Hot answers tagged

19

If you've got backyard chickens, they love the leftover mash, especially if it's still warm. I'm planning to take some of the mash from my last batch of beer, freeze it in 1-quart freezer bags, and then pull it out and microwave it to feed them on cold mornings.


18

I have been brewing 1-gallon batches at home, and 5-gallon batches at a friend's house, so I have some knowledge on this point. To me, these are the pros and cons with small batches: Pros: My spaghetti pot is large enough to do a full boil. It takes very little room, all of my equipment stores in a small plastic bin, and I can easily ferment anywhere in my ...


18

The "cara" in CaraMunich indicates that it's a crystal malt. It's essentially "mashed" in the husk, then kilned to produce sugar and a glassy kernel, like other crystal malts. Munich malt does not go through that process. It's a relatively dark kilned malt than can be used as a base malt. Their flavors and uses are very different. Munich can be combined ...


15

If the sanitizer was StarSan, then you'll be fine. At the usual concentration of 1oz per 5 gallons, it's safe - even safe enough to drink. StarSan is phosphoric acid and surfactants - coke is also largely phosphoric acid and sugar, so the two are in someways similar. In a radio program, Charlie Talley, 5 star chemicals allegedly drank a glass of starsan, ...


13

You can safely dilute at any stage. Contamination is probably the biggest risk. But just takes basic sanitation practices to avoid. Oxydation: Really only an issue if 50% or more of the alcohol is present. Just don't splash, use a tube to add water below the wort surface. Diacetyl: It isn't an "infection" it's produced by all yeast during growth phase but ...


12

It will vary, but to give you a benchmark, you can use this Brewer's Friend Calculator to play with the variables of amount of grain, gravity and volume of beer. For example, if I plug in 100 liters as the volume, 1.050 as the measured gravity (this isn't really important - it just calculates pre-boil efficiency), and choose 25kg of American Pilsner malt, ...


10

I would strongly recommend brown glass bottles for bottling (hey why not ditch bottles and switch to kegging!). As mentioned there are many potential issues with reusing plastic bottles. Water Bottles are not designed to hold pressure. I keep my kegs around 11PSI. Homebrewers always recommend to be careful with naturally carbed bottles as they might become ...


10

Is your IPA in the bottles any good? Is the carbonation OK? If so, then do not do this, or you risk ruining the beer. Moving the beer from bottles to a keg introduces a great deal of oxygen into the beer, which will dramatically shorten the shelf life of the brew and possibly introduce off flavors pretty quickly. Having said that, I actually did this ...


10

Upvote on the question, and someone will undoubtedly come by with a better answer, but here goes off the top of my head: Acetaldehyde (a-cee-tal-de-hide....nobody says it right!) is a precursor to alcohol. It is an intermediate compound that is formed prior to the formation of EtOH/ethanol during fermentation. So the weird thing is that acetaldehyde is ...


10

The best way to get started is to find out if you have a friend, co-worker, or other acquaintance who brews and is willing to brew a batch or two with you. This is ideal as you don't need to buy anything to get started -- your friend will have it all. Of course, bringing a six-pack or buying the batch's ingredients is always a good gesture :). If you find ...


10

Just clean it up and replace the airlock sanitizer fluid. If you have a second airlock just prep it and swap. If not just cover with sanitized foil while cleaning.


10

It's a combination of human perception and physical science. Volatile compounds are less volatile at cold temperatures (physical chemistry), and the human nervous system is dulled or numbed slightly at colder temperatures (human). This is the same reason why the Brits like to drink their beer "warm" (not ice cold = more flavor), and why the mega brewers ...


9

To quote from http://www.wyeastlab.com/hb_oxygenation.cfm: It was concluded that pumping compressed air through a stone is not an efficient way to provide adequate levels of DO. Traditional splashing and shaking, although laborious, is fairly efficient at dissolving up to 8 ppm oxygen. To increase levels of oxygen, the carboy headspace can be purged with ...


9

Very hoppy beers often have increased foam and retention. The polyphenols in the hops bind the proteins in the beer to create fantastic foam. It's generally considered a very good thing.


9

Yes, this is to be expected and perfectly normal - when you have a half filled container of beer, the carbon dioxide that's dissolved in the beer will come out of the beer to fill the space available, so you have less carbon dioxide in the beer, and less fizz. You can try keeping the half-filled bottles cool which will retain more carbon dioxide in the ...


9

The first temperature is of the water you are adding while the second is the expected temperature of the mash after it has been added. So by adding 12.81 qt of water at 163.7 F to the grain (presumably at room temp) the mixture should land around 152 F. Mashing out is an optional (though common) step that is meant to bring the mash above the temperature ...


8

You can make a flour from the grain, and follow any of the recipes listed here: Spent Grain Chef.


8

Cooler is better, but the old myth that says that if you go through warming and cooling cycles the beer is ruined is just not true. The warmer the beer gets the more that aging is accelerated, but it's the warmth, not the repeated warming and cooling, that does the damage. And "skunking" comes from exposure of isomerized hops to light. It has nothing to ...


8

To get residual sweetness without knocking out the yeast, you add non-fermentable sugars to the wort. To add sweetness and some body in an extract brew, lactose is the usual adjunct: 1/8 to 3/8 pound in a 5 gallon batch gives a noticable sweetness. As lactose is non-fermentable, it can be used to adjust the sweetness either by adding to the boil, or at ...


8

Here is a link to an overview of sugars in beer I have brewed with multiple sugars before but never maple and I'm not certain what golden syrup is. Honey is a very common ingredient. In my uses it leaves a mild honey flavor but ferments out almost completely. I've used brown sugar and it adds a sweetness but I personally feel the raw demerara sugar leaves a ...


8

Adding water after primary fermentation is possible and called high gravity brewing. Yeast produce more esters at higher gravity which is a disadvantage for most beer types, but often desired e.g. for Hefeweizen. For a witbier is shouldn't be a problem, either.


8

Regarding contamination, if you boil the water you are using to dilute and let it cool in a sanitised pot, then add it you should avoid bacterial or wild yeast contamination. At that OG (1080) don't worry about oxygen, if anything your yeast will need more of it due to the high starting gravity. When I do 1080+ beers, I often open the FV after 24H, to let ...


7

I do not refrigerate my beer until it is ready to drink, generally about 2 weeks after bottling. I will leave it at room temperature, out of the sun, indefinitely from the time I bottle it until I am ready to drink it.


7

Relax. It sounds like fermentation is proceeding normally. The 3-inch scum ring is the krausen and is a sign of a healthy fermentation - a foam head wouldn't last 3 days. Your airlock is probably not air-tight so you don't see any activity. It's quite common - I've had this on a couple of brews. Take a hydrometer reading in a couple of days, and you should ...


7

This is not really a mistake but just a byproduct of the process of bottle conditioning which most homebrewers go through. The sediment is dead yeast cells and proteins that are in suspension in beer but drop out over time. You can reduce the amount of sediment by racking but unless you filter it out somehow you'll never get rid of it all. The sediment ...


7

Fruit is not the best color agent here - the flavor will be out of character in an Irish Red. You get the red color from a little roast barley. Take a handful of lightly crushed roasted barley (or two handfulls of whole) and let them stand in half a pint of cold water for half an hour to an hour. Strain the water, which will now be black, boil, then add it ...


7

I just co authored a book on commercial beer recipes for homebrewers. One of the recipes I got was Rogue Hazelnut Brown ale. The recipe came directly from brewmaster John Maier. They used to use Flavormate extract, but have switched to the Northwestern brand. John says it has much more flavor than other brands. Based upon their usage, 1/2 tsp. for a 5 ...


7

It's likely since you are bottling directly from your fermentation vessel through a spigot that the spigot is low enough on the vessel that it is able to pull in a bit of the yeast cake as you fill your bottles. Each batches' yeast cake at the bottom of the vessel will vary in size depending on such things as: Original gravity Proteins and cold break in ...


7

Check out the 3-part article below. It details experiments using different amounts of Clarity Ferm on different styles of beer. The findings were that Clarity Ferm breaks down gluten nearly completely - well below the "gluten free" maximums - in all beers. http://beerandwinejournal.com/clarity-ferm-i http://beerandwinejournal.com/clarity-ferm-ii http://...


7

Putting 10.5kg of grain in 11.5 litres of water will kill your efficiency, unfortunately: From Braukaiser: Traditional British style infusion mashes are with about 2-2.5 l/kg (1 - 1.15 qt/lb) very thick and German style mashes are generally much thinner (3.5-5 l/kg / 1.75-2.5 qt/lb). Historically this is rooted in the fact that the latter needed to ...


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