Hot answers tagged

9

"How to Brew" by John Palmer. http://www.howtobrew.com/ It is also available as a physical book. Highly recommended! It is generally regarded as the book for getting started these days. Enjoy the hobby!


8

I don't see any way you could know for certain. IMO, the best way to add flavoring to beer is by taste. Wait until the beer is fermented and pour 4 2 oz. samples. Dose each with a different, measured amount of espresso and taste to determine which you like best. Then scale that amount up to your 23L batch size. I do this with every flavoring I try and ...


8

Absolutely not a problem. You will gain just a bit of extra bitterness by boiling longer, but so little that I doubt you could notice it.


8

The term "Bill": be it grain or hops is simply the list of that type of ingredient, weight and time or stage schedule and how it's applied to the recipe. Sample: 2oz Galaxy FWH ( weight, ingredient, added to kettle allowing the first wort of the sparge to mix with the hops, hops stay in for full duration of the boil) Yes all beers have a grain and hop ...


7

The prevailing wisdom on these so called "east coast" IPAs is three fold: The use of ~10% of flaked oats in the grist. A combo of super huge late kettle additions as well as dry hopping. Lastly, the use of London Ale III from Wyeast (Wyeast 1318). Despite London Ale III being a great flocculating English Ale yeast, in the presence of huge amounts of hop ...


7

Yes, yes it can. Have done so before with Pumpkin Popcorn IPA. It was really good! Salted will pump up your chloride ion count, so be aware of that, and the buttered aspect makes no real difference after mash and boil, any left over fats will get taken up by the yeast. As long as you are not adding an Ounce of butter you should be fine with the small amount ...


5

From what I've read, you can do anything that's small enough to fit in there but large enough not to sift into the beer (eg, coffee beans but not ground coffee, whole hops but not hop pellets). Some suggestions I've found that people have reported working well: Candied Bacon Bits (with a strong porter or stout). Peaches (with a blonde beer) Coffee Beans (...


5

I don't have a lot of experience with recipe design, but I can provide some links. Check out this excellent 2010 article from Brew Your Own magazine on Black IPAs. It says that the Great American Beer Festival adopted that style as "American-Style India Black Ale", and the characteristics are: Color = 25+ SRM Original Gravity = 1.056–1.075 Final ...


5

Bitterness is not linear throughout the boil, so you cannot assume that it will be twice as bitter after 60 minutes vs. 30 minutes. I'm also not sure that you're going to get a great sense of the bitterness in the partially-boiled wort vs. the finished beer, but I don't have a really compelling argument as to why not. But I'm not understanding something ...


5

Specialty grains, extract vs. all-grain does not make a difference on fermentation time. The reason to avoid dry-hopping in primary is not for interference with fermentation, but the yeast and CO₂ production will separately steal a lot of hop character. There is something about overpitching yeast, but I wouldn't worry about it too much; if you're really ...


5

I recently turned around an AIPA in 8 days from brewing to drinking. The key was pitching an adequate amount of healthy yeast and carefully controlling fermentation temp. I ran at 63F for 3 days until FG was reached, raised to 70F for 1-2 days to complete fermentation, then crashed to 33 for 3 days to clear the beer, kegged and force carbed.


5

It's impossible to look at a beers ingredient list and derive an exact recipe from it. You have to go through a process of trial and error, using any information you can get from the manufacturer combined with experience or intuition. However, the good news is that you probably won't have to do that yourself, because its highly likely someone else already ...


5

Since the science and techniques of brewing is exactly the same for beginners as they are for somebody who has been brewing for years, are you asking for recipes for malt extract (known as extract brewing - viewed by some as easier) or whole grains (known as all-grain brewing - not any harder, just more time consuming and higher entry investment). Could you ...


5

I answered this mostly as an exercise for myself since I may be in this situation and like fiddling with recipes. My brewing experience on a scale to 0 to 10 isn't 0 but not exactly 1 either. For a 5 gal batch: 6lbs Pilsen DME and 1lbs (you didn't specify so I assumed just 1) will get you either a belgian blonde ale or an american ipa (although light on ...


4

In first place it's very hard to get a blood-red beer. The beers that are said to be red are actually ruby, copper or reddish brown in color. Just to make it clear because you are probably aware of that. My favorite malt for red color is Roasted Barley (in very small amounts - maximum 2% of your grist). Munich is probably one of the best too, and Vienna ...


4

You can scale malt, hops and volumes linearly. While in principle hops don't scale linearly, it's almost linear, and depends upon your kettle geometry. It's not enough of a difference to worry about - the difference is less than the error introduced due to measuring your hops to the nearest 0.1g. Evaporation is also due to kettle geometry, although this ...


4

(Yes, it's semantics: the words have different meanings. :) Mashing is the enzymatic conversion of starch to sugar, using alpha- and beta-amylaze naturally present in grain at the specific temperatures to activate them (~150°F). Steeping is using hot water to extract flavor and color compounds from grain.


4

I use Brewtarget, which has a scale feature, which works up or down. I use to scale down 5 gal batches down to 1 gal. It is also open source(free), and works on linux or Windows.....I have both and use drop box to sync the databases.


4

I'm not sure what exactly attracts slugs to beer. I would try to find out what specifically that is and replicate that as it might be cheaper. However, in general it would be quite hard for you to brew beer cheaper than than the cheapest beer you can buy. Rather, doing so would probably require you to have some equipment, buying which would negate any cost ...


3

The end result is the same, but mashing implies that enzymes are converting starches into sugars. These enzymes work when held around 150°F. The two enzymes are alpha and beta amylase. Alpha works more at higher temperatures (optimal at 158°F) and cuts starches randomly into long chain sugars (only some of which are fermentable). Beta works at lower ...


3

All those answers above used to be the way to go. Since then, Best Malz has introduced Red X malt. It gives you the reddest color I've ever seen, especially if you use it as 100% of your grist.


3

Classic Cream Ales which are an American contribution to the world of beer have use flacked maize or corn as a staple ingredient for three centuries. It started out as a way to brew when barley was in short supply and expensive cutting the cost of the Grist. Cream Ales are generally lighter, less ABV, and refreshing. They do have a slight background hint of ...


3

Its two different options. You can either do the malt version or the extract version. Wheat Liquid Malt Extract is actually a mix (usually 50/50) of wheat malt and pils/2-row/pale malt, depending on the manufacturer.


3

Pretty much any stout recipe can be turned around in that amount of time. I'd shoot for a gravity around 1.040, something in the 4-5% abv range, ferment for a week with properly-rehydrated dry yeast, then bottle and let condition for 2 weeks. As for the recipe, I like something like (for a 5gl batch): 50% pilsner (3 lbs) 20% dark munich (1.25lbs) 8% ...


3

It's pretty straightforward....they're called "post fermentation additions".


3

You are doing two things (over-pitching and fermenting under pressure) that will drastically reduce the amount of ester production, which is primarily responsible for the fruitiness of beer. Over-pitching reduces the extent of yeast growth, which is directly related to ester production. Basically the yeast can reproduce fewer times over, having started at ...


3

Looks Fine.. almost. You do need some yeast nutrients though. And.... 2 cups sugar to 1 gal puts you in Apple wine territory, and will be hard for a bakers yeast to attenuate fully. Also adding a priming sugar will do little with this recipe as the yeast will have died from its ABV tollerance. When I make cider it's like this. 1) Sanitize everthing: ...


3

The American Homebrewers Association: https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/


3

There are so many resources on the internet these days: BeerRecipies.org Brewtoad American Home Brewers Association This is the book from CAMRA in the UK that got me started down this long long road about 14 years ago: CAMRA Guide to Home Brewing Also here there are a number of recipes on this site where people have been asking for comment. If you are ...


3

It looks fine, but I'm not sure you're going to get the desired effect from the diverse hops. I expect that the Fuggle especially will be washed out by the other hop flavors. If you really want to showcase your homegrown hops, consider using just a few of them. The flavors will be more distinct if there's less conflict, C hops are a solid group to work with ...


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