8 votes
Accepted

Can I fix a higher than anticipated OG after primary?

Adding water after primary fermentation is possible and called high gravity brewing. Yeast produce more esters at higher gravity which is a disadvantage for most beer types, but often desired e.g. for ...
Fabian Heller's user avatar
8 votes

Having doubts about my first stout

At what temperature did you eventually mashed? Not sure how it works out with BIAB, but adding grains to a regular mash (even less volume compared to BIAB), the temperature only drops a few °C's. My ...
JesseB1234's user avatar
7 votes

How much do melanoidins increase gravity?

The problem is yeast, not unfermentables. Unless you made a starter, 1 pack for a 1.090 beer is way underpitching, assuming you made 5 gal. A single pack might work for 1 gal. at that gravity, but ...
Denny Conn's user avatar
  • 33.4k
5 votes
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Is my final gravity too high for bottling?

In general, you can consider you fermentation completed when you get the same gravity reading for 3 days in a row. It is either completed or stuck (I won't go on the details here, but do a search on '...
Philippe's user avatar
  • 4,806
4 votes
Accepted

Is it bad to let air into my primary fermenter?

Any way you take a sample (unless it's from a pressurized vessel with an outlet) will draw air in. As you suspect, it should be a small amount, and given that your beer A) may still be fermenting (...
Franklin P Combs's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

ceteris paribus, does mashing at a higher temperature lead to a higher final gravity?

I think there are two things to consider here: Mashing temperature: at higher temperatures you will have increasingly less β-amylase activity, even with high diastatic-power malt, and this will favor ...
Franklin P Combs's user avatar
4 votes

specific gravity too high to bottle?

If you've done all that, I don't think you need to worry about bottle bombs. Lacto and malto are non-fermentable, long sugars which give this beer its body. And that is what is expected in this beer ...
uSlackr's user avatar
  • 982
4 votes

FG too low to read

Actually this shouldn't be too hard, provided you have an accurate scale. You can simply dissolve some white table sugar in your mead and compare the reading you get with the reading you would expect ...
Franklin P Combs's user avatar
4 votes

Porter high OG with fermentation stopping at 1.030?

Seeing that: US-05 has an apparent attenuation between 73% and 77% (Fermentis data sheet) You start from an OG of 1.120 And it is an extract beer (always more difficult to attenuate) I would ...
chthon's user avatar
  • 3,655
4 votes
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What's going on with these gravities?

Your mash temp favors beta-amylase which makes a more fermentable wort. While beta-amylase denatures beginning at 149°F / 65°C it takes a little time. It's possible your thermometers are slightly ...
Evil Zymurgist's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

FG not achieved after two weeks.

Could be yeast issue or 1.024 is the terminal gravity. Yeast: Even though you had some early flocculation. I doubt this is the cause of the stall. You can try to warm it up a little and get the yeast ...
Evil Zymurgist's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Low FG due to cacao nibs?

No. I'm not aware of cacao nibs having any enzyme inhibiting abilities. Either something else caused a less fermentable wort. Ie higher temp or low beta-amylase in malt. Or, something caused yeast ...
Evil Zymurgist's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

How to calculate ABV% with step feeding

Calculate the recipe as if you were adding all the honey up front. Also take an original gravity reading with just a partial amount of honey present; if you divide the gravity points by the number of ...
dmtaylor's user avatar
  • 3,417
4 votes
Accepted

Didn't reach expected FG. Should I postpone bottling? Also: It looks weird!

That beer definitely needs more time. It's likely that the periods of lower temperature slowed or potentially even halted fermentation, and the sweet smell you describe is probably unfermented sugars ...
Luke's user avatar
  • 56
3 votes

Specific Gravities for Kombucha

My recipe 1 cup sugar (5.7 oz) 6 liters water (1.58 gal) 1/4 cup loose black tea I've never measured the OG or the FG, but the recipe calculates to OG 1.014. The reason why I've never measured the ...
Dale's user avatar
  • 3,375
3 votes
Accepted

Specific Gravities for Kombucha

Suggested OGs are around 1020-1030 from a number of forums, but people are making big 1090 OGs. Regarding FG I recall they end quiet dry as there is often only simple sugars and very little tri-...
Mr_road's user avatar
  • 6,993
3 votes

Is this final gravity too high?

Really can't say how the lactos is effecting the gravity with out the whole recipe. It's very likely it can finish out the remaining points with some time and warmth. Bring it up to 70°F and give it ...
Evil Zymurgist's user avatar
3 votes

Specific Gravity too low

Did you take a hydrometer reading at the beginning of the process, before fermentation began? If so, was the wort heavier in that original specific gravity reading? If so, you might just have ...
Henry Taylor's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Hefeweizen final gravity too high

Check your brew notes, as many details as possible are appreciated and limits the speculations in answers. Solutions differ for many causes of the stuck fermentaion. If I had to guess, it may have ...
Evil Zymurgist's user avatar
3 votes

ceteris paribus, does mashing at a higher temperature lead to a higher final gravity?

Yes, a higher mash temperature absolutely leads to a higher final gravity. Mash temperatures in the 154-158°F promote the conversion of unfermentable sugars.
jsled's user avatar
  • 10.1k
3 votes

How many gravity points will explode a bottle?

There is no hard and fast rule on when bottles will go bang. You can calculate the amount of CO2 produced in bottle fermentation from the gravity drop just like you can calculate the amount of alcohol ...
Frank van Wensveen's user avatar
3 votes

Pale Ale All Grain, FG not achieved

Refractometer does not read correctly when alcohol is present. It is important only to measure in Brix, never specific gravity. Then use the following conversion calculator to determine the true ...
dmtaylor's user avatar
  • 3,417
3 votes

Fermentation time for APA with 1.080 OG

The 17 days of fermentation is more than enough to finish fermentation, your 1.015 is a good FG. After fermentation (about 7 days more or less), the yeast will flocculate to the bottom. You already ...
Philippe's user avatar
  • 4,806
3 votes

Is my final gravity too high for bottling?

If the gravity is indeed stable, I think @phillippe's answer is good, logical advice and would be wise to follow. On the other hand, if this is a 5gal(19L) all grain batch with ~10lbs of fermentable ...
rob's user avatar
  • 1,764
3 votes
Accepted

What do you do about high cider FG?

I would probably let it sit another week. The FG only seems one point of from their range. Your temperature would have slowed fermentation but should not have killed it to be honest. I wouldnt bother ...
Lucas Kauffman's user avatar
  • 1,070
2 votes
Accepted

Can FG be higher than OG?

Did you add water after you put the rest of the stuff in the fermenter? If so you got incomplete mixing and a false OG.
Denny Conn's user avatar
  • 33.4k
2 votes

What's wrong with my gravity?

Is this a 10 gallon batch? The crystal malts are only around 10% of the grist, so I don't think you have a problem there. I would consider 78 F too warm for pitching WLP001, but I doubt that's your ...
FishesCycle's user avatar
  • 9,028
2 votes
Accepted

Why is IBU/GU a good measure?

This is a good question, and I've talked to a few people that agree. I think it's just the nature of the recipe definition/creation process (especially historically): we control most directly the OG, ...
jsled's user avatar
  • 10.1k
2 votes

Is taking the gravity reading of a commercial beer useful when trying to clone?

In short yes, it helps With a SG reading from a hydrometer and a refractometer you can get the OG within 0.001 or so and obviously the FG, both are very useful in replicating an unknown recipe. ...
Evil Zymurgist's user avatar
2 votes

Is taking the gravity reading of a commercial beer useful when trying to clone?

Obviously one place to look for any hints and tips are the various brew fora and recipe lists. Most commercial beers have a "guessed" list going on somewhere. The SG of the bottled beer (in most ...
barking.pete's user avatar
  • 5,631

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