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9 votes
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Interpreting single-infusion mash instructions with two temperatures listed

The first temperature is of the water you are adding while the second is the expected temperature of the mash after it has been added. So by adding 12.81 qt of water at 163.7 F to the grain (...
thesquaregroot's user avatar
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9 votes
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Does a longer mash time lead to more fermentable wort?

The real answer is that it depends, but it certainly can. The things to consider: Temperature affects the rate of enzymatic reaction - higher temperatures will mean the reaction happens faster, so ...
Franklin P Combs's user avatar
8 votes
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How to do alpha-amylase conversion first and beta second?

Excellent question, which I know every detail-focused brewer wonders about at some point. The reason we don't go up to alpha temperature right away and then drop down is that the beta enzyme ...
dmtaylor's user avatar
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7 votes
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Can theatre buttered and salted popcorn be used for brewing brewing at home?

Yes, yes it can. Have done so before with Pumpkin Popcorn IPA. It was really good! Salted will pump up your chloride ion count, so be aware of that, and the buttered aspect makes no real difference ...
Mr_road's user avatar
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6 votes
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Can wet crushing impede mashing?

Brewing textbooks I referred to universally state that the gap between the rollers of the mill needs to be much closer together for wet-milling. You don't mention making any adjustments, so I'll ...
Franklin P Combs's user avatar
6 votes

Caramunich 1, 2, and 3 vs. Munich 1, 2, and 3

As the other answers have stated, the malts are indeed different. As with all malts, they can vary between malt companies but these varieties are different regardless. Perhaps more importantly, ...
thesquaregroot's user avatar
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6 votes
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Is it possible for flavors from the malts to stick with a mash bag?

In practice a nylon bag can become discoloured but it rarely gets so contaminated as to actually affect the flavour of a brew. As long as the bag is cleaned of all debris and thoroughly rinsed it ...
barking.pete's user avatar
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5 votes

Is it possible to recover from mashing at an incorrect temperature by stablizing the mash temperature for a longer duration?

Specifically no. You can't mash longer at the correct temperature to correct for the 30 minutes at a lower temp. It doesn't mean the beer isn't any good but the composition of the sugars are going ...
brewchez's user avatar
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5 votes
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Step Mash Calculation

Based on what you provided. 11.76 lb grain 2.9 gal water 110f current temp. You would need to add. 3.8gal of 190°F water to reach 152°F in the mash. You need to use a mash Infusion calculator, ...
Evil Zymurgist's user avatar
5 votes

How does one make vodka from potatoes

You could start with this question from this forum to know how to turn potatoes into a sugary solution fit for fermentation. Mind you, mashing not only means to mush the potatoes, but to add crushed ...
chthon's user avatar
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4 votes
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What happens if you mash only roasted grains?

It's not really mashing if there are no enzyme present. It's just a big steep. But for the sake of argument... Yes, it's mostly starches. Depending on the speciality malt being 'mashed' in this ...
brewchez's user avatar
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4 votes

Trying to calculate my efficiency correctly

Looks like you are doing it right to me, using those calculators. The only thing that might change your actual # is the calibration temp of your hydrometer. Be sure that it is 20C. Some hydrometers ...
brewchez's user avatar
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4 votes

Caramunich 1, 2, and 3 vs. Munich 1, 2, and 3

Yes, you are correct and no they're not.
Denny Conn's user avatar
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4 votes
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Brew in a bag - mash temp all over the place

I do normal all grain procedure and the situation is the same. The biggest heat flux will be on outer diemeter of the mash tun. The better the insulation, the smaller the heat flux will be. Usually ...
Razmooo's user avatar
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4 votes

Trying to calculate my efficiency correctly

I can see that your post mash and post boil gravities are really off. For example you state an estimated post mash gravity 1.037 after correction, but then have 1.030 post boil. This would only be ...
Evil Zymurgist's user avatar
4 votes
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About reusing spent grain

I use second runnings / Parti-Gyle as often as I can. But as my primary mash efficiency rises theres less and less usefulness in the parti-gyle. As for me using the grains, it's compost or given away ...
Evil Zymurgist's user avatar
4 votes

Does a longer mash time lead to more fermentable wort?

Yes. You are correct that mash temperature is what primarily affects the fermentability of the wort, but time is also a factor. Modern brew malts convert the majority of their starches to sugar in as ...
Wyrmwood's user avatar
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4 votes

When should you treat your water for pH for a sour beer?

You are perfectly correct, the mash adjust to around 5.2 is for conversion efficiency and to assure that minimal tannins are extracted out of the grain husks (especially important in dark beers). The ...
ritterasdf's user avatar
4 votes

Step mash and under modified malts

It can help head retention and other aspects of the beer with the right grain bill, but fully modified malts don't benifiet from it. Typically a acid / protein rest is applied to release the amino ...
Evil Zymurgist's user avatar
4 votes

Should I boil apples before using them in a mash?

As you are making hard cider you just need to juice the apples then add your choosen yeast to the juice. You don't need to boil or even wash them, but you can. Many traditional ciders are fermented ...
Mr_road's user avatar
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4 votes
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The Mashing proccess

Super simple. You combine hot water and crushed malted barley for about an hour. This turns the starches into sugar that you can collect and later boil for beer. It's all covered in this Wikipedia ...
farmersteve's user avatar
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4 votes

All Grain Brewing

Yes, your thinking is on the right track. Mashing with crushed grains at an appropriate temperature (about 150 F or 65 C) for at least 45-60 minutes then draining off basically creates your own "...
dmtaylor's user avatar
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3 votes

Is it possible to recover from mashing at an incorrect temperature by stablizing the mash temperature for a longer duration?

I think you're ok. Basically you had a short beta mash and stepped to an alpha. The result is a more fermentable beer. One thing with mash, you can't get beta action if your mash starts to high. ...
Evil Zymurgist's user avatar
3 votes

What can I do with my spent grain after mashing?

all you composters. Add your trub to compost. its a great way to get and keep your compost process going. bugs love food and moisture. I actually eat some of it like cereal on brew days. Some of ...
3 votes
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Did I add too much chalk?

It's impossible to say without knowing the recipe, and your existing water etc.. It could go either way, but I'd be inclined to say you'll be fine. It does sound more than we'd typically add to a 5 ...
mdma's user avatar
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3 votes

Mash Boiler – What's a good boiler?

Many people use propane turkey fryer setups, consisting of a large propane burner and kettle. The kettle is usually around 6.5-7 gal. so it's barely big enough for a 5 gal. batch, but it works. I ...
Denny Conn's user avatar
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3 votes
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How to test mash for ion concentrations

Usual practice is to test the source water, then determine what needs to be added. There are two calculators for additions in the form of Excel file, one from John Palmer (howtobrew.com), another from ...
Roman's user avatar
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3 votes

Doing BIAB with several smaller bags instead of a big one

A brewster friend had just such a set up for all-grain brewing. It seemed to work well and the beer was fine. It seemed easier to handle the smaller bags as they were not as heavy (or so full of wort)....
GrainMother's user avatar
3 votes

Doing BIAB with several smaller bags instead of a big one

In theory this would work. The only caution would be to make sure your milled grain very well blended to have even portions of each grain in each bag. Since mixing it as a whole as once in the mash ...
Evil Zymurgist's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Doing BIAB with several smaller bags instead of a big one

I have been using this method for three years or more, starting off with four bags and then cutting back to three, with between 1.5kg and 2kg per bag. If mixing grain, I split the different varieties ...
Peter Cotton's user avatar

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