9 votes
Accepted

Does homebrewed beer have a "Golden Age"?

Beers do tend to age and have a sweet spot, per se, of when their flavor peaks. Every beer and beer style is different without a doubt. But what you are describing is more related to your experience ...
  • 36.2k
8 votes

Left bottles in car overnight - am I screwed?

The yeast is dormant, not likely dead. Leave them in a warm place for a couple weeks or so and they should be fine.
  • 33.3k
8 votes
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Bottle conditioning beer without sugar

Hopefully I can add something here, making the answer non-duplicate. In regards to 'need to add sugar', it is much better to let the yeast ferment everything that they can in the beer, and then add a ...
  • 3,030
8 votes
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How long should a carbonated bottle be refrigerated prior to drinking?

If bottle-conditioning is completely finished, there's no reason it won't be ready to drink as soon as it's cold, if you're only considering carbonation. The amount of CO2 in solution is indeed ...
7 votes

Reduce sediment in bottle for IPA

You'll never remove the sediment at the bottom when bottle conditioning. 5-6mm is not a terribly large amount of sediment either. Here are a few methods that can reduce the sediment: Use a ...
  • 411
6 votes
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How do I limit the amount of sediment in bottles?

You're going to be attempting a fine line of enough yeast to consume sugars to properly carbonate the beer versus reducing sediment in the bottle. The sediment you're seeing could be a variety of ...
  • 176
6 votes
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Same priming sugar when using larger bottles?

I use the same amount of priming sugar, in the batch, and I use a mix of bottles. 12oz and 32oz. and they carbonate the same. if you are adding sugar to individual bottles, then the amount would be ...
  • 1,759
6 votes
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Bottle Bombs or Paranoia

According to this calculator, adding 1.4oz of sugar to 2gal at 35°F is equivalent to adding 5.4oz at 68°F. At 35°F the disolved CO2 is around 1.61vol whereas at 68°F it is 0.86vol. In your case the ...
  • 799
5 votes
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Can I cold condition outdoors?

Yep. Just keep it away from sun light. I do this all winter without problems.
  • 161
5 votes
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Bitter still flat after 2 weeks of bottle conditioning

Give it some time. I had a stout take about a month before there was a decent head.
5 votes
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Force-carbonation of unfiltered beer?

Force carbonation is very common for homebrewers. I'd imagine any homebrewer with a kegging setup does force carbonation by default. I would guess, too, that it's much more often than not done without ...
  • 10.1k
5 votes

Bottling Bucket - really necessary?

Most of the equipment is not really necessary. It may just make it much easier. When you use a bottling bucket, you rack from fermenter to bottling bucket, leaving a layer of dead yeast cells and ...
  • 1,226
5 votes
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PET Bottle shelf life

IMHO PET bottles will keep beer very well for up to 6 months. Beer can be kept longer than that but I have noticed that "fizzy drinks" PET bottles can lose pressure after a year or so. Apparently the ...
  • 5,611
5 votes

Conditioning and storing beer at temperatures around -5°C

It's fairly safe to say that bottle conditioning at -5°c will not yield good results. Even high ABV beers stored below freezing will form ice crystals and force a separation of the water and ethanol. ...
5 votes
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Unexpected flavours after bottle conditioning

Bottle conditioning, not to be confused with bottle aging, is only for natural carbonation. You want to use a monosaccharide sugar like powdered corn sugar so it's easily and completely consumed by ...
5 votes

First time brewing with Mr. Beer

"Rafts" or anything floating at this stage sounds infected. If you had good fermentation it's unlikely it will be harmful to sample. Open one, see if you can recover the floaty. If its white / ...
5 votes
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Cidery or wine flavor after bottle conditioning ale

I saw that "cidery due to too much simple sugar" issue mentioned in a few places, but for some weird reason I haven't experienced it, even though my bottling procedure always includes table (cane) ...
  • 1,488
4 votes

Does bottling conditioning change the nature of the carbonation?

It depends entirely on what you mean by 'the nature' or 'quality of of the carbonation'. If we're talking carbonation and only carbonation (literally the level of dissolved carbon dioxide in the ...
4 votes
Accepted

Bottle conditioning / carbonation temperature

Beer needs to be warmer when you bottle condition. This allows the yeast to work hard at getting the priming sugar into CO2. However, too warm and the beer will stale faster. I recommend moving the ...
  • 2,446
4 votes

Experimenting with primary-only and primary-secondary fermentation

Here is a good test of what you are looking to do. http://brulosophy.com/2014/08/12/primary-only-vs-transfer-to-secondary-exbeeriment-results/ Here is the conclusion of the test: Once all the ...
4 votes
Accepted

Bottle Conditioning Lager with Priming Sugar and/or Yeast

Yes, priming sugar is usually added to the carboy or bottling bucket just prior to bottling for ease. However there are "carbonation drops" you can alternately add to each bottle. These are just sugar....
4 votes
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Bottling Bucket - really necessary?

If you have a bucket w/ a tap in it, it sounds to me like you already have a bottling bucket. I'd probably buy another bucket w/o a tap to ferment in and bottle using your current bucket. You can ...
4 votes

should i re-rack my beer?

Most people these days do not use secondary. It is not necessary and usually not recommended....Here's what John Palmer had to say.... https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=...
  • 33.3k
4 votes
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How much yeast to add for bottle conditioning

There actually are a number of references in the literature to this issue. In general it seems that a standard target would be pitching (or to be more accurate, ensuring there are) 1 million healthy ...
4 votes

30° Celsius bottle conditioning. How bad is it?

Not bad at all. The only time temperature control is crucial is during fermentation, not conditioning. I live in Queensland Australia where the temps exceed 30 Celsius regularly in the Summer and my ...
4 votes
Accepted

Temperature fluctuations during carbonation/conditioning

IMHO the minor fluctuations in temperature don't really affect the overall flavour because the beer has a thermal capacity to resist rapid temp changes. Gradual changes over half a day will affect it ...
  • 5,611
4 votes
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Bottled a Belgian ale not carbonating

This is a high gravity beer right? Just wait, it will get there. Ensure they are stored somewhere good for ale temperatures (> 15C / 60F). If you're really worried, give them a gentle shake every ...
  • 2,050
3 votes

bottle conditioning ale below room temperature

Be patient. It will carb, it will just take longer. Wait another week or so, then start sampling to see if it's carbed yet.
  • 33.3k
3 votes

Bottling high gravity FG barley wine

I would definitely not bottle yet. You may get bottle bombs, but you'll definitely get a beer that's too sweet. It's only been 2 weeks and for a high gravity barley wine, that's not much at all. ...
  • 329
3 votes

First Batch Bottle Exploded

Five gallons worth of priming sugar going into four gallons of beer is most likely your problem. The possibility of inadequately stirring it into the beer before bottling (surprisingly not all that ...
  • 5,954

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