after a month could be caused by a number of things insufficient yeast - normally there is yeast in suspension after primary, but a highly flocculative strain may settle out completely. ...


8

I have been reusing my yeast for several years now. I don't do it correctly, but it has worked out for me. I would like to share what I actually do, and you can balance that against all the really great information regarding the proper care and feeding of yeast. The only limiting factor that I really care about is autolysis, as this will create formaldehyde ...


8

Yes, keep it in the fridge if you don't plan to use it in the next 24 hours. There are two reasons: The lower temperature will reduce yeast activity, reducing the buildup of more CO2. The lower temperature will reduce the pressure of the gas already in the pack. As well as these reasons, Wyeast recommend you store the pack (swollen or not) in the fridge to ...


8

Danstar BRY-97 is a great option for American-style IPAs. It starts out kind of rough, but if you give it enough time to condition, it makes an amazing beer. Fermentis Safale US-05 and Danstar Nottingham also a popular choices for American-style IPAs. You should ferment them at the low end of their temperature ranges. For English-style IPAs, you can use ...


8

You will need to add priming sugar if the beer has reached its terminal gravity with the yeast being used. In this example, despite the 80% attenuation the remaining 20% is not usually fermentable sugars. Its comprised of protein, dextrans and other molecules in solution that are largely ignored by your primary yeast strain. Lastly, reported attenuation ...


8

we can get away with re-using yeast, because Mutation isn't instantaneous, it take multiple generations to change a whole batches properties. Also bigger brewers use a "mother culture" to grow more yeast, like making a starters from the same beginning yeast over and over. In my own experience, i have used the same yeast batch for 3-4 times with no changes ...


7

This is not really a mistake but just a byproduct of the process of bottle conditioning which most homebrewers go through. The sediment is dead yeast cells and proteins that are in suspension in beer but drop out over time. You can reduce the amount of sediment by racking but unless you filter it out somehow you'll never get rid of it all. The sediment ...


7

Dissolved solids, such as sugars, increase the SG since they increase the mass of the solution without any significant volume increase. Suspended solids, like yeast, may increase or decrease the SG depending upon the relative density of the solids compared to the density of the liquid. In the case with the yeast, we know that yeast settles out eventually, ...


7

I would suggest that for each recipe you put together, to do some googling to find out what temp ranges for a given yeast are going to work best for the flavor you are trying to get. Starting off in the middle of the yeast manufacturer's range is good, I know of several strains where the recommended range doesn't match what real home-brewers are reporting. ...


7

The short answer is that you can leave it for 2-4 weeks in the fridge and pitch directly. Longer than that, and it's best to make a starter from a small amount of the slurry to avoid a sluggish start and yeast bite from many dead yeast cells.


7

Keep it in for as long as there's a large krausen (the foam on top of the beer.) You can then choose to remove it and replace with an airlock or you can leave in until the end of fermentation and you're ready to rack. If you do remove it and replace with an airlock, there is potentially a risk of contamination, but not much if you sanitize all the airlock ...


7

Wyeast 1968 is not a high attenuator to begin with - 67-71%, and has a temperature range of 64-72F (source). I think your temperature of 62F is the main culprit, especially if it's fluctuating, although there are other factors that contribute to the low attenuation. There are several changes you might consider next time: since you're using an English ...


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