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10

It really depends on what you're after. Traditionally, dried bitter orange peel is added late in the boil for bitterness. Dried or fresh sweet orange peel can be added late in the boil for a bit of flavor, and fresh sweet orange peel can be added to the secondary for aroma. So, you need to think about and define what it is you want the orange peel to do ...


9

Sorry to revive an old thread but my experience of 15 years is this - controls of the same kit, same temperature, same time, same everything except sucrose in one and dextrose in the other. Result - no distinguishable difference when drinking one of each, same ABV, only difference was that sucrose took an extra day to finish primary. Bottom line - drink and ...


8

I agree with Denny, except that I can taste brown sugar, especially when used for priming. It is very subtle and mostly an aroma, but tastes slightly different from cane/beet/corn sugar. Same is true of honey; it mostly ferments out but leaves a subtle residual flavor. I like to use brown sugar on bottle or keg conditioned stouts (oatmeal, milk) and I like ...


8

I don't think lactose is desirable in a cream ale. Don't let the name fool you, cream ales have no cream or lactose or anything of the sort. They're basically American lager type beers fermented with ale yeast. Lactose would add sweetness and take away from the crisp finish most people would find desirable in this kind of beer. That's why the recipe calls ...


8

I don't see any way you could know for certain. IMO, the best way to add flavoring to beer is by taste. Wait until the beer is fermented and pour 4 2 oz. samples. Dose each with a different, measured amount of espresso and taste to determine which you like best. Then scale that amount up to your 23L batch size. I do this with every flavoring I try and ...


8

I'm not sure if this is true in ginger-beer making, but in mead-making, raisins are sometimes added to supply nutrients for the yeast. The all honey and water mixture which is the mead starting point cannot host a very healthy yeast colony without the trace minerals supplied by the raisins. Maybe it is the same for ginger beer... BTW. If you can get your ...


8

Hopefully I can add something here, making the answer non-duplicate. In regards to 'need to add sugar', it is much better to let the yeast ferment everything that they can in the beer, and then add a measured amount of additional sugar. The other choice is to try to predict where the yeast will actually stop, which requires accurate measurement of sugars, ...


7

Check out the 3-part article below. It details experiments using different amounts of Clarity Ferm on different styles of beer. The findings were that Clarity Ferm breaks down gluten nearly completely - well below the "gluten free" maximums - in all beers. http://beerandwinejournal.com/clarity-ferm-i http://beerandwinejournal.com/clarity-ferm-ii http://...


7

Putting a few raisins in a bottle before you cap it, will let you know when its carbonated as the raisins, will float to the top after. They sink at first.


7

Yes, yes it can. Have done so before with Pumpkin Popcorn IPA. It was really good! Salted will pump up your chloride ion count, so be aware of that, and the buttered aspect makes no real difference after mash and boil, any left over fats will get taken up by the yeast. As long as you are not adding an Ounce of butter you should be fine with the small amount ...


6

If you do this you should soak them in a little bit of vodka - effectively making a tincture. There are three reasons why: control: The alcohol will leach the essential oils and you can add the tincture a little bit at a time until you reach the flavor you want sanitation: Juniper berries especially can be used as a fermentation starter as they have a ...


6

You'll get the best flavor if you use whole, and coarsely crack it before adding.


6

I'm not sure you're going to find anything besides recipes that are especially prescriptive about what goes in to the beer. Check out BeerSmith, BrewToad, and other sites to find some recipes. They will give you some concrete examples of grain bills for a style. If you're looking for something more broad, check out the BJCP style guidelines, especially the ...


5

I use it in every batch. Several local breweries in this area, including a rather large one (Yards) use it as well. Word need to be spread about this fantastic product, as it opens the door for most if not all Celiacs to be able to consume beer again, and to rid us of the awful garbage that is sorghum-based gluten-free "beer" (quotes intentional). Yes, the ...


5

The skin of sultanas or raisins have natural occurring yeast needed for the fermentation process. Older recipes typically used a 'ginger bug' derived from the yeast on sultana skin in stead of brewers yeast. It is not coincidental for the sultanas to float as this indicative of the fermentation process active also within the swollen sultanas.


5

It's impossible to look at a beers ingredient list and derive an exact recipe from it. You have to go through a process of trial and error, using any information you can get from the manufacturer combined with experience or intuition. However, the good news is that you probably won't have to do that yourself, because its highly likely someone else already ...


5

The big issue with corn is the germ, which is relatively high in fat (at least compared to other brewing grains). Flaked maize - this will always have the germ and the husk, removed. It is basically pure corn endosperm, which is mostly starch and a small amount of protein. It contains very little fat. Corn meal - this may or may not have the germ, the husk,...


4

Disclaimer: I am neither a medical doctor, nor an expert on making liquor or on this kind of brewing, nor a scientist. Sorry, I am not sure this will work for you, in my uneducated opinion, unless you plan to use only fructose in your liquor. (I am assuming that fructose is safer for diabetics, and you are OK ingesting it, even though I believe the jury is ...


4

Crystal Malt is a subset of Caramel Malt. Thus all Crystal Malts are Caramel Malts, but not all Caramel Malts are Crystal Malts. Confusing the issue of nomenclature is the fact that Crystal Malt is sometimes referred to as Caramel Malt, especially by American maltsters. It is not possible to tell whether a "caramel malt" is Crystal Malt or a non-crystal ...


4

In first place it's very hard to get a blood-red beer. The beers that are said to be red are actually ruby, copper or reddish brown in color. Just to make it clear because you are probably aware of that. My favorite malt for red color is Roasted Barley (in very small amounts - maximum 2% of your grist). Munich is probably one of the best too, and Vienna ...


4

I noted that there are a few commenters above who appear to be confused about the question. Most brewers will know there is sugar at the brewing stage (eg during initial fermentation), and there is - sometimes, additional sugar added at the priming stage. The original question was about the sugar used at PRIMARY fermentation. The addition of sugar or ...


4

I've made two split batches with Clarity ferm (all barley). I can't tell the difference in taste, some claim it might knock the hops (aroma?) down a bit. The person I made the beer for who has CD hasn't had any (detectable) adverse reactions from these two brews. That said, I don't know the ins and outs of CD and if less than 5 ppm will affect some ...


4

I use this in every beer I make. My father is highly allergic to gluten and he is able to drink all of my beer.


4

The earlier in the process you add it, the more flavor you'll lose. The aroma will be boiled off or driven off by CO2 during fermentation. Boiling might extract flavor, but I'm guessing. no idea Add both


4

Pound for pound, Flaked oats and Steel Cut oats should have the same impact on body, flavor, and mouthfeel. Both processes begin with raw, dehulled oats. The "groats" are toasted to halt lipolytic enzyme activity that would make the oats go rancid. Here, the process diverges. Steel cut oats are cut along the length of the groat, giving that small, ...


4

I buy whole coriander and use a mortar and pestle to crack the shells before adding it to the boil. Whole coriander keeps longer and will give a fresher aroma than pre-ground. To grind it at home, a coffee grinder would probably be overkill. You only need to break the shells. If you don't have a mortar and pestle, you can use a meat tenderizing hammer (or ...


4

Myricia Gale - Common names include Bog-myrtle and sweetgale. Also be aware: The plant has been listed as an abortifacient and therefore should not be consumed by women who are, or might be, pregnant. In the UK it is pretty easy to buy on e-bay: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/like/171997384055 I see from your profile/linkedIN you are may be in Spain, so take a ...


4

While I am no expert on this topic, I did a little bit of research to help you out. It is generally understood that in winemaking metabisulphite inhibits bacteria and yeast growth, so I would think that this could cause a problem for you. This topic has been discussed on winemakingtalk and there is a consensus near the bottom of the thread where H2O2 (...


4

IMHO the bananas are best added (mashed up) to the hot wort post boil. Boiling for any significant time can drive off esters that add to the flavour and aroma. Adding to the mash can also increase the bulk volume to crazy proportions, making handling more difficult. A friend has brewed banana beer by vigorously mashing/blending the soft bananas separately in ...


4

The problem with much fresh "Supermarket fruit" is that it is usually picked early and is usually unripe. If one can find "ripe" or "over ripe" fruit in a supermarket then IMHO that is the fruit one really wants to use. Unfortunately such fruit has limited shelf life and so is usually difficult to find unless it has been marked down for quick sale. The most ...


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