9 votes
Accepted

Does homebrewed beer have a "Golden Age"?

Beers do tend to age and have a sweet spot, per se, of when their flavor peaks. Every beer and beer style is different without a doubt. But what you are describing is more related to your experience ...
brewchez's user avatar
  • 36.2k
7 votes

Reduce sediment in bottle for IPA

You'll never remove the sediment at the bottom when bottle conditioning. 5-6mm is not a terribly large amount of sediment either. Here are a few methods that can reduce the sediment: Use a ...
Sam's user avatar
  • 411
6 votes
Accepted

Same priming sugar when using larger bottles?

I use the same amount of priming sugar, in the batch, and I use a mix of bottles. 12oz and 32oz. and they carbonate the same. if you are adding sugar to individual bottles, then the amount would be ...
jsolarski's user avatar
  • 1,769
6 votes
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Bottle Bombs or Paranoia

According to this calculator, adding 1.4oz of sugar to 2gal at 35°F is equivalent to adding 5.4oz at 68°F. At 35°F the disolved CO2 is around 1.61vol whereas at 68°F it is 0.86vol. In your case the ...
JeanMi's user avatar
  • 799
5 votes

Bottling Bucket - really necessary?

Most of the equipment is not really necessary. It may just make it much easier. When you use a bottling bucket, you rack from fermenter to bottling bucket, leaving a layer of dead yeast cells and ...
Robert's user avatar
  • 1,266
5 votes
Accepted

PET Bottle shelf life

IMHO PET bottles will keep beer very well for up to 6 months. Beer can be kept longer than that but I have noticed that "fizzy drinks" PET bottles can lose pressure after a year or so. Apparently the ...
barking.pete's user avatar
  • 5,631
5 votes

Conditioning and storing beer at temperatures around -5°C

It's fairly safe to say that bottle conditioning at -5°c will not yield good results. Even high ABV beers stored below freezing will form ice crystals and force a separation of the water and ethanol. ...
Evil Zymurgist's user avatar
5 votes
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Unexpected flavours after bottle conditioning

Bottle conditioning, not to be confused with bottle aging, is only for natural carbonation. You want to use a monosaccharide sugar like powdered corn sugar so it's easily and completely consumed by ...
Evil Zymurgist's user avatar
5 votes

First time brewing with Mr. Beer

"Rafts" or anything floating at this stage sounds infected. If you had good fermentation it's unlikely it will be harmful to sample. Open one, see if you can recover the floaty. If its white / ...
Evil Zymurgist's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Cidery or wine flavor after bottle conditioning ale

I saw that "cidery due to too much simple sugar" issue mentioned in a few places, but for some weird reason I haven't experienced it, even though my bottling procedure always includes table (cane) ...
Roman's user avatar
  • 1,498
4 votes
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Bottling Bucket - really necessary?

If you have a bucket w/ a tap in it, it sounds to me like you already have a bottling bucket. I'd probably buy another bucket w/o a tap to ferment in and bottle using your current bucket. You can ...
Freedom Francis's user avatar
4 votes
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Bottle Conditioning Lager with Priming Sugar and/or Yeast

Yes, priming sugar is usually added to the carboy or bottling bucket just prior to bottling for ease. However there are "carbonation drops" you can alternately add to each bottle. These are just sugar....
Evil Zymurgist's user avatar
4 votes

should i re-rack my beer?

Most people these days do not use secondary. It is not necessary and usually not recommended....Here's what John Palmer had to say.... https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=...
Denny Conn's user avatar
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4 votes
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How much yeast to add for bottle conditioning

There actually are a number of references in the literature to this issue. In general it seems that a standard target would be pitching (or to be more accurate, ensuring there are) 1 million healthy ...
Franklin P Combs's user avatar
4 votes

30° Celsius bottle conditioning. How bad is it?

Not bad at all. The only time temperature control is crucial is during fermentation, not conditioning. I live in Queensland Australia where the temps exceed 30 Celsius regularly in the Summer and my ...
Dwayne Charrington's user avatar
4 votes
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Temperature fluctuations during carbonation/conditioning

IMHO the minor fluctuations in temperature don't really affect the overall flavour because the beer has a thermal capacity to resist rapid temp changes. Gradual changes over half a day will affect it ...
barking.pete's user avatar
  • 5,631
4 votes
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Bottled a Belgian ale not carbonating

This is a high gravity beer right? Just wait, it will get there. Ensure they are stored somewhere good for ale temperatures (> 15C / 60F). If you're really worried, give them a gentle shake every ...
Kingsley's user avatar
  • 2,060
3 votes

Off flavours from unsanitized priming sugar

I usually dissolve my sugar in boiling water, before adding it to the bottle or kegs for priming. I have in the past just added half a spoonful of granulated sugar directly to the bottles with no ...
Mr_road's user avatar
  • 7,048
3 votes
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Why are some of my batches too sweet in the bottle, and can I rescue them?

Temperature is your most likely culprit. Other possible cause could be not enough yeast in suspension. Typical if fining agents are used in secondary. You're probably past the window for only temp ...
Evil Zymurgist's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Not quite at FG with an extract batch after two and a half weeks... Safe to bottle?

0.004 difference is also 1 Blg difference, to say it in units I know. That's pretty big here. At the same time, it's also pretty possible your fermentation has finished. If in doubt, I would try fast ...
Mołot's user avatar
  • 3,718
3 votes

Is this cider recipe I made ok?

Looks Fine.. almost. You do need some yeast nutrients though. And.... 2 cups sugar to 1 gal puts you in Apple wine territory, and will be hard for a bakers yeast to attenuate fully. Also adding a ...
Evil Zymurgist's user avatar
3 votes

How can I contain unexpected bottle bombs

No matter how careful you are, you can pick up a wild yeast infection and wind up w/ gushers and bottle bombs. They do explode w/ some force--enough to cause minor injuries for sure--but a regular ...
Freedom Francis's user avatar
3 votes

30° Celsius bottle conditioning. How bad is it?

Temperature will affect the flavor in the long run, but you won't notice anything if it is only a short period of time. Once bottle conditioning is complete, you better store your beer in a cool ...
Philippe's user avatar
  • 4,806
3 votes

First time brewing with Mr. Beer

Floating things in the bottle after that period of time doesn't sound good... Did you add some sort of solids like dry hops or spices to the fermentation? Could be yeast of course, but this usually ...
JesseB1234's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Best yeast for bottle conditioning

In theory all strains could be used. One thing to watch out for is the attenuation level of the yeast, you don't want the new yeast to ferment more sugars than its primary predecessor. On top of the ...
JesseB1234's user avatar
3 votes

Can I increase the carbonation of already-bottled beer?

Yes, maybe. You can add a measured amount of sugar and that can increase your carbonation but you're inviting other problems. 1. The yeast may have temporarily stalled out, and if it takes off again ...
Robert Zormeir's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Can I increase the carbonation of already-bottled beer?

I have such experience, and it's possible: there is, almost always, enough yeast in the bottle to process the extra priming sugar. A few things to check before you try and do it: - are you sure all ...
Roman's user avatar
  • 1,498
3 votes

Storage Temperature

Beer should be stored cool. Around 7°C (45°F), never colder than 3°C (37°F) [#1]. Charles Bamforth says that every extra 10°C (50°F) of temperature doubles the rate of beer aging. So when your beer ...
Kingsley's user avatar
  • 2,060
3 votes

Is it Safe to Carbonate Beer in a Can?

I am the guy that asked the question you referenced. Since asking that question, I have canned 500+ 16oz cans of beer and session mead/melomel. I notice that it has only been a couple of months, which ...
Rob's user avatar
  • 411
3 votes

My newly bottled beer was in <40 degree weather for 6 hours; is it ruined?

You are right. Cold temperatures only slow down the yeast, not completely kill them. As long as the beer is kept at the correct temperature for the rest of the time, it should turn out fine.
Czernina's user avatar
  • 560

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