22

I'll simply quote part of what John Palmer said in the "Ask the Experts" section if the American Homebrewers Association website.... "The risk inherent to any beer transfer, whether it is fermenter-to-fermenter or fermenter-to-bottles, is oxidation and staling. Any oxygen exposure after fermentation will lead to staling, and the more exposure, and the ...


14

Dry hopping in primary is totally fine, I do it all the time. It does the exact same thing. The main reason for secondary is getting clearer beer, but I never do secondary as it increases the chance of oxidization and infection. I get very clear beer without secondary just by cold crashing and letting it sit for a while. After kegging/bottling, just let it ...


12

The debate is basically whether there is any benefit to the risk(s) caused by racking to a secondary fermenter after the primary fermentation has completed. There are many reasons people rack to a secondary fermenter. This isn't the place to discuss whether they're myths or not, but here are the reasons: Getting the beer off the trub helps it clarify ...


8

The need to rack to secondary is a somewhat controversial topic, but here's my opinion: leaving the beer on the lees, in the primary, for another three weeks will have no adverse effects on flavor. In fact, transferring to secondary introduces a small risk of infection, and offers little or no benefit and so should be discouraged.


8

Use Secondary Fermentation Do Not Use Secondary Fermentation -------------------- --------------------- ---------------------------- Oxydation Risk Increased risk of oxydation. No increased risk of This occurs whenever beer ...


8

A good starting point for fruit additions in 1lb/gl. Strawberries are pretty subtle, though. I added 7.5lb to 5gl of blonde this summer, and the flavor was easily noticable without being overpowering.


7

There's a small risk that by removing the beer from the bulk of the yeast, your attenuation might be lower. That is, the beer might end up lower alcohol and sweeter than otherwise. However, as long as you pitched enough healthy yeast and the fermentation was vigorous, you're unlikely to see any problems. Don't do anything at this point. The beer should ...


7

There is no reason to secondary that beer. Most homebrewers these days don't bother with secondary unless adding fruit or something else that will cause fermentation to restart. Here's what John Palmer, Jamil Zainisheff and others have to say...."Therefore I, and Jamil and White Labs and Wyeast Labs, do not recommend racking to a secondary fermenter for ...


7

Question 1 is hard to answer because its so dependent on the relative humidity and air flow of the room in question. I wouldn't assume an airlock with water would be safe for more than 4 weeks without checking on it or topping it off. Vodka is sometimes recommended as an airlock liquid, but I think its is a bad idea for long-term storage. Being roughly a 50/...


7

According to info I got from John Palmer for an upcoming article I wrote for BYO magazine, the cleanup happens concurrently with fermentation. Here's the quote..."Yeast have 3 phases in their life cycle: Adaptation, High Growth, and Stationary. (See Yeast by CW and Jamil) They do not have a maturation phase where they clean up byproducts. Adaptation phase ...


6

I use a large noodle strainer. place the stainer at the opening of the ale pail and steadily poor the wort through the stainer into the bucket. Then I just lift the stainer and throw away the trub.


6

BE SURE to boil any water you add at this point to deoxygenate it. If you don't, the added water will oxidize your beer and promote faster staling.


6

When racking from a primary fermenter to a secondary vessel, you will leave behind a non-trivial amount of "stuff" so the volume in the secondary will be less than the volume in the primary. If you start with five gallons in the fermenter you won't have five gallons left to bottle, but it isn't any more concentrated than when you started. If your OG and FG ...


6

It is difficult to impossible to get much flavor out of watermelon due to its water content. There just isn't a of of flavor there to start with, and any sugars in the watermelon will be consumed by the yeast.


5

There are pros and cons to each approach. In most cases, a long primary will be better than using a secondary fermentation vessel. There are three distinct advantages to leaving the beer in primary, without using a secondary at all: There is less risk of oxidation and infection since one transfer is eliminated. You do not need an expensive carboy to use ...


5

Some widely respected people advise against it, like: Racking to prevent autolysis is not necessary Whilst it might be true, in some cases, it is not true in case of strong stuff, stuff that will stay in fermenter long time. See wine resources - for yeast wine with nutrient is not so different than wort. And even if this particular part, this one reason ...


5

If you use a non-transparent plastic bucket or carboy for your primary, moving it to a transparent plastic or glass carboy allows you to see the clarity of the beer before bottling. You will be able to bottle your beer when the desired clarity is reached. In most cases, moving to a secondary is purely cosmetic.


5

Once fermentation is mostly complete, keeping the fermentor at the ideal temperature (68, in this case) is less important. The yeast tend to give off fusels and other off flavors at high temperatures mainly during the early stages of fermentation, so raising the temperature won't matter as much. Since fermentation is mostly complete, lowering the temperature ...


5

I think secondary "fermentation" is kind of a misnomer, since fermentation is largely complete by this point. It's more of a secondary "clarification" stage where yeast and other stuff falls out to the vessel bottom. Given this, I think it would certainly be safe to try. All of the alcohol is already in there, acting as a natural preservative. If anything ...


5

Racking to secondary and letting it sit for a few more days or a week can improve clarity slightly but is by no means necessary. It will however make things easier to bottle without stirring up sediment in the process. If you're careful you can bottle straight from primary with about the same results. I'm guessing since this is your first brew that you will ...


5

There are a variety of techniques to clarify beer. Filtering is the quickest method but will strip out the yeast you need for natural carbonation, and potentially also some flavor compounds. Finings (gelatin, isinglass, others) will help large particles drop out; I'd recommend reading posts here about finings and/or talking to your LHBS about techniques with ...


5

I believe it will be possible to add extra water to decrease the ABV but is it really necessary? If so I would get purified water and for a 43L batch add a few liters to decrease the ABV. Do this in the new carboy before racking the brew into it. If it was me I would leave it though. As mentioned by others without having the exact readings it is hard to say ...


5

At this point you don't know if the fermentation is stuck or finished. Despite the yeast attenuation rating, it's the fermentability of the wort that determines attenuation. Alcohol tolerance is not the problem. More yeast might help or it might not. Before you do anything you should try a fast ferment test to determine if there are any more fermentable ...


5

What you describe in your comments sounds like trub (pronounced "troob"). It's mostly yeast, proteins, fats, and sometimes hop material. It's totally normal for that stuff to settle to the bottom of the vessel after fermentation is complete. You don't filter it; you just let it settle and then carefully siphon the beer off while picking up as little of the ...


5

Give it some time. I had a stout take about a month before there was a decent head.


5

Like above, I've found corney kegs to be a great sealed aging container. Couple notes. I wouldn't allow any pressure in any glass carboy. Below is box from 6gal Italian glass carboy. ! PSI is pounds per square inch. Conditioning and secondary can easily make 2 bars, about 27psi. Because of the surface area a carboy would fail at a fraction of that. Plastic ...


5

You may be interested in Wood Toxicity and Allergen Chart presented at The Wood Database. With very important warning: Just because any given wood is not listed on the chart, does not mean that it is completely safe to use. It simply means that adverse reactions have not been reported as of yet. That said, there is over 200 kinds of wood in this one ...


5

You are leaving the time for the finings to bind the yeast together and then giving them time to drop to the bottom of your FV. If you leave this a week longer all that will happen is the finings will sit at the bottom holding onto your yeast. If you ever drop your beer into casks you can add finings and leave the cask sitting around for a month, the ...


5

CO2 in suspension will cause bubbles to come out of the airlock long after the fermentation is done. It is an indicator, but not a precise one. Experience will tell you that for a particular yeast/wine, fermentation takes, for instance, 5 days to complete if all parameters are identical. Again, it is not precise. You should get an hydrometer and mesure ...


4

One option is to get an appropriately sized funnel with a removable screen. I just bought one of these recently (the funnel cone is huge) and used it for the first time last night. The only downside is that I had to stop a couple times to unclog the screen, and of course I realized after doing so that my fingers hadn't been sterilized (should have had a ...


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