14

Dry hopping in primary is totally fine, I do it all the time. It does the exact same thing. The main reason for secondary is getting clearer beer, but I never do secondary as it increases the chance of oxidization and infection. I get very clear beer without secondary just by cold crashing and letting it sit for a while. After kegging/bottling, just let it ...


7

Likely late in the game now, but you can also put oak chips on a sanitized cooking sheet at 200F or so and leave in the oven for 15 minutes or so. This will sanitize the chips, and subtly brings out some of the flavour, but not too much tannic or other astringent flavours. Essentially you are pasteurizing the oak chips by heating them to 138F (min), before ...


7

By being safe and deliberate with your racking methods, I doubt you'll have much of a problem. I believe a fair amount of the problems stem from lack of improper methods of racking (among other things). Some of the things that cause oxidation include: Not getting the siphon tube to sit in the bottom of carboy/bucket/keg while transferring Getting a lot of ...


6

Oxidization happens when there is oxygen dissolved in the beer, such when the beer is splashed or agitated in air. I've always been careful with racking, using either a regular siphon started by blowing into the carboy (through a sanitary air filter) or via an autosiphon. About 2 years ago, I had oxidization problems in a few batches which appeared after ...


5

There's no reason you can't ferment a 2.5 gal. batch in a 5 gal. gal. carboy, at least through 3-4 weeks of primary fermentation.


5

Racking to secondary and letting it sit for a few more days or a week can improve clarity slightly but is by no means necessary. It will however make things easier to bottle without stirring up sediment in the process. If you're careful you can bottle straight from primary with about the same results. I'm guessing since this is your first brew that you will ...


5

There are a variety of techniques to clarify beer. Filtering is the quickest method but will strip out the yeast you need for natural carbonation, and potentially also some flavor compounds. Finings (gelatin, isinglass, others) will help large particles drop out; I'd recommend reading posts here about finings and/or talking to your LHBS about techniques with ...


5

Most of the equipment is not really necessary. It may just make it much easier. When you use a bottling bucket, you rack from fermenter to bottling bucket, leaving a layer of dead yeast cells and sediment behind, which makes for clearer beer. This is especially important when dry hopping or adding fruit. With a bottling bucket you won't disturb all that ...


5

It usually happens with strong fermentation when the krausen clogs the airlock, it is then ejected with the pressure. If the fermentation was still active when you returned, the beer might not be contaminated due to gas escaping the container. What makes you think it is contaminated? Is there anything unusual floating on the surface? You can always add ...


4

Avoiding sediment floating around in the glass is often a function of carefully pouring from the bottle. If bottled beer is allowed to sit and condition properly, given time the yeast and other solids in suspension will settle to the bottom and create a fairly tight sediment in the base of the bottle. Upon opening a careful pour should leave much of it ...


4

In my experience, the biggest cause of non-clear beer in your glass is chill haze. You can rush from fermentation being complete to bottling, without any significant "conditioning" time, and the beer in the bottles will become crystal clear quite soon. But put those bottles in the fridge and you'll have chill haze by the time the beer is at drinking ...


4

"Because I'm wondering if the whole "oxidation" concern is really only applicable to someone who is splish-splashing around in the kitchen." In a word, yes.


4

After only a few days in primary, there's almost certainly enough yeast suspended in the beer to ferment the sugars in the fruit. There are a couple exceptions to this rule: Very high gravity beers. The high alcohol levels in the finished beer are toxic to yeast. Beers that have aged for many months. Most of the yeast will have precipitated ot. In these ...


4

Couple of possibilities: A cellulose-producing bacteria, such as acetobacter. Certainly looks like it to me. Tartness is another indication of this. Vinegar or acetate smell is also a clue for acetobacter. That looks similar to cellulose you'd see in something like a new kombucha SCOBY. Some other bug. Much less likely: overheated gelatin finings / mash ...


4

The beer will clear with a secondary. The trub will precipitate within a week. I have found that the best route to clear beer is to get a strong boil, strong hot break, and strong cool break. This will create larger protein strands that will coagulate and precipitate in the brew kettle. If you plan to use gelatin in the future I would suggest adding it to ...


4

If you have a bucket w/ a tap in it, it sounds to me like you already have a bottling bucket. I'd probably buy another bucket w/o a tap to ferment in and bottle using your current bucket. You can ferment in your current bucket but the sediment can actually build up enough that it will block the spigot. Even if not, you will find the outflow will stir up ...


4

Most people these days do not use secondary. It is not necessary and usually not recommended....Here's what John Palmer had to say.... https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=15108.msg191642#msg191642 "When and why would you need to use a secondary fermenter? First some background – I used to recommend racking a beer to a secondary ...


4

If you don't have a secondary then, feel free to add them to your primary. You don't really have to worry much about making additions in your primary, I have done it many times in the past when I lacked a spare FV to use as secondary, and suffered no ill effects. You may just have to add a little more of any flavourings you are adding as some of the flavour ...


3

A 3 Gallon Carboy is $20 USD i think. I would much rather let my beer condition the proper length of time then be dissatisfied with the end product. After all about $20ish worth of materials probably went into the beer no? As to bottle conditioning vs secondary conditioning. While yes you can simply condition in the bottles you will be waiting longer and ...


3

Use a hydrometer and take a reading at the same time every day for the next three days. If the reading is the same each time, then fermentation should be done. Airlocks aren't really a great indicator as far as determining when fermentation is finished, so don't rely entirely on that. Also, Sometimes you may not see much krausen during fermentation, other ...


3

Cold crashing will definitely reduce the amount of yeast found in the bottle. And with less yeast in suspension there will be less floatables to reflect light, meaning your beer will appear darker than it would had you skipped cold crashing. I agree with @cleber in that you definitely will need extra time to properly carb up your bottles but everything ...


3

You used the term "lagering", so if you are truly lagering, the answer is 'it depends'. If your beer is indeed a lager, then your yeast WILL be active....potentially down to freezing temperatures (if your yeast was treated kindly and your temperature lowering regimen was patient). I only make this point since things are moving very slowly at this stage and ...


3

As long as you want. As with anything, there are considerations: Hop Flavor and Aroma This is a big one. Hop compounds break down and dissipate extremely quickly. If you want a fresh hop flavor and/or aroma in the finished product you need to serve the beer ASAP. Age doesn't impact the bittering nearly as much, however. The second consideration with ...


3

I once left a red ale in a glass carboy for almost a year. My girlfriend thought it was ruined, but I kept the airlock full.... it came out great, clear and mellow. Beer I would have paid money for....


3

Secondary is generally not necessary. However, for an IIPA, dry hopping is crucial. Based on research done by Stan Hieronymous, I now rack to secondary before dry hopping. If you leave the beer on the yeast, there is an interaction between the hops and the yeast that increases the levels of gerianol and give it (what is to me) an unpleasant floral quality....


3

You can get clear beer without secondary, including IPAs with dry-hopping. Secondary can improve your beer clarity, but it doesn't necessarily improve clarity. Some people say that the hops can interact with the yeast in the primary and produce unpleasant flavors, although I've never experienced this. You will find tons and tons of threads telling you to dry ...


3

Fermented beer contains somewhere around 0.8 volumes of CO₂. When you rack to secondary, you're certainly causing some (however minimal) agitation of the beer, which will cause some CO₂ to be released. You may also be changing temperature, which might cause some CO₂ to be released. And dry-hopping is going to give tons of nucleation sites for CO₂, which will ...


3

I wouldn't say it is a consensus, although it is not required all the time, there are cases where racking is usefull for beer as well: What's the point of secondary fermentation? A big difference between the process of making beer and wine is the time that the must/wort sits in the container (bucket/carboy/demi-john). Because wine will need more time ...


3

I do this regularly, not using a keg, but e.g. a glass container. Clean and disinfect well before usage Make sure that you do not splash when transferring What I also do is add some extra sugar to start a little fermentation to let the CO2 blow out the rest of the air after transfer. I use 4g per litre of volume that needs to be filled (you do need an ...


3

This would seem to be the same process as storing beer in a "brite tank" to allow it to clear after fermentation. Using a clean keg is always a good idea but I have found it sufficient to scald the keg using a kettle of boiling water. However I do clean and rinse the keg after use and before storage. One could leave the beer to clear in a barrel/keg/...


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