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11

What you propose will work fine. You can even keep StarSan in a spray bottle (mixed with distilled water it will last months or more) and spray down the surfaces. Although due to FDA regulations they have to list a longer contact time, Charlie Talley of 5 Star Chemical, makers of StarSan, has said that their tests show a 99.9% effectiveness after a 30 ...


6

'Does that mean that wheat decreases shelf life[?]' In certain instances, yes. Higher-protein wheat can lead to haze instability (you probably don't care in a wheat beer but you might in other styles). The proteins may also lead to flavor instability, for instance in the presence of dying yeast cells (the yeast excrete an enzyme [protease] into the beer ...


6

This is what I do regularly for bottling. Start with clean bottles, fill (let's say) 3 bottles with starsan. After getting everything else ready to go, I'll start a pipeline: empty bottle 1 through a funnel into (new) bottle 4, then fill the just-emptied bottle 1 while emptying bottle 2 into bottle 5. Cap bottle 1. Start filling bottle 2 while transferring ...


6

There is a difference between new and use whiskey barrels. The reason that many homebrewers use used whiskey barrels is that a lot of the color from the charred wood inside the barrel has been taken out by the whiskey that was in there before. The other reason is that after soaking in whiskey, the inside is fairly sterile. All that booze kills the bad stuff ...


5

In the past I've generally done what the other answers here recommend: fill a bottle with Star San and pour from bottle to bottle. Works well except that it tends to foam up, making it more difficult to pour out. (But don't fear the foam!) I've also used a spray bottle, which is less foamy. Recently I bought a Vinator bottle rinser, which is quick and easy ...


5

Theoretically, yes, your beer could be drinkable after only 8 days. Meaning, nothing is going to stop you from going into bottles or kegs at the 8 day mark, and what you will be consuming will by definition be beer. Hopefully fermentation completed, and you don't have bottle bombs. Using the term "green" flavors is a very subjective term, for both ...


5

Without much detail regarding your recipes, your answer is going to be a bit shallow and lacking in detail. Regardless, here goes nothing: First off: Glass or plastic makes no difference in today's home brewing world as studies have shown plastic carboy's oxygen permeability is a non-issue compared to glass. Secondly, most Lambics' yeast contains wild ...


5

You may be interested in Wood Toxicity and Allergen Chart presented at The Wood Database. With very important warning: Just because any given wood is not listed on the chart, does not mean that it is completely safe to use. It simply means that adverse reactions have not been reported as of yet. That said, there is over 200 kinds of wood in this one ...


5

1: I year is good. 5 years can often be better! 2: Yes, rack before ageing/conditioning. Once is enough, just to take the young mead off the precipitated yeast. 3: No 4: Neither is possibly better. But you are the brewer and can adjust as you prefer. 5 No. Pasteurising is probably a bad move. Adding chemicals can be done - but why? Mead is usually ...


5

Yes the head space is important. At the very least, you need the head space to cushion fluid volume expansion & contraction from temp change.


5

I don't age my ciders intentionally. I control the fermentation so they are clean. While I have aged cider up to two years in bottles (Got lost in cooler) I prefer it fresh. My friends that do spontaneous fermentation say they take up to 18 months to melow into something nice. It really depends on how you ferment. Note: If you add sugar to boost ABV it's ...


4

When its really fresh its still a sum of its parts. Water, yeast, malt and hops. In time the flavors marry and it becomes beer. I know that sounds hokey but its the exact same thing as simmering soup. At first its just water, vegetables meat and salt. But after a long simmer its something better. Scientifically, who knows whats really going on chemically,...


4

This is purely anecdotal, but I feel like my ciders have been pretty harsh early on and have improved with time, but it was a quicker timeframe than I had expected (a few months, not years). If you ferment to dryness and don't backsweeten (as I do, I like a dry cider), it seems like the tart "green apple" flavor is par for the course, and doesn't really go ...


4

I've been brewing for 10+ years so the answer I give will be based upon experience. I have often seen beer to lighten in colour to some extent and have generally attributed this to the settling of sediments and proteins from the beer during the conditioning phase. With less sediment in suspension, light can more easily pass through the liquid, making it ...


3

For long term storage with crown corks (aka: caps), you want to keep the bottle upright, this prevents the content from damaging the seal on the cap. If you are doing long term storage with corks, you want the bottle to be left on its side, or a slight angle, ensuring that the cork is kept moistened by the contents, this prevents the cork drying out and ...


3

First I would stick with 5 gallon equipment and brew half sized batches. Barrel half and bottle the other half. Then you have side by side comparators. I don't think worrying about angel's share is a concern. With such a small barrel the surface contact to volume ratio is going to be huge. The first few batches will likely develop huge oak flavors very ...


3

Bear in mind this is for oak cubes, but I've heard a good starting point is between one to two ounces for at least two to three weeks. The lower the amount, the less oak flavor you'll get in a longer amount of time. The more oak you add, the more oak flavor you'll get in a less amount of time. Cubes have more surface area (therefor less contact with the ...


3

The yeast odour can really only come from yeast. After 10-14 days in primary, be sure to leave the carboy to cold condition until the yeast have settled out and the wort looks fairly clear. The apple/cidery flavour does sound like acetaldehyde, which can come from to short conditioning period, oxidation, or contamination by acetic acid bacteria. The cider-...


3

Most all lagers if you can lager for months you can have some great beer. Fruit Cream Ales are nice for summer, can be done as ales or lagers, often mixed fermentation with both ale and Lager yeasts. Steer away from hoppy beers as this flavor and aroma is first to fade with age. Brew these in the final weeks of your events. Malty beers meld great with ...


3

Over the weekend I kept thinking about this and I have done a bit more digging and found this article from bear-flavored.com, in which they speak about brewing with 4 different woods and discovered this company Black Swan Cooperage who make barrels and aging additions out of 8 different woods listed below: Cherry - Butter brickle, ripe cherry, fresh grass, ...


3

"Can additional sugar help yeast consume the Oxygen present in the bottle?" Yes, although in actuality yeast needs oxygen to grow/divide. So the standard aerobic action of yeast is to use oxygen and other nutrients to grow. When the oxygen is used up the growth phase is minimised. What about isobar systems with counter-pressure? yes, what about them? If ...


3

A can think of a few factors to slow down wine aging time: Quality of the must to begin with. More complex wine will age better. Higher alcool content, might preserve the wine better. Quality of cork used, the more air will pass, the quicker the wine will age. Keep the bottles cold and away from light for best preservation. Make sure enough SO2 is present ...


3

There is nothing better than glass from a standpoint of oxygen ingress. The next best choice would be PET, followed by polyethylene and polypropylene. With PE and PP the density of the material (which varies) is more important than the material itself. Go for HDPE and HDPP if you can get it, and avoid LDPE and LDPP.


3

Typically, the Hop bitterness in beer lessens over time. So, you should expect the first taste of the beer to be more bitter than the last drop.


3

The question of how much to add and how long is like asking how much salt to put into your food. It depends on the food and your taste. That's why the recommendations you've come across vary so widely. Remember that it's all about balance: the more massively bodied and flavored your beer is, the more oaking you can get away with. In an impy stout you can ...


2

You can age wines too long, but it depends on the wines. General rule of thumb for white is 3-5 years is optimal, for Reds 6-10 years with some notable exceptions being considered long term investments. For country wines, it's best to treat them all as white wines until you get a good idea of what's optimal. Your wines wont be the same as another person's ...


2

Green apple aroma is typical of acetaldehyde. It could be the result of oxidation late in the fermentation or when bottling. Leaving it on the yeast helps, as it will reduce some or all of the acetaldehyde to ethanol. References: Pico Brewery, BJCP, BYO


2

I wouldn't bother getting smaller equipment. Assuming you brew 5 gallon batches, why not just ferment your beer as usual, then move 1.3 gallons into the barrel, and bottle the remaining 3.7 gallons? I have a small 1L barrel filled with rum. Over the last 6th months, I've lost about 1/2 of it (due to seepage, not evaporation). My barrel is physically leaking. ...


2

If you're looking for a beer that tastes on the aged side, then maybe it would be ok. The bigger beers tend to fare better with higher temperatures - the darker malts act as anti-oxidants. I have a RIS that has been standing at around 70°F/21°C for 6 months. It's definitely changed without question - not as fresh as it was, but also still a pleasant ...


2

That's way too high a temp for good results. You could keep it there for a short period without suffering terrible results, but the higher the temp the faster the beer will stale. I wouldn't leave it at that temp for more than a week.


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