8

A good starting point for fruit additions in 1lb/gl. Strawberries are pretty subtle, though. I added 7.5lb to 5gl of blonde this summer, and the flavor was easily noticable without being overpowering.


7

There's a small risk that by removing the beer from the bulk of the yeast, your attenuation might be lower. That is, the beer might end up lower alcohol and sweeter than otherwise. However, as long as you pitched enough healthy yeast and the fermentation was vigorous, you're unlikely to see any problems. Don't do anything at this point. The beer should ...


7

There is no reason to secondary that beer. Most homebrewers these days don't bother with secondary unless adding fruit or something else that will cause fermentation to restart. Here's what John Palmer, Jamil Zainisheff and others have to say...."Therefore I, and Jamil and White Labs and Wyeast Labs, do not recommend racking to a secondary fermenter for ...


7

Question 1 is hard to answer because its so dependent on the relative humidity and air flow of the room in question. I wouldn't assume an airlock with water would be safe for more than 4 weeks without checking on it or topping it off. Vodka is sometimes recommended as an airlock liquid, but I think its is a bad idea for long-term storage. Being roughly a 50/...


7

According to info I got from John Palmer for an upcoming article I wrote for BYO magazine, the cleanup happens concurrently with fermentation. Here's the quote..."Yeast have 3 phases in their life cycle: Adaptation, High Growth, and Stationary. (See Yeast by CW and Jamil) They do not have a maturation phase where they clean up byproducts. Adaptation phase ...


6

Some widely respected people advise against it, like: Racking to prevent autolysis is not necessary Whilst it might be true, in some cases, it is not true in case of strong stuff, stuff that will stay in fermenter long time. See wine resources - for yeast wine with nutrient is not so different than wort. And even if this particular part, this one reason ...


6

BE SURE to boil any water you add at this point to deoxygenate it. If you don't, the added water will oxidize your beer and promote faster staling.


6

When racking from a primary fermenter to a secondary vessel, you will leave behind a non-trivial amount of "stuff" so the volume in the secondary will be less than the volume in the primary. If you start with five gallons in the fermenter you won't have five gallons left to bottle, but it isn't any more concentrated than when you started. If your OG and FG ...


6

It is difficult to impossible to get much flavor out of watermelon due to its water content. There just isn't a of of flavor there to start with, and any sugars in the watermelon will be consumed by the yeast.


5

I believe it will be possible to add extra water to decrease the ABV but is it really necessary? If so I would get purified water and for a 43L batch add a few liters to decrease the ABV. Do this in the new carboy before racking the brew into it. If it was me I would leave it though. As mentioned by others without having the exact readings it is hard to say ...


5

At this point you don't know if the fermentation is stuck or finished. Despite the yeast attenuation rating, it's the fermentability of the wort that determines attenuation. Alcohol tolerance is not the problem. More yeast might help or it might not. Before you do anything you should try a fast ferment test to determine if there are any more fermentable ...


5

What you describe in your comments sounds like trub (pronounced "troob"). It's mostly yeast, proteins, fats, and sometimes hop material. It's totally normal for that stuff to settle to the bottom of the vessel after fermentation is complete. You don't filter it; you just let it settle and then carefully siphon the beer off while picking up as little of the ...


5

Give it some time. I had a stout take about a month before there was a decent head.


5

Like above, I've found corney kegs to be a great sealed aging container. Couple notes. I wouldn't allow any pressure in any glass carboy. Below is box from 6gal Italian glass carboy. ! PSI is pounds per square inch. Conditioning and secondary can easily make 2 bars, about 27psi. Because of the surface area a carboy would fail at a fraction of that. Plastic ...


5

You may be interested in Wood Toxicity and Allergen Chart presented at The Wood Database. With very important warning: Just because any given wood is not listed on the chart, does not mean that it is completely safe to use. It simply means that adverse reactions have not been reported as of yet. That said, there is over 200 kinds of wood in this one ...


5

You are leaving the time for the finings to bind the yeast together and then giving them time to drop to the bottom of your FV. If you leave this a week longer all that will happen is the finings will sit at the bottom holding onto your yeast. If you ever drop your beer into casks you can add finings and leave the cask sitting around for a month, the ...


5

CO2 in suspension will cause bubbles to come out of the airlock long after the fermentation is done. It is an indicator, but not a precise one. Experience will tell you that for a particular yeast/wine, fermentation takes, for instance, 5 days to complete if all parameters are identical. Again, it is not precise. You should get an hydrometer and mesure ...


4

You can dilute/blend your beer to diminish the ABV (and increase the volume). Brew Your Own magazine has a nice article on that.


4

You don't need to worry about "saving" the batch. Even if you left them in the fridge they'd still carb, just very slowly. It might take months. But there's absolutely nothing wrong with taking them out of the fridge for a couple weeks to carb, then returning them to the fridge once the process is complete.


4

Probably no need for a secondary vessel step with this. Depending on your fermentation temps up to this point you may not need to diacetyl rest this beer. California Lager yeast is generally fermented higher than standard lagers so the yeast may have cleaned that up by the time its done. I'd taste a sample of it to be sure. If you want to truly lager this ...


4

Here is a good test of what you are looking to do. http://brulosophy.com/2014/08/12/primary-only-vs-transfer-to-secondary-exbeeriment-results/ Here is the conclusion of the test: Once all the data was collected and I wasn’t worried about blowing through these kegs of beer, I started serving it to people stopping by. On a few occasions, with folks who ...


4

Yeast with a high floculation rate will do this, they usually break off the bottom and float up from trapped c02. Beer looks really clear, good job. When you rack to secondary, go ahead and let the floaters suck into the secondary, usually this is enough to break them up and let them settle. If you don't mind the extra loss you can leave them behind. ...


4

Oxygen in beer has to do with shelf life. A small amount of headspace is not going to effect the beer short term. I have secondary fermented plenty of 5 gallon batches in a 6.5 gallon fermenter with great results. I personally wouldn't go through the trouble of a bag liner especially if you are going to drink the beer within a couple months.


3

I would assume mostly for convenience, since it is likely easier to rack onto fruit than dump fruit into a primary vessel. Also, people are likely combining secondary fermentation with secondary for purposes of clarity. You would leave some trub behind (which also includes yeast) but there would be plenty of yeast in suspension for the secondary fermentation....


3

Secondary is generally not necessary. However, for an IIPA, dry hopping is crucial. Based on research done by Stan Hieronymous, I now rack to secondary before dry hopping. If you leave the beer on the yeast, there is an interaction between the hops and the yeast that increases the levels of gerianol and give it (what is to me) an unpleasant floral quality....


3

The yeast will still carbonate at fridge temperatures; just very slowly. Think months instead of weeks. I presume you put the beer in the fridge as you want to start trying to drink them. My advice would be to take your beer out of the fridge, and let them warm up to room temperature (65-75 degrees), and just stick them in a closet for a a few weeks. If you ...


3

Unless you were fermenting very cold or had a high starting gravity, I imagine fermentation was actually done after 7 days and the beer moved on to conditioning. The way to know is to measure the SG - signs such as airlock activity and kraeusen falling are not accurate ways to monitor the brew - the SG is the key here, and that will tell you when ...


3

An interesting point when considering initial and possible secondary fermenter: If we’re going to let the beer sit after its main fermentation is done, it pretty much needs to be in glass, and away from the spent yeast that accumulates at the bottom of your fermenter. - Secondary Fermentation, Pros and Cons. I am a noob focussing on IPA, and so far have ...


3

Most brewers yeast has a alcohol tolerance of at least 10%, so if your beer was around or under 10% then carbonation and conditioning will continue as normal. If your beer is pushing that limit check the tolerance of the yeast you used - some yeasts have a much higher alcohol tolerance, meaning you'll still be fine.


3

I think Secondary fermentation is a term that came over from wine making. Secondary fermentation in the wine world is where you have the malolactic fermentation happen. This is a bacteria not yeast and it reduces the malic (green apple) acids to lactic acids soften the wine. This usually is done in barrel storage.


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