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7

You want to add either all of it, or just the vodka. A lot of the chocolate flavor will get leached into the alcohol so you don't want to toss that. I'd say add it all if you're going into secondary, since you'd rack it again, or just the vodka if adding it at bottling time. A benefit of this technique is that it lets you remove any fats from the chocolate ...


4

If you don't have a secondary then, feel free to add them to your primary. You don't really have to worry much about making additions in your primary, I have done it many times in the past when I lacked a spare FV to use as secondary, and suffered no ill effects. You may just have to add a little more of any flavourings you are adding as some of the flavour ...


3

This peaked my interest awhile back, there are a lot of articles of big breweries doing this Unicorn of brewing. From what I've found it's really expensive to do right (without chemical color stripping). My research lead me to an experiment for extracting coffee flavor but not color. The trick is to basically rinse off the oils from ground coffee (espresso ...


2

I agree with previous answers: if you have no secondary, there's nothing wrong with chucking whatever you want to add into the primary. However, if your additions are highly aromatic, you may want to add them only after 3 days or so when the fermentation begins to calm down a little, or the vigorous bubbling of the initial fermentation stage may carry off ...


1

yes, go right ahead, that's what I did and it worked out fine.


1

This is a tough question because most of the easy answers will earn flames from the purists. It can easily be argued that a beer that gets its flavor from vodka extracted augments is really just a cocktail that happens to use beer as its base liqour. Still, if you don't mind creating the wine-cooler of beers, I'll try to help you get where you wanna go....


1

I would taste what you have extracted first to see if you like it. Making a tincture (in a solvent like ethanol/vodka) doesn't always result in the same flavor profile as if you had simply racked onto the raw nibs. Another option is to pull a sample of the beer then dose drop wise some of your tincture into it until the flavor is right. If you find a good ...


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