13

You can safely dilute at any stage. Contamination is probably the biggest risk. But just takes basic sanitation practices to avoid. Oxydation: Really only an issue if 50% or more of the alcohol is present. Just don't splash, use a tube to add water below the wort surface. Diacetyl: It isn't an "infection" it's produced by all yeast during growth phase but ...


8

Adding water after primary fermentation is possible and called high gravity brewing. Yeast produce more esters at higher gravity which is a disadvantage for most beer types, but often desired e.g. for Hefeweizen. For a witbier is shouldn't be a problem, either.


8

Regarding contamination, if you boil the water you are using to dilute and let it cool in a sanitised pot, then add it you should avoid bacterial or wild yeast contamination. At that OG (1080) don't worry about oxygen, if anything your yeast will need more of it due to the high starting gravity. When I do 1080+ beers, I often open the FV after 24H, to let ...


8

At what temperature did you eventually mashed? Not sure how it works out with BIAB, but adding grains to a regular mash (even less volume compared to BIAB), the temperature only drops a few °C's. My guess is that if you added the grains at 80°C, you mashed at around 76/77°C. This is way too high, but 72°C is also too high. Mash temps range from 62-70C°, ...


6

You are absolutely correct. Unless something is dissolved into the liquid, or there's so much trub that the hydrometer is sitting on top of it, the reading will be unaffected.


6

Yes, it will to some extent. Not only will the higher alcohol affect it, but your beer will also be less hoppy and bitter than you intended it to be. Yes, you should always strive to hit your OG, but this is homebrewing....sometimes you'll be low or high. Being high isn't too big a deal because you can always add water to get back to what you intended, at ...


5

If you follow a process like this, you won't be far off: Dilute the syrup to create a 10% solution. E.g. add 10g of syrup to 90g of water and stir well. Take the specific gravity of the 10% solution, e.g. 1.030 Express this as a fraction of a 10% solution of sucrose, which has specific gravity 1.040. So, our example of 1.030 is .75 the gravity of a 10% ...


5

Yes, a lower original gravity will result in a lower-alcohol final product. However, if this was an extract kit and if you added the correct amount of water, the discrepancy is almost certainly a measurement error. A common mistake is to draw the hydrometer sample without having first mixed the extract thoroughly into the water. This will lead to an observed ...


5

The combination of hydrometer and refractometer readings can be used to estimate the ABV % of a finished fermentation. See the section titled Measurement of ABV in this BYO article.


5

The easiest way to determine the effect of starter gravity is to decant the starter so the amount is negligible. In addition, I've found that it makes better beer.


5

If the starter fully fermented, most of the 1.040 should be gone; normal yeast attenuation is around 75%, so you should have 1L of 1.010 beer in the starter vessel. 1L of 1.010 beer into 19L of 1.076 OG wort would reduce the OG down to about 1.073. (76 points * 19L + 10 points * 1L) / 20L = 72.7 points = 1.073. Though if possible, you should try to cold-...


5

You don't need a starter since you're pitching to 1/4 batch size that a whitelabs vial is good for. Normally you'd use 2-4 vials for a 20 liter batch, depending upon gravity, so that's equivalent to 1/2 to 1 a vial for a 5 liter batch. For the detailed figures, see Always making a starter vs. following package description. One way to know the OG prior to ...


5

What you're looking to do is called high gravity brewing. This technique is oft employed by macro brewers to produce more beer with less fermenter space. They dilute after fermentation is complete. Some Useful Resources: Brew Your Own Article Beer and Wine Journal Article Part 1 Beer and Wine Journal Article Part 2 Some Considerations Yeast Health: Your ...


4

The key piece that's missing here is extraction efficiency - how much sugar you can get out of the grains. In the calculator, it's set at 80%, but it's doubtful you got that just from steeping and lautering in a pot. You typically need continual recirculation to get 80%+. With my old equipment (a large cooler with a hand-made series of pipes with slits.) I ...


4

You can, of course decrease it by adding water......this calculator will help: http://merrycuss.com/calc/gravityadjustmentwater.html If you don't decrease your gravity a couple of things could happen. First, your yeast might not work, usually different (or more) yeasts are used for high gravity brews. If your yeast does work it might not attenuate fully. ...


4

Yes this is a normal behavior, but not one we like in brewing. We like to see good activity in less than 12 hours. Forget the recomended times in your instructions, they are lost in lag now. Let primary fermentaion complete, then rack secondary if called for. Causes of a long lag time are numerous. Insufficient o2, insufficient nutrients, under pitching, ...


4

Your mash temp favors beta-amylase which makes a more fermentable wort. While beta-amylase denatures beginning at 149°F / 65°C it takes a little time. It's possible your thermometers are slightly out of adjustment and you may be further in beta range than realised. For a less fermentable wort mash at 154-156°F, this will denature beta-amylase quicker and ...


3

Don't worry about it too much. The answer to your question lies in your opinion only. If you add more water at bottling, all you will do is dilute it - less flavor and a lower ABV. Once you have your FG reading, calculate your ABV and then decide if you would like it to be lower. I know you aren't asking for opinions, but I'll give it anyway: I would not ...


3

You are almost right; the mash gravity depends on the mash efficiency which in turn depends on the mash temperature and mash time. A higher mash temperature will result in longer sugars which are harder for the yeast to ferment. This leads to more full bodied beer. A lower mash temperature will give shorter sugars which are easy for the yeast to ferment, ...


3

You don't need to be excessively concerned now. If the beer really was 1.076, the yeast will multiply to the quantity needed to ferment it - they don't just suddenly stop working when the OG goes above 1.060 - the yeast will still ferment and make beer. However, the multiplication is a stress factor for the yeast and the beer will not be as good as if you ...


3

If you used extract, and you didn't dramatically change the water volumes or add any additional fermentables, then it's highly unlikely that your gravity is that far off. The usual cause with this sort of process is incomplete mixing of the boiled portion added to the water in the carboy, leading you to get a sample of the exceptionally-concentrated boiled ...


3

Sounds like you didn't get much saccarification (sugars coverted from starch) in the mash. Causes. 1: poor crush on the grain 2: low diastatic power 3: high water grist ratio 4: mash not long enough Edit: just did the C/F conversions. At 169.7°F your mash was too hot and you denatured your enzymes, causing low diastatic power and giving little ...


3

Really can't say how the lactos is effecting the gravity with out the whole recipe. It's very likely it can finish out the remaining points with some time and warmth. Bring it up to 70°F and give it a swirl to stir up the yeast. 1.030 is only a few points off from the high end of a sweet stout's FG of 1.024.


3

Suggested OGs are around 1020-1030 from a number of forums, but people are making big 1090 OGs. Regarding FG I recall they end quiet dry as there is often only simple sugars and very little tri-saccharides or longer polysaccharides. so I would expect around 997-1004. What little I can find on the google seems to agree, I have a book at home I will dig it ...


3

My recipe 1 cup sugar (5.7 oz) 6 liters water (1.58 gal) 1/4 cup loose black tea I've never measured the OG or the FG, but the recipe calculates to OG 1.014. The reason why I've never measured the FG is because I just tasted it every so often, and pull it off the SCOBY when it tastes right to me. There is no reason to having booch that's too sweet or too ...


3

Undermodified 6-row barley by itself doesn't have enough enzymes to give you complete conversion of starches to sugars, so you end up with low gravity. Add some highly modified malt (i.e. one with high diastatic power) to help out the 6-row. Here is an article that may help: https://byo.com/stories/issue/item/3604-brewing-by-ratio


3

At what gravity did it started and what was it when the water was added? If the fermentation only just started and still has a long way to go, oxidation would most likely not be a problem. Also the risk of contamination would be minimal I guess. Tab water itself is usually very clean in terms of bacteria (in most western parts of the world at least ;). For ...


3

As Evil Zymurgist said, you can estimate OG and ABV based on uncorrected refractometer reading and final gravity, more precisely : The formula is the following : Complete explanation can be found in : http://www.moundtop.com/alcohol/Alcohol-via-Refractometer-Hydrometer.pdf which is based on the papers : Rogerson, F. & Symington, C. (2006). A method for ...


3

Yes it's totally possible. But I would expect a lower OG than you estimate. 1.071 is possible to drop out that quick but not very likely. Take a hydrometer AND refractometer reading on the finished beer and feedbthose values to the tool in BeerSmith under refractometer tools to get an actual OG estimate.


3

The 17 days of fermentation is more than enough to finish fermentation, your 1.015 is a good FG. After fermentation (about 7 days more or less), the yeast will flocculate to the bottom. You already know the answer to your question "What to expect?", it is way too strong of a beer, perhaps 8.5% to 9% of alcohol, instead of 5%. As suggested by dmtaylor, if ...


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