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Diluting beer after 11 hours of fermentation. What to expect?

You can safely dilute at any stage. Contamination is probably the biggest risk. But just takes basic sanitation practices to avoid. Oxydation: Really only an issue if 50% or more of the alcohol is ...
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8 votes
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Amount of lactose (or milk?) to make a real 'Cream Ale',

I don't think lactose is desirable in a cream ale. Don't let the name fool you, cream ales have no cream or lactose or anything of the sort. They're basically American lager type beers fermented with ...
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8 votes

Diluting beer after 11 hours of fermentation. What to expect?

Regarding contamination, if you boil the water you are using to dilute and let it cool in a sanitised pot, then add it you should avoid bacterial or wild yeast contamination. At that OG (1080) don't ...
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  • 6,993
7 votes
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Long cold crash for an ale. Benefit or harm?

What you're doing is lagering the beer, so it would have the same benefits it has for a lager beer. Beer deteriorates much more slowly at cold temperatures. The only possible problem I know of is ...
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  • 1,432
7 votes
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Lager vs Ale a comparison

Yes, this is incorrect. You are actually conflating a couple of things, which can be all used in combination, and all of these combinations can be true. These are flavor, fermentation and time to ...
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  • 3,615
6 votes

Making a strong belgian ale

Mistake 1, really doesn't matter all will be fine. You may end up with a little more bitterness extraction, but is has been reported that FWH can lead to a more mellow bitterness. I really would not ...
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  • 6,993
5 votes

Flat beer with table sugar?

It's probably just too cool. I had lots of problems with carbonation when I left my bottles in my 65-70 degree basement. In fact, I had one batch where the bottles on the concrete floor did not ...
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  • 1,432
5 votes

Adding graham cracker flavor to a pumpkin ale

Don't use commercially produced Graham crackers, as these will contain unconvertible starches, oils, fats, preservatives, etc that can wreck your beer. Also, you can never assume that a finished ...
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  • 6,682
5 votes

Problems with sealing fermentation tank

Don't worry so much. Put some sanitized foil over the top and wrap with a rubber band. If the beer is chilled to pitching temp before being transferred to the fermenter, air locks are absolutely ...
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  • 363
5 votes
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Unexpected flavours after bottle conditioning

Bottle conditioning, not to be confused with bottle aging, is only for natural carbonation. You want to use a monosaccharide sugar like powdered corn sugar so it's easily and completely consumed by ...
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5 votes
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Cidery or wine flavor after bottle conditioning ale

I saw that "cidery due to too much simple sugar" issue mentioned in a few places, but for some weird reason I haven't experienced it, even though my bottling procedure always includes table (cane) ...
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  • 1,488
4 votes

Ale is cloudy and really fizzy

Carbonation I agree with @Sander's recommendation to use an online priming sugar calculator. I respectfully disagree that carbonating in bottles is an art -- it is repeatable science. One way to get ...
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  • 2,947
4 votes

Long cold crash for an ale. Benefit or harm?

I routinely do this. Namely because of time constraints as well. My normal brewing process involves brewing once a month. So when brewing the next batch I am tending to the previous batch which was ...
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  • 36.2k
4 votes

Problems with sealing fermentation tank

This could be bad for the beer that's in there now. If fermentation vessel doesn't have a good seal the beer could be contaminated. It's not guaranteed to spoil though, it might turn out ok. It is ...
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  • 933
4 votes
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Should I stir the fermentation?

Two weeks doesn't seem like an inordinately long time for a true double IPA. Also depending on the OG 1.019 might be the bottom. As this was an extract beer I'd be surprised to see a double IPA go ...
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  • 36.2k
4 votes
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Adding extra ingredients/flavouring: what stage should I add?

I would add the ingredients in late fermentation. When there is plenty of alcohol, minimal co2 blow off, but still active yeast. This will allow the yeast to consume those sugars, dominate the culture ...
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4 votes

Adding extra ingredients/flavouring: what stage should I add?

I always recommend adding non fermentable flavorings as close to packaging as possible. This helps prevent that flavor and aroma from getting "blown out" by fermentation.
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  • 33.3k
4 votes
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Any hop recommendations for a single hop PA out of these options

For an American Pale Ale, I'd stick with American hops. Saaz is the classic Czech Pilsner hop, Hallertau is a German noble hop. If you use those, you may end up with something between a Pale Ale and ...
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  • 1,226
4 votes
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Didn't reach expected FG. Should I postpone bottling? Also: It looks weird!

That beer definitely needs more time. It's likely that the periods of lower temperature slowed or potentially even halted fermentation, and the sweet smell you describe is probably unfermented sugars ...
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  • 56
3 votes
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did I rack to secondary fermentation too early?

Probably not. Typically people rack to secondary once most signs of active fermentation are done in the primary fermenter. 1.022 seems too high for primary to be completely done, but it's impossible ...
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3 votes
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Carbonation gone wrong?

A week might not be long enough (especially if your yeast is particularly beleaguered, which would depend mostly on what the ABV of the finished beer is and how long it's been since fermentation). ...
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3 votes

Ale is cloudy and really fizzy

I think the most likely cause is not overpriming, but that you bottled it too soon. Even at as high a temperature as you used, it's pretty unlikely that the beer was finished fermenting in 6 days. ...
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  • 33.3k
3 votes

Flat beer with table sugar?

If you saw a beer head during the 2nd fermentation, you likely just let the beer get too cold. Ales tend to like 70F+ bottle fermenting conditions. You can tell if your beer's yeast has died by the ...
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3 votes

What makes a beer syrupy in texture?

Generally the temperature of the mash can give a thicker consistency to the beer as you move from 63-68 degC for you mash temperature the high you go the more dominant alpha-amylase will be. This ...
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  • 6,993
3 votes
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What makes a beer syrupy in texture?

Using today's highly modified malts, mash temp makes a lot less difference than it used it. I'd say it's the rye. I have made many, many rye beers and as the % of rye rises, the beer gets a thicker, ...
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  • 33.3k
3 votes
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Controlling fermentation temperatures

I live in the south of England where it has recently been even colder than "oop North". At this time of year I go with the seasons and brew the year's supply of lager(!!!). Its perfectly lagered and ...
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  • 5,611
3 votes

Recipe simply calls for caramalt

No Caramalt is its own thing: https://bsgcraftbrewing.com/simpsons-caramalt https://bsgcraftbrewing.com/crisp-cara-malt-15-25-kg It typically comes in around 15°L, so any crystal/caramel malt in ...
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3 votes
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Brewing with chili pepper

There are many commercial examples of beers using chilli peppers. Most chilli beers tend to be dark ales, like porters and stouts. The roasted flavor of the malts pairs really well with chilli flavor ...
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3 votes

Diluting beer after 11 hours of fermentation. What to expect?

At what gravity did it started and what was it when the water was added? If the fermentation only just started and still has a long way to go, oxidation would most likely not be a problem. Also the ...
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