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9

The first temperature is of the water you are adding while the second is the expected temperature of the mash after it has been added. So by adding 12.81 qt of water at 163.7 F to the grain (presumably at room temp) the mixture should land around 152 F. Mashing out is an optional (though common) step that is meant to bring the mash above the temperature ...


9

The real answer is that it depends, but it certainly can. The things to consider: Temperature affects the rate of enzymatic reaction - higher temperatures will mean the reaction happens faster, so high temperature mashes reach their limits of fermentability faster (i.e. mashing at 154°F you are not likely to see much benefit from extending your rest from ...


8

You can make a flour from the grain, and follow any of the recipes listed here: Spent Grain Chef.


8

Putting 10.5kg of grain in 11.5 litres of water will kill your efficiency, unfortunately: From Braukaiser: Traditional British style infusion mashes are with about 2-2.5 l/kg (1 - 1.15 qt/lb) very thick and German style mashes are generally much thinner (3.5-5 l/kg / 1.75-2.5 qt/lb). Historically this is rooted in the fact that the latter needed to ...


8

This answer to a similar question might be enlightening. In the case of a decoction mash, the tannins are not very soluble due to the low pH. It's really a combination of high temperatures and high pH that lead to extraction of tannins from the grain husks. The same would apply to a cereal mash. The more important factor, though, is that you'd generally ...


7

No, you really don't want to boil the entire mash--that would denature all the enzymes! You'd end up with a very starchy beer. With a traditional decoction mash, you typically wait 15 minutes, then pull 1/3 of the mash (a thick pull: mainly grain plus a little wort) to be boiled. The reason behind this: what's pulled contains relatively little enzymes, the ...


7

At this point in the process, you're pretty much committed to letting the ferment continue to completion. With fruit wine, the usual course of action is to add meta-bisulphite to the juice or pulp, and leave it for 24 hours before adding the yeast. The sulphite reduces the activity of wild yeasts and bacteria, giving the brewer's yeast a head start. If the ...


7

Excellent question, which I know every detail-focused brewer wonders about at some point. The reason we don't go up to alpha temperature right away and then drop down is that the beta enzyme denatures relatively very quickly above about 150°F (65.6°C). You could look into the actual science on this but in my estimation it seems the majority of beta ...


6

First, keep in mind that Mr. wizard is a commercial brewer and his answers come from that point of view. It may not be applicable to homebrewers. Using wheat may be about the only case where using a protein rest may be of benefit. But it'a not a given. There are still proteolytic enzymes left in the malt. Due to the high protein content of wheat, it can ...


6

If you are batch sparging the rate has minimal impact of efficiency. If you are fly sparging in most certainly can have an effect, slower is usually better. Finding the balance between a speedy enough brew session and decent efficiency is a personal choice. Shooting for 75% is probably fine and some report getting better beer without pushing into the 80+% ...


6

Brewing textbooks I referred to universally state that the gap between the rollers of the mill needs to be much closer together for wet-milling. You don't mention making any adjustments, so I'll assume you didn't. Since the husk is made more elastic by conditioning, the dangers of pulverizing it with too tight a mill are eliminated, and in fact it may do a ...


6

In practice a nylon bag can become discoloured but it rarely gets so contaminated as to actually affect the flavour of a brew. As long as the bag is cleaned of all debris and thoroughly rinsed it should keep well. It is advisable to soak the bag in water soon after the grain is emptied out. If the bag becomes stained or clogged then soaking in a solution of ...


6

Yes, yes it can. Have done so before with Pumpkin Popcorn IPA. It was really good! Salted will pump up your chloride ion count, so be aware of that, and the buttered aspect makes no real difference after mash and boil, any left over fats will get taken up by the yeast. As long as you are not adding an Ounce of butter you should be fine with the small amount ...


5

Clarity of wort has no bearing on the clarity of the finished beer. Beer clarity is much more dependent on things like proper pH and mash conversion an d a large amount of flour should have no effect. My crush is very fine with a large amount of flour and my efficiency ranges from 80-85%. Based on that, it's difficult to believe your wort loss is solely ...


5

Assuming you shoot for a saccharification rest around 65°C, the mash is heating up between ~1.4 and 1.8°C per minute. You'd make it through the 45-55° glucanase/protease range in ~5-7 minutes. I can't see this having a real effect on the wort composition, and I can't think of any other reason this technique would really make a difference. I'd say you'll be ...


5

Specifically no. You can't mash longer at the correct temperature to correct for the 30 minutes at a lower temp. It doesn't mean the beer isn't any good but the composition of the sugars are going to be different than if it was all done as you intended. That being said you probably won't even notice the difference in the finished beer. Your wort may be ...


5

As the other answers have stated, the malts are indeed different. As with all malts, they can vary between malt companies but these varieties are different regardless. Perhaps more importantly, Munich is a base malt that is provided by many maltsters, while CaraMunich seems to be a Weyermann product. As for the individual differences, I find that viewing ...


5

Based on what you provided. 11.76 lb grain 2.9 gal water 110f current temp. You would need to add. 3.8gal of 190°F water to reach 152°F in the mash. You need to use a mash Infusion calculator, not a strike water calculator. You added water weight to grain weight and used a strike water calculator. Which would instruct to add 3.8gal at 170f. ...


5

You could start with this question from this forum to know how to turn potatoes into a sugary solution fit for fermentation. Mind you, mashing not only means to mush the potatoes, but to add crushed barley malt and water. The crushed barley malt enzymes will turn the potato starches into sugars. Click on the tag "mash" to get more information. However, ...


4

This is an old thread, but I cannot believe no one answered to use the Brew in a Bag method which means you mash in your boil kettle. No extra vessel needed. You line your boil kettle with a mesh bag and when the mash is complete you remove the bag and all the grain. This is how I brew every time now, and I don't have to store the mash tun any more.


4

They are 2 different things. Specialty grains will have a direct impact on the flavor of the beer, with a secondary impact on body and mouthfeel. Mash time, temp, and process will have a primary impact on body and mouthfeel and secondarily on flavor. But specialty grains and mash manipulation can have large effects on the beer that will overlap to some ...


4

If your additional 1.12 gallons of 70F water can be considered free of heating time and cost, then we just need to compare the different quantities of water being heated and the temperature they are raised through: 2.82 gallons from 70F to 212F = 2.82 * (212-70) = 400.44 galF 4 gallons from 70F to 170F = 4 * (170-100) = 400 galF (I'm using non-standard ...


4

65% is not bad. Most recipes only expect 70%, so you're not going to be that far off to begin with if you are getting 65%. I wouldn't do partial mash unless you want to. Use Beer Smith or BrewTarget and just adjust your recipe for your efficiency. Read up on how to calculate efficiency first. Understanding your volumes and gravities at each step will help ...


4

Pound for pound, Flaked oats and Steel Cut oats should have the same impact on body, flavor, and mouthfeel. Both processes begin with raw, dehulled oats. The "groats" are toasted to halt lipolytic enzyme activity that would make the oats go rancid. Here, the process diverges. Steel cut oats are cut along the length of the groat, giving that small, ...


4

Sounds like a normal healthy fermentation. You did nothing wrong. In the future you could get a piece of sanitized tubing larger enough to fit in the opening of the carboy and jam it in there. Then direct all that foam into a pitcher or bucket of water at the side of the carboy. That's called a blow off. But what you did was fine. Once the foaming ...


4

Most of the heat is usually lost through the lid in coolers. Cooler lids are not well insulated. The bodies are. This is because they are meant to keep things cold not hot. Heat rises and a cooler lid isn't designed to actually handle it. Some coolers are better than others. I have used several and found wide differences. I found that if I covered the ...


4

According the Brau Kaiser, it's acidic melanoidins. Melanoidins are composed of sugars and amino acids, and are created through the Maillard reaction.


4

This is called "vorlauf" and yes, it is traditional. That being said, it's also a highly effective way of producing a clear sweet wort. I would guess that you'd need a fairly fine filter, not just a mesh strainer, to achieve the same level of clarity produced by recirculating a few quarts of wort. The filter would need to be so fine that you'd either need a ...


4

The whole "Brew in a Bag" methodology is based on using a very fine bag to filter the wort, just as you suggest. Its certainly feasible and something a lot of home brewers do (it doesn't scale up to pro-brewing sizes).


4

I think there are two things to consider here: Mashing temperature: at higher temperatures you will have increasingly less β-amylase activity, even with high diastatic-power malt, and this will favor production of non-fermentable dextrins and hence increase the FG (at 156° you'll have basically no β-amylase activity); and High proportions of Munich malt: ...


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