18

The caps are not perfectly smooth - they contain nucleation points, imperfections or dirt along the surface, where a bubble could form (similar to how boils are formed at nucleation points when heating water). As the cold water heats up, dissolved gasses are forced out of solution. Some of this gas dissipates, but some of it will attach to the nucleation ...


12

There are two parts - carbonation, and getting it in the bottles. For carbonation, there are various methods, but I use the set-it-and-forget-it method. Beer goes in keg, keg goes in fridge, CO2 gas gets put on keg. Just set the pressure to the amount of CO2 you want in solution - "volumes" of CO2 - based on the style of beer and a handy temperature / ...


12

Mason jars are designed to retain a vacuum seal, not keep outward pressure in. Chances are it may hold the pressure up to a certain point before the actual seal on the lid fails, but the glass itself is not tempered glass, and therefor is not designed to withstand the pressures of bottle conditioning. Bottle conditioning inside of mason jars may easily ...


11

What you propose will work fine. You can even keep StarSan in a spray bottle (mixed with distilled water it will last months or more) and spray down the surfaces. Although due to FDA regulations they have to list a longer contact time, Charlie Talley of 5 Star Chemical, makers of StarSan, has said that their tests show a 99.9% effectiveness after a 30 ...


11

weigh your priming sugar, don't measure the volume boil it in just enough water to dissolve it for a few minutes pour that sugar syrup into your bottling bucket rack the beer onto the sugar mixture give it a couple gentle stirs with a sanitized spoon That works for me. Hopefully it will work for you, too!


10

Having done both, I can tell you that sugar (corn or table, doesn't matter) is the way to go. It's easy reliable and tasteless. Priming with gyle (the name for what you propose) is uncertain and offers no advantage to your beer.


9

For cleaning, I rinse bottles with hot water immediately after pouring them out into my glass. They don't need any sort of washing with soap at that point. I keep them off to the side until I have a whole bunch ready for de-labeling, which is an overnight soak in a sink full of PBW. Most labels just slide right off the next day. A quick rinse and the bottles ...


9

Most of the priming sugar available at homebrew shops is finely granulated dextrose/corn sugar. It can be confused with; but it is not confectioners sugar. Most confectioners sugar contains anti-caking agents in it, like cornstarch or silicates. Neither of these are necessarily good for your beer. I stopped buying "priming sugar" from the shop and ...


8

Yeast will become dormant and eventually die after a few weeks to months, but only after any food sources, like priming sugar, have been consumed. The lack of carbonation after a month could be caused by a number of things insufficient yeast - normally there is yeast in suspension after primary, but a highly flocculative strain may settle out completely. ...


8

Probably overkill. Assuming the caps are sanitized, the capper does not come into contact with anything that it could spoil or infect on the bottle. At that point in your process, bottles and caps will be so covered by sanitizer, I'd say youre safe.


8

Using sorbate is the only way to have a chance of stropping fermentation and even that can be unreliable. If you keg rather than bottle, attempting to stop fermentation is less dangerous since a keg won't explode like bottles can. As has been said, the real solution is to brew the beer you want to drink.


8

According to this page, which was linked to recently on Basic Brewing Radio's facebook page, you can make no-rinse sanitizer with: bleach diluted to 80 ppm an equivalent amount of white vinegar to adjust the pH (mixed in after the bleach has been mixed into the water -- do not mix full-strength bleach and vinegar directly) This info is apparently backed up ...


8

Replace the seals. Buying 100 seals from eBay should cost you something like US$10. I also use swing-top bottles, and my protocol is to replace a seal immediately after opening a bottle that turned out to be undercarbed.


8

It is a mechanical cap, as long as the mecanism and rubber is good, the bottle will be good. Changing the rubber seal is one way to expand the life of these bottles, however you should inspect the seals and if the rubber has not dried out, then it is still good. Sometimes I will just flip the rubber seal around to make sure it is not always compressed in ...


7

I do not refrigerate my beer until it is ready to drink, generally about 2 weeks after bottling. I will leave it at room temperature, out of the sun, indefinitely from the time I bottle it until I am ready to drink it.


7

The neck on the screw cap bottles is exposed to much less stress than a cork bottle, so they are made thinner, and consequently cheaper. Can and should you do it? This post on HBT sums it up nicely: There are a couple of trains of thought with this. physically, in most cases, it can be done it doesn't have the greatest presentation, if that'...


7

This is not really a mistake but just a byproduct of the process of bottle conditioning which most homebrewers go through. The sediment is dead yeast cells and proteins that are in suspension in beer but drop out over time. You can reduce the amount of sediment by racking but unless you filter it out somehow you'll never get rid of it all. The sediment ...


7

Add it at bottling or kegging. The flavoring does not need to sit for a prolonged period if you do not add too much so adding it to the secondary would be redundant. The time in the bottles to carbonate should be plenty of time to get what you are looking for. A tip for the amount to add: Take a 1/2 pint and drop some of the flavoring in and taste, add a ...


7

Since you have the red baron capper, the crown size is actually interchangeable. Noted in the below picture, these metal brackets on each side slide out, revealing a different size crown on it's opposite side. You can then flip the bracket and slide it back in. This is where I would start, especially since you state the caps are the exact same size. I have ...


7

If bottle-conditioning is completely finished, there's no reason it won't be ready to drink as soon as it's cold, if you're only considering carbonation. The amount of CO2 in solution is indeed determined by temperature and pressure, but since we're talking about a closed system, the total amount of CO2 inside the bottle can't change once it's there, it can ...


7

Give it a try-- fill a bottle with water, put a cap on, flip it upside down, and see if any water drips out. If the cap makes a watertight seal, then the next time you're bottling fill a couple and see how they work out.


7

Compute the total amount of spraymalt required to carbonate your entire batch of beer. Dissolve that amount of spraymalt in a cup or two of water to create your priming solution. Boil it briefly to sanitize. Allow it to cool. Pour it into your bottling bucket. Rack the beer onto it. Personally, I find that giving the entire batch a gentle stir at this point ...


7

I can't imagine anyone suggesting bottling at a FG of 1.042 I would return them to the fermenter and allow fermintation to complete. Those are bottle bombs. Be careful. Many yeasts don't survive at 6.5% ABV, but there are plenty that do. Wine yeasts for example. At 1.042 we would call that a stalled or stuck fermentation, and a more tolerant yeast can be ...


7

You'll never remove the sediment at the bottom when bottle conditioning. 5-6mm is not a terribly large amount of sediment either. Here are a few methods that can reduce the sediment: Use a secondary fermentor, typically a 5-gallon carboy. This is used after primary fermentation, and has little to do with fermentation despite the name. It removes the beer ...


7

If you are worried about the yeast getting through that bag, you have nothing to worry about. When we talk about sterile filtration, the generally accepted size of the filter is .45u (micron). 1000 microns = 1 millimeter. While the mesh on that bag is less than a millimeter, it's not even close to .45u. I don't think that most breweries even sterile filter ...


7

You do not want to do this. Carboys are not meant to hold pressure and will break. If you want clearer beer, aging it longer in a carboy and/or using something like gelatin or whirlfloc will greatly aid in clarity.


6

Commercial breweries use two main types of labels: Glue labels, and Sticker-type labels. Glue labels are easy to remove by soaking in percarbonate based cleansers (OxyClean, Easy Clean, B-Brite, One Step, PBW, and others). You can also use water plus Ammonia, or just plain hot water. Some scraping may be required for complete removal. Glue labels are most ...


6

Getting the Labels Off I'm only adding a little bit here. I only use OxyClean, like many others, but what I do is put the bottles standing up in a cooler, then fill them with hot tap water. Dump a bit of oxyclean in the cooler, and fill it with hot water. It holds the temp for quite a long while, after a couple of hours the labels are floating off, or they ...


6

Oh, if only you were 28, then I'd all be fine. Just kidding. I'd be surprised if this accident noticeably affects the beer, regardless of your age or state of health. Beer is a pretty unpleasant place for most bacteria, and that combined with the yeast activity in the bottle that scavenges any available oxygen, and the bacteriostatic nature of the beta ...


6

You should actually brew beers you want to drink. If you brew kits, look for one that has the amount of alcohol you want. If you are all grain, you can tweak any number of things to achieve the desired ABV - from type of yeast to mash temp etc. So yeah you can stop fermentation in your beer but its not a good idea. Unless you have a keg you will have ...


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