7

You want to add either all of it, or just the vodka. A lot of the chocolate flavor will get leached into the alcohol so you don't want to toss that. I'd say add it all if you're going into secondary, since you'd rack it again, or just the vodka if adding it at bottling time. A benefit of this technique is that it lets you remove any fats from the chocolate ...


5

Addressing your sanitation questions: Coffee: One of your questions, paraphrased: Should I worry about secondary infection from coffee in secondary? I'd say your risk, much like the risk of most things brewing, is not from the water, which you can pre-boil on the stove or in the microwave, or the coffee which will be subject to a pretty high temperature ...


4

No. I'm not aware of cacao nibs having any enzyme inhibiting abilities. Either something else caused a less fermentable wort. Ie higher temp or low beta-amylase in malt. Or, something caused yeast to give up on an otherwise fermentable wort. Stress, low nutrients, low oxygen, low pitch etc. Edit: looking closer at the recipe I would NOT put a 1.015 ...


2

I would just boost the dextrins in the beer knowing that you will have additional oils from the chocolate (and the coffee). While its a good idea, I'm not sure cold-crashing/skimming would get all of the oil as a lot of it may still be dissolved in solution. Add some oats, extra flaked barley and/or dextrin malt to the mash. With respect to the coffee ...


1

Sorry not really an answer but wanted to say, wow! malting your own barley. That is definitely taking it to the next level for sure. It sounds like you have the passion and excitement to make this a long term affair. Welcome to the brewing family. I've made a few batches of beer that "only it's brewer could palate", and thankfully only one or two that "...


1

I would taste what you have extracted first to see if you like it. Making a tincture (in a solvent like ethanol/vodka) doesn't always result in the same flavor profile as if you had simply racked onto the raw nibs. Another option is to pull a sample of the beer then dose drop wise some of your tincture into it until the flavor is right. If you find a good ...


1

Yeast absorb a lot of those extra tastes from stuff you add to the kettle. If you want to get the maximum taste of a spice or alike, add it as a tincture at bottling time. And even then it may fade over a few months. Btw make sure to add extra carapils or flakes to the mash: oils in chocolate may render the poor head.


1

My brewing buddy and I brew a chocolate oatmeal stout around this time each year. I add in a whole container of cocoa powder and I have never had any issues with astringency. I have tried both natural pressed cocoa and Dutch processed cocoa and haven't noticed a big effect on astringency. I typically add it to the boil, not sure if that may be the reason ...


1

I have not used this cocoa powder, but most cocoa powder that's not sweetened is fairly harsh, and needs a good sweetness backbone to push against. The astringency which can come from both acidic and alkali compounds could be also from the other grains in the grist as well as the chocolate.


1

Some elements in the chocolate are dispersed throughout the beer, so it does affect the FG in principle, but not by any appreciable amount. 8oz in 5 gallons would be much less than 1 gravity point. It could be a stuck ferment, or that your FG realy is 1.022 due to unfermentables. Try rousing the yeast a little and raising the temperature by 5F/2C which may ...


1

I've not used Horizon, but reviews show that it's not a citrus bomb, but on the whole neutral and clean, with some earthiness and spiciness. To my mind, those qualities are good with stouts. For the aroma addition, I would probably go with Wiliamette or similar hop (Ultra, Tettanger, Hallertau, Crystal, although that's a bit pungent) - Centennial is very ...


1

If your brother is a hop head what about doing a Cascadian dark ale (http://www.byo.com/stories/beer-styles/article/indices/11-beer-styles/2072-birth-of-a-new-style-cascadian-dark-ale) like Deschutes Hop in the Dark. I bet that would pair well with your chicory coffee. That way you get the best of all worlds, and the dark and roasted malt wouldn't ...


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