8

At what temperature did you eventually mashed? Not sure how it works out with BIAB, but adding grains to a regular mash (even less volume compared to BIAB), the temperature only drops a few °C's. My guess is that if you added the grains at 80°C, you mashed at around 76/77°C. This is way too high, but 72°C is also too high. Mash temps range from 62-70C°, ...


7

The problem is yeast, not unfermentables. Unless you made a starter, 1 pack for a 1.090 beer is way underpitching, assuming you made 5 gal. A single pack might work for 1 gal. at that gravity, but not 5. Also, a 1.010 FG for a 1.090 beer would make it very thin and bodiless. There is no accurate way to calculate FG.


6

Measure the gravities of the brews. Since you said you've got them in buckets, I'm going to assume you haven't looked inside them to see if you had krausen or anything like that on top. With the buckets, it's entirely possible you didn't have a perfect seal on one of the buckets, so the CO2 escaped out somewhere besides the airlock. I know my first batch ...


6

Mistake 1, really doesn't matter all will be fine. You may end up with a little more bitterness extraction, but is has been reported that FWH can lead to a more mellow bitterness. I really would not worry at all. Mistake 2, not really all should be fine You would get a cleaner flavour profile if you had used 2 packets of yeast,but your yeast should be ...


5

Firstly, stop opening it, you looking at it isn't going to make anything good happen and could potentially lead to an infection. Try to get it somewhere warmer, assuming it's an ale yeast (you didn't say what type of yeast you were using) try to get it to 65-70F. Swirl it very gently a few times when it's in the warmer area to try to get the yeast active ...


5

Yes yeast will get damaged and mostly die at 110°F+ anything over 120°F will kill in minutes, at 140°F it instantly kills the yeast. Just repitch some more yeast. You'll be fine.


4

The cake is referring the yeast the was produced from a previous batch of beer. Yeast reproduces as it ferments the beer. The layer on the bottom of the fermenter is the yeast that grew during fermentation. Some people will brew a batch of beer and pitch it directly onto the cake created from a previous brew. The preferred method would be to wash the yeast ...


4

Yes, it certainly can finish that high depending on your recipe and technique. I have a bourbon vanilla imperial porter recipe that finishes in the 1.026-28 range. But it certainly won't hurt your beer to let it sit another week or so and see what happens.


4

Airlocks aren't really a great indicator as far as determining when fermentation is finished, so don't rely entirely on that. Also, Sometimes you may not see much krausen during fermentation, other times it will explode! Your delicious beverage could still be fermenting at a slow rate -- so slow that you might not notice it. This is where a hydrometer ...


4

I'd leave it overnight and give it more chance to work. Just because there is no activity in the airlock does not mean it's not fermenting


4

This is quite normal. At the end of fermentation, there isn't much CO2 production - the yeast are conditioning the beer. Also, as the temperature falls, the pressure of the gas in the carboy decreases, which causes more air to enter from outside to equalize the pressure. Regarding the increase in gravity, 1 point is well within the error tolerance, and ...


4

So, first things first, 1.130 is a pretty high starting gravity for some yeasts, and can cause some additional yeast stress, unless you are diligent with nutrients and your yeast is hearty enough to handle it. I'm not saying that this is necessarily a problem for D47, but its something to consider. The more work you expect the yeast to do, the more help you ...


4

You need to determine if you have a wort problem or a yeast problem. The way to do that is with a fast ferment test (sometimes called forced ferment test). Put some of the wort in a small sanitized container. You need enough to be able to take a gravity reading. Add a LOT of yeast to the sample...even bread yeast is fine for this since we want to know if ...


4

It's rather high for a Dunkelweizen. I'd try gently swirling the fermentation vessel to get the yeast off of the bottom. Maybe up the fermentation temp a few degrees too. Do that and try taking some SG readings a couple of weeks later and see if you have got things moving along again. I'd worry that if fermentation is just stuck (and not finished) that ...


4

1.028 is ok, but generally only if you started A LOT higher. First; try moving the fermenter to a warmer area and give it a bit of a swirl/shake to rouse the yeast. See if that helps. Second: make a new yeast starter and pitch that. leave it for a while and see if it solves your problem. Three: Taste the beer. If it tastes good, bottle and enjoy, else, ...


4

Logically, fermentation stops if either/both: a) nothing for yeast to eat, b) no yeast to eat the sugars. A. Review your recipe. If there is much crystal/cara-whatever grain, which provides non-fermentables, then FG of 1.03 may be it. Lactose is not fermentable, too, by the way, but I don't think 100g of lactose contributes to what it seems as 0.020 ...


4

Seeing that: US-05 has an apparent attenuation between 73% and 77% (Fermentis data sheet) You start from an OG of 1.120 And it is an extract beer (always more difficult to attenuate) I would conclude that your fermentation is finished. The calculated attenuation is now 75% which is nice in the middle of the expected attenuation of the yeast. You could ...


3

You moved the cider to secondary too soon. Normally you want at least 65% attenuation to have been reached. Since apple juice ferments to nearly 1.000, that would be 1.030. Apple juice is low in nutrients, which the yeast require to metabolize sugar into alcohol and carbon dioxide. I would suggest you move the cider back into the fermentor and add fresh ...


3

The picture shows that your beer is actively fermenting. The brown foam is called "Krausen" and is composed of yeast and other solids that have been pushed to the top of the fermenter by the force of escaping CO2 The most likely explanation for the lack of airlock activity is that either the bucket's lid was not properly sealed, or the airlock was not ...


3

You need to know what the gravity is to know if it has stalled. Airlock activity will not tell you this. This is documented in several other questions. For example: No bubbles in the airlock - should I still bottle the brew? First Time Airlock Won't Start Also for future reference, one standard 11.5g packet of S-04 easily has enough cells to ferment 5 ...


3

If by twin, you mean the same wort batch so it has the same fermentability, I'd let it sit a while longer. I'd also consider bumping the temperature up a few degrees and give the carboy a swirl to try to rouse the yeast to get them to finish the job. I just had the same thing happen to me on a cider I'm trying and that got them going again.


3

To fix this beer, I would raise the temperature to 55F and leave it for another couple of weeks. Assuming sanitation is good the beer will be ok. 1.7l is on the small side even for a stirred starter for a 1.060 lager, and airation doesn't provide the dissolved oxygen levels needed. (ca. 15ppm.) In future, aim for a 4-5l starter and yeast nutrient. If you ...


3

Bubbles are an inaccurate way to gauge fermentation. Can you see if the beer is fermenting? Have you taken a gravity reading? It's also possible that the temp was on the high side, fermentation finished quickly and you missed it. Look for physical signs. And in homebrewing you can almost never go wrong by just waiting longer.


3

It's much more likely that your fermentation is done, not stalled. That temp is not high enough to hurt the yeast, but it is high enough to make the fermentation go very quickly. Given that and your current gravity reading, it's \done and you can bottle.


3

If the beer tastes good, there is no reason to throw it out. You may not have any fermentable sugars left, after 2-3 days of stable gravity it usually means the yeast is done, you may bottle as it is but only if you are convinced that the fermentation is done. To make sure fermentation is over, you can adjust the temperature since 18C seems a bit cold. ...


3

Potassium Metabisulfite and Sodium Metabisulfite are anti-microbial in that they deplete a solution of oxygen which will inhibit yeast growth. But shouldn't be an issue if it was rinsed out well. Bentonite as a fining agent pre fermentation can be a yeast inhibitor and delay or slow fermentation. Bentonite effects on fermentation Your gravity is more of an ...


3

Its a tough call. Seems like you've done everything right to ensure the ferment is as complete as its going to be. I'd be surprised if you had bottling issues later on. As long as you are satisfied with the flavor that you can drink it I'd say prime a little less than normal to be safe and bottle it up. Another option would be to give it one more try to ...


3

0.004 difference is also 1 Blg difference, to say it in units I know. That's pretty big here. At the same time, it's also pretty possible your fermentation has finished. If in doubt, I would try fast fermentation test. Take generous amount of baker's yeast, fresh. Like, 1/5 cup. Fill the rest of cup with your beer, stir, put in dry warm place and wait a day ...


3

What blew out is just the krausen while it has a lot of great yeast in it, there should be plenty left to complete fermentation. Just a note. Cornmeal needs a cereal mash to expose starches and then enzymes from grain or adding them directly to get fermentable sugars on a mash. If this wasn't done then all that fermented was the 10lb of sugar, so keep that ...


3

It is not too late. In fact the bottles will condition/carbonate in a fridge (5°C) quite well but will take somewhat longer to do so. Try taking the bottles out of the refrigerator and leaving them for (say) two weeks in a warm (room temperature/20°C) place. One can shake the bottles to disperse any settled yeast if one wishes to. That should rouse the ...


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