Hot answers tagged

15

I vote for ageing, 45 IBUs isn't that bitter, and the bitterness will round out over time. It's more important that you nail down if this is how it should have turned out, or if there was a process problem, so you can avoid doing the same again in future. Are you accustomed to drinking IPAs? I remember my first which was around 45 IBUs, and thought it was ...


10

It's a combination of human perception and physical science. Volatile compounds are less volatile at cold temperatures (physical chemistry), and the human nervous system is dulled or numbed slightly at colder temperatures (human). This is the same reason why the Brits like to drink their beer "warm" (not ice cold = more flavor), and why the mega brewers ...


7

Add it at bottling or kegging. The flavoring does not need to sit for a prolonged period if you do not add too much so adding it to the secondary would be redundant. The time in the bottles to carbonate should be plenty of time to get what you are looking for. A tip for the amount to add: Take a 1/2 pint and drop some of the flavoring in and taste, add a ...


7

I just co authored a book on commercial beer recipes for homebrewers. One of the recipes I got was Rogue Hazelnut Brown ale. The recipe came directly from brewmaster John Maier. They used to use Flavormate extract, but have switched to the Northwestern brand. John says it has much more flavor than other brands. Based upon their usage, 1/2 tsp. for a 5 ...


7

The advice that I give all new brewers is to taste what you have at every step. Taste your grain, taste your runnings, taste your wort when it goes into the fermenter and, of course, taste it when you bottle or keg. As long as you used sanitary practices, you'll end up with beer, and most likely, better beer than you'll find at your local pub. 61 IBUs isn'...


6

As an alternative to drinking it, you could cook with it and use it in marinades. In this arena you can take advantage of the concentrated flavors and bitterness. Obvious examples would be beer brats, beer cheese soup, beer cheese dip, beer bread etc. Over the time it would take you to cook with 5 gallons of beer, it would still offer you the chance to see ...


6

An biology take on it: Aroma: Perceived through your nose Flavor: Mostly perceived through your tongue although the aroma also helps your brain on forming the overall impression (think how things taste 'bland' when your have a flu and your nose is blocked)


6

I think you are missing some information. First of all, often what works for commercial brewing doesn't necessarily apply to the homebrew scale; and trying to replicating may have little to no meaningfully positive effect on the beer. Second, the reason pro kettles are covered is because they are being directly vented outside to prevent the brewery from ...


6

It may be too much information, but here's an excerpt from my upcoming book "Experimental Brewing"... Vanilla can be used in several different forms. Start by obtaining the best vanilla you can find, whether it’s vanilla beans or extract. Beans should be moist, pliable, fat, and “juicy”. Extract should not have any fake aromas or flavors to it. ...


6

Usually the biggest concerns of a slow chill are.... DMS (cooked corn flavor) is created from SMM when wort is hot. DMS will form until below 140°F (60°C). SMM is boiled off during boil, it's why we do an open lid boil. SMM has a half life of 37 minutes. 90minute boils usually reduce SMM levels below the perception threshold. Unwanted bittering late ...


5

From what I've read, you can do anything that's small enough to fit in there but large enough not to sift into the beer (eg, coffee beans but not ground coffee, whole hops but not hop pellets). Some suggestions I've found that people have reported working well: Candied Bacon Bits (with a strong porter or stout). Peaches (with a blonde beer) Coffee Beans (...


5

Yes, a lower original gravity will result in a lower-alcohol final product. However, if this was an extract kit and if you added the correct amount of water, the discrepancy is almost certainly a measurement error. A common mistake is to draw the hydrometer sample without having first mixed the extract thoroughly into the water. This will lead to an observed ...


5

Don't use commercially produced Graham crackers, as these will contain unconvertible starches, oils, fats, preservatives, etc that can wreck your beer. Also, you can never assume that a finished flavor will transfer into a fermented product like that. I was on a quest once to get "graham cracker" flavor into a brown ale, and while I never got the perfect ...


5

'Do you think this will work with most recipes?' I think it will. The thing about intentionally stronger flavors is that they tend to mask other unwanted flavors that develop over time. Precisely why brewing a light beer (say, a Helles) can be so difficult; every little flaw will come through, having no strong flavor to hide it. '...add more hops, more ...


5

Kegged beer should last almost as long as bottled beer if sanitation and gas pressures are properly maintained. I don't think you need to do anything different because you are kegging it. The high ABV should allow you to store it in a keg for many months if not years.


5

I don't age my ciders intentionally. I control the fermentation so they are clean. While I have aged cider up to two years in bottles (Got lost in cooler) I prefer it fresh. My friends that do spontaneous fermentation say they take up to 18 months to melow into something nice. It really depends on how you ferment. Note: If you add sugar to boost ABV it's ...


4

I made a honey licorice porter a couple of years ago, and it came out pretty well. I used dried licorice root at the end of the boil, which my LHBS sells. Like this: http://morebeer.com/view_product/15607//Licorice_Root_2_oz The licorice flavor was subtle but noticeable, and pleasant against the malt base and roastiness in the porter. Here's the recipe, ...


4

In terms of the basic senses, flavor comes from the sense of taste, which is primarily from the tongue. There are 5 types of flavor the tongue can detect: sweet, sour, salt, bitter and savory (the last one is a relatively new discovery.) Our sense of smell can detect an almost infinite number of different smells, since a single smell is really a combination ...


4

I do this. I have a two inch chimney that I use to channel steam out of my kitchen. The lid also helps maintain a boil with less heat, which is convenient for me. I did tests early on with six row and very pale pilsner malts to see if I would get any DMS issues, but I didn't. One of these days I'll get around to figuring out how to measure it quantitatively, ...


4

The earlier in the process you add it, the more flavor you'll lose. The aroma will be boiled off or driven off by CO2 during fermentation. Boiling might extract flavor, but I'm guessing. no idea Add both


4

Do you always add your malt extract at flameout? My main concern here is having malt present in the boil with the hops allows for some of the flavor compounds to be extracted from the hops. Boiling the malt extract for 60 minutes also drives off dimethyl sulfide aroma compounds and coagulates proteins in the malt to create "hot break" material. I ...


4

You've made sugar wine, called kilju in Finland. It's also the precursor to rum, which is distilled from a wine made from sugar cane juice or molasses. It's safe to drink, but to everyone's taste.


4

Generally, most yeast created flavors will happen in the first 72 hours. After that (in general) you can start ramping up. You can also wait 4-5 days to be safe.


4

Adding to @FranklinPCombs's answer, if you have a CO2 canister, prefill your bottles with CO2 before filling them. That will guarantee that the head space contains no free oxygen and might buy you a little more shelf life.


4

Grats on your first brews! Sounds like yeast stress esters from possibly under pitching or lack of oxygen, maybe even autolysis if it's sitting in a primary for 3 weeks. Suggestions: Use a yeast calculator. Single pack or vials are usually only enough up to about 1.040 OG. Use a starter to grow a proper pitch or use multiple packs. Oxygenate your wort. ...


4

This is purely anecdotal, but I feel like my ciders have been pretty harsh early on and have improved with time, but it was a quicker timeframe than I had expected (a few months, not years). If you ferment to dryness and don't backsweeten (as I do, I like a dry cider), it seems like the tart "green apple" flavor is par for the course, and doesn't really go ...


4

I would add the ingredients in late fermentation. When there is plenty of alcohol, minimal co2 blow off, but still active yeast. This will allow the yeast to consume those sugars, dominate the culture and preserve your flavor and aromatics of the adjucts. Especially if the ingredients have fermentable sugars. Adding more sugars after fermentation has ...


4

I always recommend adding non fermentable flavorings as close to packaging as possible. This helps prevent that flavor and aroma from getting "blown out" by fermentation.


4

Certain foods can have effects on taste buds. Rinsing your mouth out with water (not mouthwash as that can do the same thing) will help. This is why we learn to food and beer (or wine) parings. When I do bottle shares, always have water available, or bland foods to rinse a certain beer out, and that way one taste does not have an effect on the next.


3

A few drops of vodka (or higher proof Everclear if you can get it) on top of the spices/additives, just enough to wet them. Let sit for 60 seconds and add to beer. Realistically, you probably would be fine adding them directly to the beer without sanitizing. Finished beer is aseptic enough to withstand additives without infecting, it's unfermented wort that ...


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