11

Thick mouthfeel and body can come from a few sources and even more methods to manipulate them. Most how to brew books have an entire section dedicated to the topic. But here's some bullet points to piont you in the right direction for further reading. Thicker body is from protients, unfermentables and starch. Protiens: These are manipulated with the grain ...


10

It really depends on what you're after. Traditionally, dried bitter orange peel is added late in the boil for bitterness. Dried or fresh sweet orange peel can be added late in the boil for a bit of flavor, and fresh sweet orange peel can be added to the secondary for aroma. So, you need to think about and define what it is you want the orange peel to do ...


9

To quote from http://www.wyeastlab.com/hb_oxygenation.cfm: It was concluded that pumping compressed air through a stone is not an efficient way to provide adequate levels of DO. Traditional splashing and shaking, although laborious, is fairly efficient at dissolving up to 8 ppm oxygen. To increase levels of oxygen, the carboy headspace can be purged with ...


9

For cleaning, I rinse bottles with hot water immediately after pouring them out into my glass. They don't need any sort of washing with soap at that point. I keep them off to the side until I have a whole bunch ready for de-labeling, which is an overnight soak in a sink full of PBW. Most labels just slide right off the next day. A quick rinse and the bottles ...


9

I give fermentation 4-5 days at 63°F, then bump up the temp to 70-72°F for maybe another 3 days. Then I crash to 33°F for 3-5 days until the beer clears.


8

In my experience it can differ between maltsters, but Weyermann offers both PDF and video instructions on opening their bags (the video is pretty awesome), which are fairly applicable to other brands of malt. ~edit~ There's also this video. ~another edit~ My own personal method for this, which I find works pretty much 100% of the time, with any bag: ...


7

Likely late in the game now, but you can also put oak chips on a sanitized cooking sheet at 200F or so and leave in the oven for 15 minutes or so. This will sanitize the chips, and subtly brings out some of the flavour, but not too much tannic or other astringent flavours. Essentially you are pasteurizing the oak chips by heating them to 138F (min), before ...


7

First, happy National Homebrew Day celebration day. I hope you have a LHBS or club that is participating in the Big Brew. Gravity is a measure of sugar in your wort, and the more fermentable sugars you give your yeast to munch on, the more that yeast will pee alcohol. To get gravity without booze, you provide yeast more of the stuff they can’t consume. ...


7

I am not sure exactly what you are defining as efficient, so I am going to answer this assuming time efficiency is your primary goal. Denny's advice is good advice for a general approach without having to faff around checking things, and will ferment all but the largest brews to FG. I would suggest you take daily samples and gravity readings. As soon as ...


7

This is caused by a drop in temp before co2 is being produced. Just cap the fermenter in sanitized foil until you're past the lag phase, or cooled to fermentaion temp. Though a little bit of starsan won't hurt much, foil is better than an open airlock IMO. I don't put air locks on until the wort is at fermentaion temp. I also remove the airlock then foil ...


7

From Brewtarget (brewing software): Mash hopping: adding hop in the mash First wort: adding hop in the boiling kettle and then lautering the wort in the kettle Boil: Adding hop when the wort boils, at different times Aroma: apparently adding hops after flameout, also called hop stand Dry hop of course, which is for someone who starts with brewing rather ...


6

Commercial breweries use two main types of labels: Glue labels, and Sticker-type labels. Glue labels are easy to remove by soaking in percarbonate based cleansers (OxyClean, Easy Clean, B-Brite, One Step, PBW, and others). You can also use water plus Ammonia, or just plain hot water. Some scraping may be required for complete removal. Glue labels are most ...


6

Getting the Labels Off I'm only adding a little bit here. I only use OxyClean, like many others, but what I do is put the bottles standing up in a cooler, then fill them with hot tap water. Dump a bit of oxyclean in the cooler, and fill it with hot water. It holds the temp for quite a long while, after a couple of hours the labels are floating off, or they ...


6

If you're looking to add real fruit to any brew you'll want to do so in secondary to get the most flavor. I've had really good success in taking my fruit of choice and pureeing it in a food processor with little vodka - about 1/4 cup per 2lb of fruit seems a good balance. The vodka will help kill off any additional bugs that may have made it past washing ...


6

I don't use hop bags anymore (unless in the keg!) but when I did, I usually tied a piece of dental floss to the bag. I would whipe the floss with 70% Isopropyl Alcohol first, I'm sure your sanitizing agent will do the trick. Use glass beads as weights, sink the bag to where you want it, leaving the floss hanging out the top and insert the bung/ stopper! The ...


6

14% would be pretty high, even for high gravity yeasts, but 11% is definitely realistic. There are a few tricks to getting high ABV. You want really good aeration so that the yeast are healthy, often this means aerating when pitching and again the day after. You also may want to add sugar slowly instead of putting it all in at once. This is easy with ...


6

You'll get the best flavor if you use whole, and coarsely crack it before adding.


6

"How safe would that beer be?" If it's steam coming from a commercial appliance (presumably a dish-washer or some other such food-grade device) it wouldn't be any less safe than eating off a dish that came through it. What you might see is a small carry-over of that plastic-y scent into your beer from residuals left after draining. Unsafe? No. Inappropriate ...


6

I don't think it's a good idea, but might depend on product. You know why brown bottles are more popular than green or clear? Because light creates bad flavor and aroma in most beers. In my country it's known as skunks aroma. Strong UV lamp will do the same, only much faster. As far as I know, wine doesn't like light either. But I believe there might be some ...


6

Make sure you have a healthy yeast in the proper pitch amount. Ferment primary at the cold end of the yeast strains tolerance. A long secondary / aging helps break down fusel alcohols. Yeast needs nutrients and oxygen mainly for their growth phase. This can be substituted by pitching a massive amount of yeast. For example pitching wort on top of a yeast ...


6

I'd collect: The recipe: grain bill, hops and their times, adjuncts and their times, amount of water. That way you can try to recreate the same beer if it was good. You can tweak any of grain bill, hops, timing, and so on to see how the beer changes. Once you get more advanced, take other readings: You already mentioned gravity. When you brew all-grain, ...


6

Here's a couple reading I find important that many over look. All-grain. Mash pH is very important. Doing an iodine test during the mash is a good practice to check if conversion is done. Why mash for 90 min if it's done at 45? Water chemistry. Most home brewers build thier own profile from RO. Then many have great local water. Knowing what's in it will ...


6

If you are fermenting in a chest freezer, I don't think oxygen will be a problem for you. Just after you pitch, you want as much oxygen you can get in solution. When fermentation begins in earnest, the produced CO2 will displace not only the oxygen in the carboy/bucket, but also in the chest freezer. In my freezer, I have to be very careful not to stick ...


5

Oxygenating the Wort and use of Yeast (Micro)Nutrients This made a noticeable difference to my beers, especially those over 1.070.


5

Like Tobias said, corn is made mostly of starch and lack any enzymes which can convert the starch to fermentable sugars. Since you are asking for stove top, I am going to assume DME/LME and the corn will just be your adjunct. However, if you are just going for corn, you will just need a lot of it. So back to your question! Yes, you can does this on stove ...


5

A good article from Brew Your Own. "Tastes Great! Less Alcohol!" Then there is the style guidelines which includes commercial examples. 2008 BJCP Style Guidelines Category 8 — English Pale Ale


5

Ginger juice alone does not have enough sugar to be fermentable. However, ginger beer is a popular, slightly alcoholic beverage made from ginger root, sugar, water and citric acid. Take a look at this question and answer.


5

Follow the instructions. Not all adjuncts are suitable for "no boil" brew. Adjuncts could have microbes that may be dormant without oxygen and need the boil to kill them. Also the recipe may need some boil off to get the OG right.


5

IMHO there is too much "all grain brewing tehcnique" being used in an extract brew process. There is no particular need to steep the grains at 70C. They are providing some flavours and body to the final beer, The grains are not malted so have no diastatic power to convert starch to sugars - as standard barley malt might do. Flaked wheat might help in head ...


5

You do have the answer in your question. When brewing my first kit, I put the sugar in each bottle and here is my experience: Have to measure sugar for each bottle, difficult and time consuming when using different sizes. I did experience gushing when filling bottles that had sugar in them I did get a few bottles that where not as good (due to sugar not ...


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