13

You can safely dilute at any stage. Contamination is probably the biggest risk. But just takes basic sanitation practices to avoid. Oxydation: Really only an issue if 50% or more of the alcohol is present. Just don't splash, use a tube to add water below the wort surface. Diacetyl: It isn't an "infection" it's produced by all yeast during growth phase but ...


8

Adding water after primary fermentation is possible and called high gravity brewing. Yeast produce more esters at higher gravity which is a disadvantage for most beer types, but often desired e.g. for Hefeweizen. For a witbier is shouldn't be a problem, either.


8

Regarding contamination, if you boil the water you are using to dilute and let it cool in a sanitised pot, then add it you should avoid bacterial or wild yeast contamination. At that OG (1080) don't worry about oxygen, if anything your yeast will need more of it due to the high starting gravity. When I do 1080+ beers, I often open the FV after 24H, to let ...


8

At what temperature did you eventually mashed? Not sure how it works out with BIAB, but adding grains to a regular mash (even less volume compared to BIAB), the temperature only drops a few °C's. My guess is that if you added the grains at 80°C, you mashed at around 76/77°C. This is way too high, but 72°C is also too high. Mash temps range from 62-70C°, ...


7

Here's some tips on getting an accurate hydrometer reading: check the hydrometer is calibrated, by checking that water reads 1.000 at the calibration temperature (either typically 65F or 20C). I've tried both distilled water and tap water and by both read the same. when taking a sample from a extract-based brew, particularly partial boil where top up water ...


6

You are absolutely correct. Unless something is dissolved into the liquid, or there's so much trub that the hydrometer is sitting on top of it, the reading will be unaffected.


6

Yes, it will to some extent. Not only will the higher alcohol affect it, but your beer will also be less hoppy and bitter than you intended it to be. Yes, you should always strive to hit your OG, but this is homebrewing....sometimes you'll be low or high. Being high isn't too big a deal because you can always add water to get back to what you intended, at ...


5

You do it by multiplying the ratios of the imperial/English units to metric units: 1 kg is 2.204 lb 10l is 2.641 gal To convert from pounds per gallon to kilos/decaliter you multiply by 2.204/2.641 = 0.834 The answer is then 46*0.834 = 38.4 points per kilo/10 l. Edit: I always find these things confusing with "cascaded" ratios - points per pound per ...


5

The combination of hydrometer and refractometer readings can be used to estimate the ABV % of a finished fermentation. See the section titled Measurement of ABV in this BYO article.


5

The easiest way to determine the effect of starter gravity is to decant the starter so the amount is negligible. In addition, I've found that it makes better beer.


5

If the starter fully fermented, most of the 1.040 should be gone; normal yeast attenuation is around 75%, so you should have 1L of 1.010 beer in the starter vessel. 1L of 1.010 beer into 19L of 1.076 OG wort would reduce the OG down to about 1.073. (76 points * 19L + 10 points * 1L) / 20L = 72.7 points = 1.073. Though if possible, you should try to cold-...


5

An OG reading of 1.12 seems about double what you would expect for that grain bill, and gravity is only really affected by dissolved solids. Obviously the first thing you should do is check your hydrometer to make sure it is accurate, that is almost certainly the cause of the error. In water the specific gravity should read 1.00 since specific gravity is ...


5

(TOG - GR * (BV/FV)) / (45/FV) = lbs of DME to add pre-boil to hit target OG TOG = Target Original Gravity in Points GR = Gravity Reading in Points BV = Boil Volume (This is what you are taking your reading from) FV = Final Volume (i.e. 5 gallons) 45 = # Gravity Points you get per lb of DME per gallon So lets say you are making a 5 gallon smash beer with ...


5

Yep, you've got it. I've seen it and had it happen many times before I started doing full boils. Even when you think you've got it well mixed, you probably haven't! Since you use extract, it's going to be more accurate to calculate the OG than measure it.


5

If you follow a process like this, you won't be far off: Dilute the syrup to create a 10% solution. E.g. add 10g of syrup to 90g of water and stir well. Take the specific gravity of the 10% solution, e.g. 1.030 Express this as a fraction of a 10% solution of sucrose, which has specific gravity 1.040. So, our example of 1.030 is .75 the gravity of a 10% ...


5

Yes, a lower original gravity will result in a lower-alcohol final product. However, if this was an extract kit and if you added the correct amount of water, the discrepancy is almost certainly a measurement error. A common mistake is to draw the hydrometer sample without having first mixed the extract thoroughly into the water. This will lead to an observed ...


5

What you're looking to do is called high gravity brewing. This technique is oft employed by macro brewers to produce more beer with less fermenter space. They dilute after fermentation is complete. Some Useful Resources: Brew Your Own Article Beer and Wine Journal Article Part 1 Beer and Wine Journal Article Part 2 Some Considerations Yeast Health: Your ...


4

EDIT: I'm not sure I realized it was 50 points we were talking about here, or just let my attention wander for a bit! Suspended solids can make a difference (see the comments), but you'd almost have to be measuring the SG of slurry for it to make that much of a difference! If the original recipe called for 2 cans of extract, and you used 3 then that's just ...


4

You don't need a starter since you're pitching to 1/4 batch size that a whitelabs vial is good for. Normally you'd use 2-4 vials for a 20 liter batch, depending upon gravity, so that's equivalent to 1/2 to 1 a vial for a 5 liter batch. For the detailed figures, see Always making a starter vs. following package description. One way to know the OG prior to ...


4

The key piece that's missing here is extraction efficiency - how much sugar you can get out of the grains. In the calculator, it's set at 80%, but it's doubtful you got that just from steeping and lautering in a pot. You typically need continual recirculation to get 80%+. With my old equipment (a large cooler with a hand-made series of pipes with slits.) I ...


4

You can, of course decrease it by adding water......this calculator will help: http://merrycuss.com/calc/gravityadjustmentwater.html If you don't decrease your gravity a couple of things could happen. First, your yeast might not work, usually different (or more) yeasts are used for high gravity brews. If your yeast does work it might not attenuate fully. ...


4

Yes this is a normal behavior, but not one we like in brewing. We like to see good activity in less than 12 hours. Forget the recomended times in your instructions, they are lost in lag now. Let primary fermentaion complete, then rack secondary if called for. Causes of a long lag time are numerous. Insufficient o2, insufficient nutrients, under pitching, ...


4

Your mash temp favors beta-amylase which makes a more fermentable wort. While beta-amylase denatures beginning at 149°F / 65°C it takes a little time. It's possible your thermometers are slightly out of adjustment and you may be further in beta range than realised. For a less fermentable wort mash at 154-156°F, this will denature beta-amylase quicker and ...


3

You are almost right; the mash gravity depends on the mash efficiency which in turn depends on the mash temperature and mash time. A higher mash temperature will result in longer sugars which are harder for the yeast to ferment. This leads to more full bodied beer. A lower mash temperature will give shorter sugars which are easy for the yeast to ferment, ...


3

You don't need to be excessively concerned now. If the beer really was 1.076, the yeast will multiply to the quantity needed to ferment it - they don't just suddenly stop working when the OG goes above 1.060 - the yeast will still ferment and make beer. However, the multiplication is a stress factor for the yeast and the beer will not be as good as if you ...


3

It's hard to get a low original gravity when brewing from an extract kit. As long as you added all the malt extract and sugar provided with the kit, and you added the correct amount of water, there's really no way for the starting gravity to be low. I can think of two possible reasons that your OG was lower than expected: you added more water than ...


3

You say its taking "Far Longer." how long have you been fermenting? What is the gravity of the pils? if your IPA gravity is 1008/1007 over the last two days I would say your pretty near finished. Assuming your IPA was in the 1050s/1060's when you started; you got great attenuation, I would check gravity again tomorrow and if your getting the same range go ...


3

You could add enough DME to offset the lower than expected starting gravity. However, you run a couple of risks by doing so. Contamination. You'll want to boil the DME in a small amount of water to ensure any foreign organisms are dead. Cool it to room temperature before adding to the fermenter. Also, sanitize everything that comes in contact with the ...


3

John Palmer's book "How to Brew" offers a table of typical Malt yields including some of his own research on steeping yields. I enjoying calculating my recipes by hand rather then using brewing software, so I find the yield table helpful! Info can be found here.


3

Instead of a table, you could use an free online calculator such as Beer Calculus to calculate the OG, along with other things about the recipe. There are also several offline software programs that do this such as BeerSmith, although it is not free.


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