34

AFAIK, there are no benefits. They're all basically the same. Brewing sugar is corn sugar and while there may be chemical differences between it and other types of sugar, the end result in your beer will be indistinguishable. Sugars like piloncillo or demarara can add a bit of flavor, but the result of adding corn, cane, beet, or brown sugar are pretty ...


12

I started creating my own recipes by picking a beer that I liked and then trying to brew something close to the commercial example. This is not a bad way to start, since you have a concrete goal that you are trying to achieve. And it can be very educational, since it will teach you a lot about the ingredients that commercial brewers use and in what ...


10

It really depends on what you're after. Traditionally, dried bitter orange peel is added late in the boil for bitterness. Dried or fresh sweet orange peel can be added late in the boil for a bit of flavor, and fresh sweet orange peel can be added to the secondary for aroma. So, you need to think about and define what it is you want the orange peel to do ...


8

Well the main way you learn how to make your own recipes is by picking ingredients out kind of at random at first, kind of like a kid in a kitchen. The problem with this is that your first couple of custom recipes are unlikely to be very good. Here's my advice.... Start off with proven recipes. This means stuff out of 'Brewing Classic Styles' or recipes ...


8

I don't think lactose is desirable in a cream ale. Don't let the name fool you, cream ales have no cream or lactose or anything of the sort. They're basically American lager type beers fermented with ale yeast. Lactose would add sweetness and take away from the crisp finish most people would find desirable in this kind of beer. That's why the recipe calls ...


8

I don't see any way you could know for certain. IMO, the best way to add flavoring to beer is by taste. Wait until the beer is fermented and pour 4 2 oz. samples. Dose each with a different, measured amount of espresso and taste to determine which you like best. Then scale that amount up to your 23L batch size. I do this with every flavoring I try and ...


8

Hopefully I can add something here, making the answer non-duplicate. In regards to 'need to add sugar', it is much better to let the yeast ferment everything that they can in the beer, and then add a measured amount of additional sugar. The other choice is to try to predict where the yeast will actually stop, which requires accurate measurement of sugars, ...


7

Brewing is a lot like cooking. Sometimes your recipe calls for a very simple collection of ingredients (think good Italian food). These types of recipes can call for just 1 or 2 malts, and can be quite delicious. Pilsners, Munich Dunkels, Scotch Ales, some British Ales, simple Belgians, Wheats and more are all styles that can be made with a single type of ...


7

I agree with Denny, except that I can taste brown sugar, especially when used for priming. It is very subtle and mostly an aroma, but tastes slightly different from cane/beet/corn sugar. Same is true of honey; it mostly ferments out but leaves a subtle residual flavor. I like to use brown sugar on bottle or keg conditioned stouts (oatmeal, milk) and I like ...


7

Check out the 3-part article below. It details experiments using different amounts of Clarity Ferm on different styles of beer. The findings were that Clarity Ferm breaks down gluten nearly completely - well below the "gluten free" maximums - in all beers. http://beerandwinejournal.com/clarity-ferm-i http://beerandwinejournal.com/clarity-ferm-ii http://...


6

Typically, dry malt extract is included to make up for liquid malt extract that isn't included. In other words, LME (liquid malt extract) generally comes prepackaged in 3.3 lb. containers. That's great if the amount of malt you need is in multiples of 3.3 lb., but that generally doesn't happen. The DME (dry malt extract) is included to provide the ...


6

Sorry to revive an old thread but my experience of 15 years is this - controls of the same kit, same temperature, same time, same everything except sucrose in one and dextrose in the other. Result - no distinguishable difference when drinking one of each, same ABV, only difference was that sucrose took an extra day to finish primary. Bottom line - drink and ...


6

I can't comment yet, so here is a link. The link takes you to a BYO article that does a good job of explaining adjuncts in brewing.


6

If you do this you should soak them in a little bit of vodka - effectively making a tincture. There are three reasons why: control: The alcohol will leach the essential oils and you can add the tincture a little bit at a time until you reach the flavor you want sanitation: Juniper berries especially can be used as a fermentation starter as they have a ...


6

You'll get the best flavor if you use whole, and coarsely crack it before adding.


6

I'm not sure you're going to find anything besides recipes that are especially prescriptive about what goes in to the beer. Check out BeerSmith, BrewToad, and other sites to find some recipes. They will give you some concrete examples of grain bills for a style. If you're looking for something more broad, check out the BJCP style guidelines, especially the ...


5

One other vital point not mentioned is rehydration temperature. While each strain and manufacturer has different guidelines, they are all in a range of 80-105F, 25-40C, with most being at the top end of that range - much hotter than typical wort temperatures. Rehydrating at room temperature can cause a loss of 60% viability compared to rehydrating at warmer ...


5

Corn will lighten the body of the beer and add a slightly sweet, "corny" flavor. It's subtle, but it's there. Corn is not just a way to cut corners. One of the finest Trappist breweries, Rochefort, reportedly uses corn in their beers.


5

I use it in every batch. Several local breweries in this area, including a rather large one (Yards) use it as well. Word need to be spread about this fantastic product, as it opens the door for most if not all Celiacs to be able to consume beer again, and to rid us of the awful garbage that is sorghum-based gluten-free "beer" (quotes intentional). Yes, the ...


5

I'm not sure if this is true in ginger-beer making, but in mead-making, raisins are sometimes added to supply nutrients for the yeast. The all honey and water mixture which is the mead starting point cannot host a very healthy yeast colony without the trace minerals supplied by the raisins. Maybe it is the same for ginger beer... BTW. If you can get your ...


5

It's impossible to look at a beers ingredient list and derive an exact recipe from it. You have to go through a process of trial and error, using any information you can get from the manufacturer combined with experience or intuition. However, the good news is that you probably won't have to do that yourself, because its highly likely someone else already ...


5

The big issue with corn is the germ, which is relatively high in fat (at least compared to other brewing grains). Flaked maize - this will always have the germ and the husk, removed. It is basically pure corn endosperm, which is mostly starch and a small amount of protein. It contains very little fat. Corn meal - this may or may not have the germ, the husk,...


4

Crystal Malt is a subset of Caramel Malt. Thus all Crystal Malts are Caramel Malts, but not all Caramel Malts are Crystal Malts. Confusing the issue of nomenclature is the fact that Crystal Malt is sometimes referred to as Caramel Malt, especially by American maltsters. It is not possible to tell whether a "caramel malt" is Crystal Malt or a non-crystal ...


4

I noted that there are a few commenters above who appear to be confused about the question. Most brewers will know there is sugar at the brewing stage (eg during initial fermentation), and there is - sometimes, additional sugar added at the priming stage. The original question was about the sugar used at PRIMARY fermentation. The addition of sugar or ...


4

If you can find organic juice over ther in the UK, I'd start there... they usually leave out the preservatives. Just read the label. Ascorbic acid (vitamin c) is ok. Pasturised is ok.


4

Do you have access to millet? That's a very close sub for sorgum. This might not sound appealing, but millet is usually available in pet stores as bird food. Looking around, i spotted a few recipes on homebrewtalk.com for Rwandan banana beer, and a few folks used Oats instead of millet or sorgum, so that seems like a good sub as well, and certainly ...


4

For spruce flavored beers you don't use the wood. You use the fresh lighter green tips that come out in springtime. Its the new growth that is more aromatic and doesn't contain as much of the resins as the woody parts. As far as using your spruce christmas tree, I think you are out of luck.


4

Disclaimer: I am neither a medical doctor, nor an expert on making liquor or on this kind of brewing, nor a scientist. Sorry, I am not sure this will work for you, in my uneducated opinion, unless you plan to use only fructose in your liquor. (I am assuming that fructose is safer for diabetics, and you are OK ingesting it, even though I believe the jury is ...


4

I've made two split batches with Clarity ferm (all barley). I can't tell the difference in taste, some claim it might knock the hops (aroma?) down a bit. The person I made the beer for who has CD hasn't had any (detectable) adverse reactions from these two brews. That said, I don't know the ins and outs of CD and if less than 5 ppm will affect some ...


4

I use this in every beer I make. My father is highly allergic to gluten and he is able to drink all of my beer.


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