5

Most of the equipment is not really necessary. It may just make it much easier. When you use a bottling bucket, you rack from fermenter to bottling bucket, leaving a layer of dead yeast cells and sediment behind, which makes for clearer beer. This is especially important when dry hopping or adding fruit. With a bottling bucket you won't disturb all that ...


5

It usually happens with strong fermentation when the krausen clogs the airlock, it is then ejected with the pressure. If the fermentation was still active when you returned, the beer might not be contaminated due to gas escaping the container. What makes you think it is contaminated? Is there anything unusual floating on the surface? You can always add ...


4

The beer will clear with a secondary. The trub will precipitate within a week. I have found that the best route to clear beer is to get a strong boil, strong hot break, and strong cool break. This will create larger protein strands that will coagulate and precipitate in the brew kettle. If you plan to use gelatin in the future I would suggest adding it to ...


4

If you have a bucket w/ a tap in it, it sounds to me like you already have a bottling bucket. I'd probably buy another bucket w/o a tap to ferment in and bottle using your current bucket. You can ferment in your current bucket but the sediment can actually build up enough that it will block the spigot. Even if not, you will find the outflow will stir up ...


4

Most people these days do not use secondary. It is not necessary and usually not recommended....Here's what John Palmer had to say.... https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=15108.msg191642#msg191642 "When and why would you need to use a secondary fermenter? First some background – I used to recommend racking a beer to a secondary ...


4

If you don't have a secondary then, feel free to add them to your primary. You don't really have to worry much about making additions in your primary, I have done it many times in the past when I lacked a spare FV to use as secondary, and suffered no ill effects. You may just have to add a little more of any flavourings you are adding as some of the flavour ...


3

You can get clear beer without secondary, including IPAs with dry-hopping. Secondary can improve your beer clarity, but it doesn't necessarily improve clarity. Some people say that the hops can interact with the yeast in the primary and produce unpleasant flavors, although I've never experienced this. You will find tons and tons of threads telling you to dry ...


3

I wouldn't say it is a consensus, although it is not required all the time, there are cases where racking is usefull for beer as well: What's the point of secondary fermentation? A big difference between the process of making beer and wine is the time that the must/wort sits in the container (bucket/carboy/demi-john). Because wine will need more time ...


3

Fermented beer contains somewhere around 0.8 volumes of CO₂. When you rack to secondary, you're certainly causing some (however minimal) agitation of the beer, which will cause some CO₂ to be released. You may also be changing temperature, which might cause some CO₂ to be released. And dry-hopping is going to give tons of nucleation sites for CO₂, which will ...


3

Secondary is generally not necessary. However, for an IIPA, dry hopping is crucial. Based on research done by Stan Hieronymous, I now rack to secondary before dry hopping. If you leave the beer on the yeast, there is an interaction between the hops and the yeast that increases the levels of gerianol and give it (what is to me) an unpleasant floral quality....


3

You used the term "lagering", so if you are truly lagering, the answer is 'it depends'. If your beer is indeed a lager, then your yeast WILL be active....potentially down to freezing temperatures (if your yeast was treated kindly and your temperature lowering regimen was patient). I only make this point since things are moving very slowly at this stage and ...


3

As long as you want. As with anything, there are considerations: Hop Flavor and Aroma This is a big one. Hop compounds break down and dissipate extremely quickly. If you want a fresh hop flavor and/or aroma in the finished product you need to serve the beer ASAP. Age doesn't impact the bittering nearly as much, however. The second consideration with ...


3

I once left a red ale in a glass carboy for almost a year. My girlfriend thought it was ruined, but I kept the airlock full.... it came out great, clear and mellow. Beer I would have paid money for....


3

I do this regularly, not using a keg, but e.g. a glass container. Clean and disinfect well before usage Make sure that you do not splash when transferring What I also do is add some extra sugar to start a little fermentation to let the CO2 blow out the rest of the air after transfer. I use 4g per litre of volume that needs to be filled (you do need an ...


3

This would seem to be the same process as storing beer in a "brite tank" to allow it to clear after fermentation. Using a clean keg is always a good idea but I have found it sufficient to scald the keg using a kettle of boiling water. However I do clean and rinse the keg after use and before storage. One could leave the beer to clear in a barrel/keg/...


3

The question of how much to add and how long is like asking how much salt to put into your food. It depends on the food and your taste. That's why the recommendations you've come across vary so widely. Remember that it's all about balance: the more massively bodied and flavored your beer is, the more oaking you can get away with. In an impy stout you can ...


3

Diacetyl is a normal part of most fermentations. Nice thing is that yeast will eat it. The yeast just needs time. Give it 3-4 weeks of age, and the diacetyl should be cleaned up. No fancy actions are needed, just patience. If 4 weeks doesn't do it, wait a couple more weeks. Keep the cider at a reasonable temperature, upper 50s to 70 F will work just ...


2

So far I've made two brown-chili batches and here's what I did. I actually made a chili concentrate by having hot chili flakes boil in raw alcohol (100% ethanol) for about 30-45 minutes, because Capsaicin is soluble in alcohol (and oil, but oil is not really useful in this case) and this allows you to extract more hotness ;-) Once I had a (very) strong ...


2

The primary function of secondary fermentation is clarification, not fermentation. (Unless you're fermenting something which requires a secondary fermentation addition, like a special yeast addition or dry hopping.) I've found great success by making sure the fermenting wort gravity is within 2-4 points of expected final gravity before transfer to secondary.


2

About the only times I use a secondary any more are when I'm adding more fermentables (like fruit) or when I dry hop. There are interactions between they yeast and dry hops that can result in a really "flowery" quality to the beer due to an increase in geraniol. You don't have to worry about off flavors due to yeast. That's a homebrew myth carried over ...


2

Seems like a good plan. I conduct secondary with low fermentable addition in closed lid buckets without problems. These lids are not perfectly airtight, and this imperfection is enough to let CO2 out. Preferably use oldest (least tight) lid you have. Alternative is possible, too, but it doubles the chance of contamination, and will double oxidation. I would ...


2

Artificial drinks - no Most of them contains preservatives that will kill your fermentation. And if fermentation will not be killed, sugar and water will imbalance original design of your recipe. Juices - no Juices are usually around 1.04 as far as I know, and you went with 1.06, so this will restart your fermentation and dilute the effect. Condensed ...


2

No, you will be fine. This question has been answered before here and here. On a personal note, I just bottled a batch last night that sat in the primary fermenter for six weeks, and it tasted very good. Incidentally, racking to a secondary vessel introduces a very small risk of oxidation or infection, and is unnecessary work unless (a) you plan to long-...


2

When I think of "raking to a secondary" I can think of two reasons you would want to do this. #1-Clarity; racking gives the beverage more time for sediment to settle out. #2-Aging; depending on the beverage racking give it more time to age.


2

My routine is to dry hop in that primary towards the end of fermentation. At fermentation temperatures. Then I rack to a keg (or a secondary in your case) to add my gelatin. But there is no "aging". Its an IPA. I want it to go from fermenation to dry hop to serving as quickly as I can.


2

I've always done finings after all fermentation addition schedules have completed. Most finings work best during or after cold crash. You want your hops to be warm and suspended for their dry hop duration for best results.


2

For taste and aroma, 4 to 7 days of dry hopping are optimal. For clarity I prefer to give isinglass 7 to 14 days. Probably it's the same with gelatin, these are similar. Thus, I obviously add gelatin first, hops second. One more thing. If you want to rack to secondary, strongly consider adding gelatin after racking. I guess you will be using another bucket ...


2

It's probably as safe as anything in a sanitary environment, though if I'm understanding you correctly it means another, however small, potential window of exposure to dangerous microbes since you're racking twice. I've reused yeast a few times to no ill effect, but a lot of literature advises against doing it more than that. It also sounds like more work ...


2

Don't wash with wort, you won't get the chance. It will take off before what you want to extract settles. Just rack on top the cake and use it for what it is. As long as you practice good sanitation to the fermentor while racking the old beer out and the new in you can keep it longer. Use a sanitary siphon style cane, or wrap the cane and access port with ...


2

You can. Don't do it. Transfer beer to bottling bucket just before bottling. Add priming sugar, let it dissolve. Bottle. Bucket will be partially empty most of the time anyway, because you are bottling. If you want to rack to secondary, just do it, but don't use bottling bucket, use regular one, and don't worry too much for head space. That's all. If you ...


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