12

Some things I can think of to increase body: Milk stouts use lactose, or milk sugar, to increase perceived body and sweetness. Lactose is unfermentable by yeast and so passes to the finished beer. Dextrin malt (CaraPils, CaraFoam) will impart a nice bit of body without adding crystal-malt-flavor (something I don't like in stouts). Mash high. Try 156°+ for ...


4

The most important number when trying to balance bitterness in a beer is the ratio of international bittering units to starting gravity. This is often expressed as BU:GU (bittering units to gravity units). For reference, this posting has a more detailed explanation and some example BU:GU numbers for popular styles. Some Googling will get you some BU:GU ...


4

Well, kind of....WY1056, WLP001 and US-05 all had the same original source, but through time and the process of drying 05, they've diverged a bit. 1056 and 001 are very clean, with the main differences being mouthfeel. US-05 is not as clean and has a tendency to throw a peach/apricot ester that I and others find disagreeable. But it's pretty much as close ...


3

Oats, long boil, higher mash temp, Cara malts, protein rest, and unconverted starches when applied properly will aid to give that thick body and viscous mouth feel. The mouthfeel comes from medium-sized proteins and unfermentable sugars (dextrins) usually. RIS can utilize a lot of unfermented sugar, since the style allows for a lot of hops that can be used ...


3

) The rule of thumb is 1 lb. of fruit per gal. of beer. For best results, freeze and thaw them first to break down the cell walls and extract more flavor. 2.) Nope, no extra yeast needed. 3.) Sure, it'll carb fine. Use whatever amount of priming sugar works for you. The cherries will have no effect on that.


3

Bitterness in a big stout is more than just the IBUs from hops. There is going to be a contribution of perceived bitterness from the roasted malts as well. Sometimes hopping a big roasty beer to a certain IBU value will result in a beer that is too bitter because the IBU calculation doesn't account for that roast malt contribution. This phenomenon is ...


2

Although I trust BeerSmith, I also recommend running your calculations through Mr Malty. Personally, I would not be too worried. You have a healthy starter and a good number of yeast. I brewed a RIS with a single packet of US-05! If you are really worried and pressed for time, maybe re-hydrate a packet of US-05 on the side, add it to your starter, give it ...


2

Franklin P Combs and Atron Seige are completely correct with their suggestions. Google Brewers Best Milk Stout recipe. It's my favorite extract recipe and is nice and thick. It also uses lactose and maltodextrin. The ingredients for Brewer's Best Milk Stout are: Fermentables 3.3 lb. Special Dark LME 3.3 lb. Light LME .5 lb. Lactose .5 lb. ...


2

If you are looking to minimize the roast character and are looking get that smooth, chocolaty thing you may want to use pale chocolate malt. It is much smoother than regular chocolate malt. However, if you up the fruit and reduce the roast, you may get a better reception by calling the beer a black ale vs. a stout. It sounds balanced based on your ...


2

A higher mash temperature would always be my first port of call, push it up to 69-71 C. After that yes oats can help, but you have to be wary of stuck mashes. Longer boils will thicken the final product by concentrating sugars, proteins etc... My recommendation would be to alter only one variable at a time and to start with a higher mash temp, next I ...


2

It may lower the FG and it will also reduce the body of the beer substantially, which will not give you the "heavy" beer you speak of. Also, adding sugar will not change anything with the hops, since the isomerization happened during the boil. I'd advise you to rethink your plan. You may end up with a better beer at the lower OG without the sugar.


1

Do you know the estimated FG of the recipe? There are two possibilities: 1- Your fermentation is done (not stuck), but you can confirm this by trying to restart it. High FG is usually caused by uncontrolled mash temperature (too high or too low) which results in too much non fermentable sugars (unconverted). No problem to bottle at this point. 2- Your ...


1

I didn't see grain crush size mentioned here... Check out this exBeeriment: http://brulosophy.com/2015/11/23/mind-the-gap-course-vs-fine-crush-exbeeriment-results/ He actually made a stout with this, and stated: When presented these beers in a quasi-blind triangle, I was consistently able to distinguish them. I perceived the fine crush beer as having a ...


1

You say you "need it for Tokyo"? If you're patient Advanced Brewing ships specialty yeasts in Japan, though they don't update their stocks so you'll need to check with them to see what they have available by trying to place an order first. I've also been impatient myself and used alternate strains as replacements. In my research I've found that many strains ...


1

Dry yeast is relatively tolerant of mishandling. An 11g packet should be enough to handle an impy stout, especially if you rehydrate the yeast properly before pitching. If you're worried, get a a second packet of US-05; it's very hard to over-pitch. The other concerns you'll have with a high-gravity beer are oxygenation, yeast nutrients and fermentation ...


1

I wouldn't add sugar or honey, since they won't leave residual sweetness. If you are concerned about preserving the hop bitterness to sweetness ratio, then you could make a steep of some light crystal, such as carapils, boil, chill and add that to the fermentor. This will help compensate for the lower OG and lower residual sweetness. However, it's probably ...


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