Hot answers tagged

12

The main difference is the yeast, Ale is brewed with a top fermenting yeast s.cerevisiae[1] whereas Lager is brewed with a bottom fermenting yeast s.pastorianus[2]. From this comes the fermentation temperature, ales are fermented at higher temperatures(14-20 C) than lager(10-12 C). A lager you would also allow to warm towards the end of the primary ...


8

I would get hold of another sachet of yeast as a backup. If you have a local homebrew store, almost any type of yeast will work for this kit, but I'd recommend Safale US-05 if you can get that, since that will give you a cleaner profile. If they have liquid yeasts, then Wyeast 1056 or White Labs WLP001 will produce equivalent results. Once you've got hold of ...


7

Yes, this is incorrect. You are actually conflating a couple of things, which can be all used in combination, and all of these combinations can be true. These are flavor, fermentation and time to make. Modern lagers are light in flavor, and do not take a long time to make. The breweries don't want much stock. There are lagers which have more flavor and ...


6

In addition to Mr_Roads answer. Lager yeast is unique from ale yeast in that it can breakdown and use melibiose, which is a sugar not fermentable by ale yeasts. This is one reason lagers are generally "cleaner" in mouth feel and residual sweetness over ales with the same recipe.


5

As a long-time practitioner of this method, I'd recommend waiting longer than this article suggests. For me, the real benefit of the technique is an accelerated reduction of diacetyl at the end of fermentation, since by the time esters have maxed out (more on that below) pretty much all other potential off-flavors (higher alcohols, acetaldehyde, sulfur ...


5

Clarity and poly-phenol/tannins pretty much nails it. Lager yeast do tend to be weaker flocculators than ale yeasts, so more time at cold temp helps clear things up. I brewed up an all Munich malt beer with German Lager yeast. It tasted so good after a 4 week primary that I kept drinking it during "lagering" and it was gone before the lager period was ...


5

I did some research and found there actually are a number of factors influencing the production of sulfur dioxide (SO2) specifically (as opposed to H2S or DMS) that can be controlled: SO2 production is favored by higher original gravity. Basically this is because sulfite synthesis by yeast requires energy and more energy available as fermentable sugar means ...


5

There are kits with call themselves "lager" kits, but if you make them with the yeast provided and at the temperatures suggested, they will not produce a true lager beer. The beer they produce might taste quite similar to a light lager, but they will be ales. They would probably fit into one of these (2015) BJCP categories: 1C Cream Ale 18A Blonde Ale I'...


5

Simply put, there are two overarching umbrellas in beer... ales and lagers. An IPA is an ale. GENERALLY speaking all beers fit under one of these two umbrellas. Once under one of these umbrellas the main difference is brewing technique. Even if you use the exact same ingredients and technique between a beer with ale yeast and the other with lager yeast, one ...


5

Many websites can provide recipes. Take a look at some other posts like : Recipe websites catering to beginners? But since you already have a recipe, you just need to lower the ABV a little, take a look here: Low ABV stout recipe Basically, you can add just add little more water (15% to 25%) to your recipe to achieve lower ABV.


4

Probably no need for a secondary vessel step with this. Depending on your fermentation temps up to this point you may not need to diacetyl rest this beer. California Lager yeast is generally fermented higher than standard lagers so the yeast may have cleaned that up by the time its done. I'd taste a sample of it to be sure. If you want to truly lager this ...


4

It sounds like you underpitched by quite a large amount. As for options, you have some: Pitch an ale yeast. You'll want to bring the temperature up to at least 17 C to keep the yeast happy. You'll end up with an ale, not a lager, but still a good beer. Raise the temperature for a short while. If you can bring the temperature up to 15 C, you should start to ...


4

Bottom cropping yeasts are easier to rouse out of dormancy with higher temps than top cropping yeasts. I'd say that, even now, warming the fermenter up to 58 for the diacetyl rest would be totally appropriate and doable. I don't know that the time component is really important, unless it'd been so long that all the yeast was dead, and I don't think that's ...


4

They sure have, at least in terms of the temperature/ABV% relationship. The table provided is for pure ethanol/water solutions so the freezing points provided will be slightly higher than for actual beer. Accounting for the effects of residual sugar, proteins and other things in solution seems incredibly complex; this is touched upon in some detail later in ...


4

Yes, priming sugar is usually added to the carboy or bottling bucket just prior to bottling for ease. However there are "carbonation drops" you can alternately add to each bottle. These are just sugar. You can add more yeast, but it's generally not needed. No, glass carboys are not designed to hold any pressure. Yes, the beer will be flat unless fermentaion ...


4

Usually its fine. There's plenty of yeast around for carbonate, but it will take longer. You should still be bottle conditioning at 60-70F to get the carbonation to happen. If you lager a beer for a real long time, say months, a dose of yeast may help. One way to do this is to just rack some of the settled yeast along for the ride as you transfer the ...


4

In general, fermenting lager yeast at room temperatures would result in off flavors due to esters, diacetyl, and other components. The "California Common" is an exception to this, and the standard explanation is that the yeast strain (Wyeast 2112 or WLP810) used for this style of beer can handle higher temperatures than most lager strains. Who knows, however,...


3

Based on my experience, you'll have more than enough yeast to carb. I've lagered beer for 2-3 months and still had plenty. If you really feel that you need to add yeast, any neutral yeast will be fine. I tend to use US05 becasue it's inexpensive, easy and reliable. You use so little that it has no effect on flavor, so you don't need a lager yeast.


3

To fix this beer, I would raise the temperature to 55F and leave it for another couple of weeks. Assuming sanitation is good the beer will be ok. 1.7l is on the small side even for a stirred starter for a 1.060 lager, and airation doesn't provide the dissolved oxygen levels needed. (ca. 15ppm.) In future, aim for a 4-5l starter and yeast nutrient. If you ...


3

Given their additional experiments of testing lagers fermented entirely at warmer temperatures, it would seem the answer is because the lager yeasts being used simply do not produce estery flavors or other off flavors at temperatures suitable for non-lager yeasts (60s and 70s). It would seem the lager yeast is what makes the difference between a lager and ...


3

In general, you need to start preparing for temp controlled fermentation as well as good yeast management practices. That includes starters and learning to pitch more yeast that you would for a normal ale. A good alternative to lager brewing is to start with styles like Kolsch or American Cream Ale. These beers usually are light in color and flavor and ...


3

Yes, the process sounds reasonable, at least to an extent. The purpose of storing them at room temp is to allow refermentation to create carbonation. Then, ideally, you would keep them at 32-35 for two months to allow the beer to lager and the flavor to smooth out. An even better course of action would be to transfer to a secondary, keep that at 32-35 for ...


3

Yes, if you switch your freezer on and off in quick succession the compressor gives up the ghost and you have a box that can actually turn into a semi-oven. Good news! thermostats like the STC-1000 have a timer (that you can set) that tells it not to power on/off within that period. I have mine set to 10 minutes. When you buy a temp control device, just ...


3

Here's a quote from homebrewing.org... There are two important processes at work when a beer is in long-term cold-storage: Precipitation: Take a certain amount of liquid, warm it up, and you can obviously dissolve more solids into that same volume. Take that same warm liquid, and cool it down, and the amount of dissolved solids that it can contain will ...


3

You should be fine. The results are really to lager strain dependent. That said, I have made several lagers that were great and ready to drink without a true lager phase. (Not to say they didn't get better as things went alone in the kegorator.) You should really let your palate be your guide. If it tastes great but the process didn't go along according ...


3

Absolutely! I've got a shed behind my house which I call "the lagering shed". You should know the range of temperatures which are likely to occur, and keep an eye on your beer. I live in south-western British Colombia, where winter temperatures are great for outdoor lagering. We sometimes go a bit below zero, but usually not much below, and usually not ...


2

The warmer temperature should not make this problem worse. I'd let it sit for up to 48 hours and taste it again. I wouldn't bottle yet. Bottling (and conditioning in general) helps many beers but you'll waste 12 ounces at a time just to taste if you bottle it now.


2

@nhunsaker this sounds pretty standard to me. Most instructions on a beer kit will get you to prime the bottles with sugar for carbonation, then to store them in a warmer place so the carbonation process can start to take place. Then you are told to leave the bottles for two weeks in a cooler place. After that you can put them in the fridge then drink them....


2

You're making a real lager, so try to keep the temps as low as possible - around 50F/10C would be about ideal. (The fermentation will raise temperature this by about 6F/3C.) But if you don't and let it warm up, it will still be a lager - it's because of the yeast - S-23 is a true lager strain (Saccaromyces pastorianus). Lager yeast tend to produce sulphur -...


2

He mentions it in the linked article: A few things we’ve learned over the last couple centuries of brewing is that yeast generally works slower at cooler temperatures and faster at warmer temperatures, most esters and phenolics are produced during the growth phase of fermentation, which in my experience lasts about 4-5 days for lager strains, and beer ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible