Hot answers tagged

12

Mason jars are designed to retain a vacuum seal, not keep outward pressure in. Chances are it may hold the pressure up to a certain point before the actual seal on the lid fails, but the glass itself is not tempered glass, and therefor is not designed to withstand the pressures of bottle conditioning. Bottle conditioning inside of mason jars may easily ...


7

If stored properly (no humidity and at room temperature or lower) the DME should preserve itself at least for a year. It has been discussed before: How long will an extract kit stay good? In your case, if the seal was good, after a month it should still be fresh and you can use it without concerns... Manufacturers will mention that "Storing opened bags ...


6

It will be safe to drink - beer doesn't go bad in a way that can cause illness. If it will taste good or not is another thing altogether!


6

Warmer temperatures will allow the yeast to continue its work, cleaning up the beer. Colder temperatures will promote yeast flocculation which helps to clear the beer. It'd suggest leaving the beer in the fermentation temperature range for a week or two after the final gravity has been reached, and then moving it to the cooler basement to help it clear.


5

Don't pin it. This is a cask practice, but not necessary in your corny keg and will reduce the carbonation. In fact, you can prime it (fully sealed), wait 14 days, put it in the fridge and tap it in a few hours; the pressure built up during priming will let it flow, at least for a gallon or two. After which, if you can't put CO2 on it, prime it again and ...


5

Don't Do It The Mason Jars can withstand the pressure inside a pressure cooker, because the jars are usually sanitised with lids open (so steam goes everywhere) in the pressure cooker. The pressure is surrounding the glass, on the inside and the outside of the jar, acting ON the glass, the system (within the cooker) is balanced. With bottling, the pressure ...


5

It's fairly safe to say that bottle conditioning at -5°c will not yield good results. Even high ABV beers stored below freezing will form ice crystals and force a separation of the water and ethanol. (Eisbock) While many yeasts can survive freezing temperatures the become dormant or have their metabolism slowed down so much they no longer perform useful ...


4

This is a super old thread but I had to deal with this recently and I was very happy with my results. Living in a walk-up second story apartment in Chicago, space being limited I purchased one of these Ikea BRIMNES wardrobes. As a 5 gallon + 1 gallon extract brewer, this fit all of my equipment perfectly, gave my carboys a nice quiet place to sit during ...


4

I was very excited to see what the community had to offer for this problem as I am in need of a cardboard box replacement as well. Unfortunately, it appears that www.cwcrate.com is out of business. Therefore, I continued to search for a solution. I found the following sets of plans to make wooden crates: set 1 -- enclosed box: these look really nice, but ...


4

I bulk prime with DME, so it takes me 3 to 6 months to use a 1kg bag. I reseal the bag quickly, and place it in an airtight plastic container after pouring out the amount I require. No observable deterioration takes place.


4

My ginger beer SCOBY has grown in a jar for over 9 years. If kept hydrated and fed (with ginger and sugar and occasional fresh lemon juice) it seems to keep well enough. If I do not produce/bottle ginger beer for a time then I rinse the SCOBY monthly (or so) and replace the old water which removes any build up of by-products. I still use the orginal "plant" ...


4

Yeah sure, I don't see why not. The hops are probably not sinking as easy as the steak, but it will still work if you be careful enough. But also I'm thinking that you won't notice a difference between a bag that contains 2% O2 and another one (without the water displacement method) that contains 20%. Are you going to freeze the hops afterwards?


4

Actually using plastic bags period is bad, because they are permeable (small molecules can pass through) So even submerging the bag to vacate air really won't do much good. You're better off investing in a Mylar bagger, or using mason jars purged with nitro or c02. Update: I simply just use a straw to suck out as much air as possible and reseal the Mylar ...


4

No it does not. When it comes to screw caps, the things important to keep away from aging wine in a screwcap bottle are light, heat and motion. If oxygen can't penetrate the cap, how could humidity? Just keep it out of light and keep it cool.


3

Google for polystyrene wine storage. Those containers are great for shipping beer and you can get them in various sized. When you have your container get bubble wrap and place a double layer of bubble wrap in the bottom of each pocket. Cool your beer to close to 0C (32F), Don't worry, it won't freeze. Just before shipping, remove the beers from the fridge ...


3

All you can really do is ensure that your fermentation, sanitation and bottling practices are as sound as possible. You should (as you seem to) definitely expect that your beer will see the worst conditions you could think of, chiefly: heat and cold (and rapid and frequent swings between the two); and near-constant agitation. To combat this, you'll want to ...


3

I started off brewing in a dorm room. If you bottle in 12 oz bottles it is more work, but they'll fit under a bed (or at least the one we had). You can easily fit batches of beer under there. Another good option is the bottom of the closet and stack things on top. For both, I like to keep them in the 24 bottle boxes you purchase new ones from.


3

DME loves to suck up humidity and turn to a brick of sugar if it can. What I do is cut the corner off the DME bag. Using a large mouth plastic bottle (gatorade) cut the top off 1 inch from the cap. Remove the lid and stuff the cut corner of the DME bag up through and fold back. Replace the cap for a nice airtight seal. Then I store the DME with my ...


3

Most all lagers if you can lager for months you can have some great beer. Fruit Cream Ales are nice for summer, can be done as ales or lagers, often mixed fermentation with both ale and Lager yeasts. Steer away from hoppy beers as this flavor and aroma is first to fade with age. Brew these in the final weeks of your events. Malty beers meld great with ...


3

Doubtful It is remotely possible for yeast packs to have microbes on the outside of packaging from contamination at packing time. I don't see it contaminating unopened beers though. Most likely the beer has just aged and changed in flavor as all beers do.


3

No matter how careful you are, you can pick up a wild yeast infection and wind up w/ gushers and bottle bombs. They do explode w/ some force--enough to cause minor injuries for sure--but a regular plastic storage container would contain it. I think the worst you would see is the glass exploding w/ enough force to damage the container but it would still ...


3

Beer should be stored cool. Around 7°C (45°F), never colder than 3°C (37°F) [#1]. Charles Bamforth says that every extra 10°C (50°F) of temperature doubles the rate of beer aging. So when your beer is sitting at 30°C it's aging very quickly! Limiting oxygen in the packaged beer will really help with beer preservation. But if your weather gets really hot ...


3

I had a half kilo pack of US-05 in the freezer for about 2 years, and it was always fine. Just seal it up as best as you can between uses.


3

After some research I think I discovered a potential source of the problem. Potassium metabisulfite decomposes into, amongst other compounds, sulphur dioxide - a gas which is irritating and toxic at higher concentrations. SO2 reacts with water to form sulphuric acid (nasty!), and that includes water in mucus membranes, which explains why I experienced a a ...


2

Wyeast liquid yeast has a 6 months warranty shelf life. http://www.wyeastlab.com/rw_advantage.cfm Danstar dry yeast comes with a 2 years guaranteed shelf life, if stored properly. http://www.danstaryeast.com/articles/dry-yeast-storage Fermentis claims their dry yeast is viable for 2 years from the date of manufacture, as long as the yeast is stored ...


2

I don't see why it wont be ok to drink. There is nothing wrong with opening one and trying a little bit to see how it tastes. If it tastes all good then put the rest in the fridge and enjoy.


2

I've found that my ginger bug is heartier than I gave it credit for. I was making a batch of Ginger Beer just about every 7-10 days after I first cultured the bug, and was feeding it after every batch. I'd let it sit on the counter for 24 hours after feeding to come up to temp, allow the yeasties to consume some of the fresh sugar, and then I'd pop it back ...


2

Mead generally ages very well and some of the best glasses I've had are from bottles that somebody forgot about. (The only reason I've never had a mead that's more than ten years old is that it's hard to resist drinking a bottle that's seven years old.) Even unfermented honey is good several years later, and many meads take several years to develop their ...


2

It depends on what type of malt but assuming you are looking at base malts this should be accurate, It's directly from Briess's website referring to 2 row pale malt. Darker roasted malts will differ somewhat. STORAGE AND SHELF LIFE Store in a temperate, low humidity, pest free environment at temperatures of <90 ºF. Improperly stored malts are prone ...


2

MBT (3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol) happens real quick. People have reported Heineken bottles skunking when in direct sunlight in less than 15 minutes. Heineken has a minor defense of green tinted bottles, clear obviously has less. An hour in an ice bucket outside would most certainly skunk any beer in a green or clear bottle. Since MBT is caused primarily ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible