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13

You can safely dilute at any stage. Contamination is probably the biggest risk. But just takes basic sanitation practices to avoid. Oxydation: Really only an issue if 50% or more of the alcohol is present. Just don't splash, use a tube to add water below the wort surface. Diacetyl: It isn't an "infection" it's produced by all yeast during growth phase but ...


8

I don't think lactose is desirable in a cream ale. Don't let the name fool you, cream ales have no cream or lactose or anything of the sort. They're basically American lager type beers fermented with ale yeast. Lactose would add sweetness and take away from the crisp finish most people would find desirable in this kind of beer. That's why the recipe calls ...


8

Regarding contamination, if you boil the water you are using to dilute and let it cool in a sanitised pot, then add it you should avoid bacterial or wild yeast contamination. At that OG (1080) don't worry about oxygen, if anything your yeast will need more of it due to the high starting gravity. When I do 1080+ beers, I often open the FV after 24H, to let ...


7

What you're doing is lagering the beer, so it would have the same benefits it has for a lager beer. Beer deteriorates much more slowly at cold temperatures. The only possible problem I know of is that after that much time you might not have enough yeast left in suspension to carbonate the beer in the bottle. If that's what you intend to do, it'd be a good ...


7

Yes, this is incorrect. You are actually conflating a couple of things, which can be all used in combination, and all of these combinations can be true. These are flavor, fermentation and time to make. Modern lagers are light in flavor, and do not take a long time to make. The breweries don't want much stock. There are lagers which have more flavor and ...


6

I agree with Tobias on more unfermentable sugars (high mash temp) and dextrine malts (carapils). I'm adding a separate answer because I've had good luck adding maltodextrin. Carapils, which is supposed to do the same thing, has given me somewhat inconsistent results - that is sometimes I notice it and sometimes I don't. People tend to use maltodextrin more ...


6

If you produce the same volume of beer with more malt, this will increase both alcohol and residual sweetness. It's the residual sweetness that will give it a heavier body. A couple other things you could try that won't affect the alcohol content as much: Mash at a higher temperature. Keeping the mash temperature close to 156 F. will lead the creation of ...


6

Mistake 1, really doesn't matter all will be fine. You may end up with a little more bitterness extraction, but is has been reported that FWH can lead to a more mellow bitterness. I really would not worry at all. Mistake 2, not really all should be fine You would get a cleaner flavour profile if you had used 2 packets of yeast,but your yeast should be ...


5

I'm not sure what you mean by a bucket, but what I have in my head is a 5G plastic bucket with a tap in it. If that's the case, no it will not work. You need to have some sort of container that can hold up under carbonation. The same thing with your ghetto way of bottle, they won't stand up to the carbonation. Personally, I like the 32oz EZTop bottles. ...


5

Basically what you've described is cold conditioning an ale, a fairly normal practice. It allows the beer to clarify and smooth, the same way it does with a lager. There is no need to let the beer warm before bottling. There's still plenty of yeast in it, and the yeast will become active once you add priming sugar and let the beer sit at room temp to ...


5

Adding pure sugar to any beer style does a few things. First, it increases the ABV. This is only an issue if it gets you an alcohol % that is noticeable in the flavor profile of the beer. Brown Ale certainly has no tolerance for any kind of warm alcohol flavor (unlike Barleywines, or big Belgians), so make sure your ABV doesn't go up past 7-8%. Second, it ...


5

It's probably just too cool. I had lots of problems with carbonation when I left my bottles in my 65-70 degree basement. In fact, I had one batch where the bottles on the concrete floor did not carbonate but the ones sitting on top of those, off the floor, did carbonate. Eventually, I started putting them in the laundry room on a shelf above the dryer, where ...


5

Don't use commercially produced Graham crackers, as these will contain unconvertible starches, oils, fats, preservatives, etc that can wreck your beer. Also, you can never assume that a finished flavor will transfer into a fermented product like that. I was on a quest once to get "graham cracker" flavor into a brown ale, and while I never got the perfect ...


5

Don't worry so much. Put some sanitized foil over the top and wrap with a rubber band. If the beer is chilled to pitching temp before being transferred to the fermenter, air locks are absolutely unnecessary to keep beer from being contaminated.


5

Bottle conditioning, not to be confused with bottle aging, is only for natural carbonation. You want to use a monosaccharide sugar like powdered corn sugar so it's easily and completely consumed by the yeast. Using DME, honey or anything more complex will leave unfermentable sugars and other compounds in the beer, resulting in flavor and mouthfeel changes....


5

I saw that "cidery due to too much simple sugar" issue mentioned in a few places, but for some weird reason I haven't experienced it, even though my bottling procedure always includes table (cane) sugar, and sometimes a lot (e.g. for belgians). I remember at least in one place (can't remember who was the author, though) I've read that "cidery due to too much ...


4

I've had success using 3-5 lbs of fresh ginger in a 5 gallon batch of ginger soda. I find it's important to very finely cut the ginger (I use a strong blender/food processor). Once I've simmered the ginger for about 15-30 minutes, I strain the pulp into a grain sock and squeeze as much liquid as possible from it. I use my hands to do the pressing (warning:...


4

If you add near boiling water to fermenting wort, then yes, you can definitely kill some of the yeast, at least, any yeast that come in contact with that near boiling water. If there was enough yeast in the fermenter, distributed in other parts of the beer, then a lot of it may still be alive. If you see signs of fermentation (bubbling airlock, krausen) it ...


4

First of all, it's highly unlikely that the beer will be ready to drink in 8 days, no matter what the instructions say. In general, it's more like a month. But you can try it and see what you think. That gives you plenty of time to order bottles. You could easily leave your beer in the fermenter for a month or more and you'd likely be better off for it. ...


4

No, the brew is not ruined. It's actually quite a small amount of sugar, and that will have been fermented out now, assuming it was sitting at room temperature (at least 15°C/59°F) Simply add the same quantity of sugar again and bottle. One thing that may have happened with the delay is the beer may have picked up a yeast bite if it's still sitting ...


4

Carbonation I agree with @Sander's recommendation to use an online priming sugar calculator. I respectfully disagree that carbonating in bottles is an art -- it is repeatable science. One way to get close enough to moderately carbonated beer, but not necessarily precisely what the styles calls for, is to use carbonation drops, Coopers tabs, Prime Tabs, etc....


4

I routinely do this. Namely because of time constraints as well. My normal brewing process involves brewing once a month. So when brewing the next batch I am tending to the previous batch which was fermented and then crash for a month.


4

This could be bad for the beer that's in there now. If fermentation vessel doesn't have a good seal the beer could be contaminated. It's not guaranteed to spoil though, it might turn out ok. It is also possible that if you mess with the seal now, you could accidentally introduce contamination that wouldn't have taken hold otherwise. Without knowing more of ...


4

Two weeks doesn't seem like an inordinately long time for a true double IPA. Also depending on the OG 1.019 might be the bottom. As this was an extract beer I'd be surprised to see a double IPA go to 1.010; unless this is something you've brewed before and gotten to that point. I'd say warm it up to 70-72F and give it another week. Stirring, IMO, is a ...


4

I would add the ingredients in late fermentation. When there is plenty of alcohol, minimal co2 blow off, but still active yeast. This will allow the yeast to consume those sugars, dominate the culture and preserve your flavor and aromatics of the adjucts. Especially if the ingredients have fermentable sugars. Adding more sugars after fermentation has ...


4

I always recommend adding non fermentable flavorings as close to packaging as possible. This helps prevent that flavor and aroma from getting "blown out" by fermentation.


4

For an American Pale Ale, I'd stick with American hops. Saaz is the classic Czech Pilsner hop, Hallertau is a German noble hop. If you use those, you may end up with something between a Pale Ale and a Czech or German Pilsner respectively. I just had a Azacca SMASH and that was great, so my personal favorite would be an Azacca pale ale.


4

That beer definitely needs more time. It's likely that the periods of lower temperature slowed or potentially even halted fermentation, and the sweet smell you describe is probably unfermented sugars in the wort. You just need to warm that brew up a bit (19°C as you've said there is perfect) and wait another couple of days at least. At best, bottling now ...


3

Also check out Clarity Ferm. Its not FDA approved to reduce to FDA's definition of "Gluten Free", but it will typically drop out enough glutens (almost all of them) to avoid reaction unless it is a really serious/intense allergy if I understand correctly. This way you can avoid brewing with sorgum, quinoa, and other equivalent PITAs, and just make any ...


3

There are many resources out there for GF home brewing. I made a quick search and I found some good recipes and information, unfortunately I can't post more than two links.. http://www.glutenfreehomebrewing.org


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