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11

weigh your priming sugar, don't measure the volume boil it in just enough water to dissolve it for a few minutes pour that sugar syrup into your bottling bucket rack the beer onto the sugar mixture give it a couple gentle stirs with a sanitized spoon That works for me. Hopefully it will work for you, too!


10

Yes. Priming with sugar would break the reinheitsgeboten. The way you want to go is to retain unfermented mash and add it when bottling takes place. There's a really handy calculator right here: https://www.brewersfriend.com/gyle-and-krausen-priming-calculator/


9

Most of the priming sugar available at homebrew shops is finely granulated dextrose/corn sugar. It can be confused with; but it is not confectioners sugar. Most confectioners sugar contains anti-caking agents in it, like cornstarch or silicates. Neither of these are necessarily good for your beer. I stopped buying "priming sugar" from the shop and ...


8

You will need to add priming sugar if the beer has reached its terminal gravity with the yeast being used. In this example, despite the 80% attenuation the remaining 20% is not usually fermentable sugars. Its comprised of protein, dextrans and other molecules in solution that are largely ignored by your primary yeast strain. Lastly, reported attenuation ...


8

Using sorbate is the only way to have a chance of stropping fermentation and even that can be unreliable. If you keg rather than bottle, attempting to stop fermentation is less dangerous since a keg won't explode like bottles can. As has been said, the real solution is to brew the beer you want to drink.


8

The bottom line is that while this is by some considered the purest form of brewing, and good beer is attainable without adding finings or priming sugar, is it worth the additional effort and uncertainty? There is certainly truth in not needing to prime some kinds of ales. Cask conditioned ale is often not primed, but simply transferred to the cask before ...


7

Your general understanding is pretty much spot-on. I think the thing to consider here is that your reasoning assumes that half or a third of the priming sugar is meant to yield the same amount of carbonation as it would in the bottle. I'd argue this isn't the case. Notice how recommendations like this keg-underpriming 'common wisdom' usually don't go so far ...


6

No need to worry! The priming sugar will up the alcohol content by a marginal amount but you probably won't notice. It is definitely a good idea to let the yeast take care of the extra priming sugar, although this shouldn't take too long, I'd say wait a couple days and then re-prime and bottle. Priming sugar is a pretty simple sugar so it should ferment ...


6

You should actually brew beers you want to drink. If you brew kits, look for one that has the amount of alcohol you want. If you are all grain, you can tweak any number of things to achieve the desired ABV - from type of yeast to mash temp etc. So yeah you can stop fermentation in your beer but its not a good idea. Unless you have a keg you will have ...


6

Based on my experience and priming experiments I've done, honey adds no flavor when used as priming. You only a tiny bit and it ferments out leaving no flavor behind. In addition, since the fermentability is variable, you don't really know what your carbonation level will be.


6

I agree with JesseB1234 and Mr_road. I did it myself a few times and results may vary. I had one cork poping up out of 5 bottles. It is not ideal, but if you have no other option, here are a few tips : Use short corks, they may be more permeable Do not overfill, leave a bit of space (not too much either) Do not bottle condition too hot, slower bottle ...


5

I don't really agree with your pro and con list. Assuming you're able to calculate the right amount of sweet apple cider to add for priming, and this should be fairly simple arithmetic based on brix and volume, there's no real difference compared to adding table sugar or dextrose. I'd suggest you keep things simple and use sugar for priming. If you're ...


5

Based upon what you said, namely that you only have the one container and it is currently filled with your cider, here are what I see for the pros/cons: Adding it directly to the bucket will give you a consistent carbonation because, as has been mentioned, you can make sure it is uniformly mixed. The downside to this is that you'll stir up the junk that is ...


5

Most of the equipment is not really necessary. It may just make it much easier. When you use a bottling bucket, you rack from fermenter to bottling bucket, leaving a layer of dead yeast cells and sediment behind, which makes for clearer beer. This is especially important when dry hopping or adding fruit. With a bottling bucket you won't disturb all that ...


5

The easiest way to not break the Reinheitsgebot rules is to use malt extract. Either liquid or dried. Simple as that. Many people do this and most homebrew books have a way to calculate the amounts. Malt extract is derived solely from malt sugars. Therefore, in essence it is barley and water and then dehydrated. So all you are left with is unfermented wort (...


5

You do have the answer in your question. When brewing my first kit, I put the sugar in each bottle and here is my experience: Have to measure sugar for each bottle, difficult and time consuming when using different sizes. I did experience gushing when filling bottles that had sugar in them I did get a few bottles that where not as good (due to sugar not ...


5

Sound like its just not done yet. Wild yeast will work slower than some purer strains will work. If there is pressure under the cap when you open it then there is some activity going. Of course, if there wasn't enough sugar then maybe you've just got enough CO2 in the headspace. I think more time will be needed. The notion that the liquid only absorbs ...


4

Rule of thumb to go by - 1oz sugar per 1gal Beer. That will get you a nice carbonation on most beers. I typically just add 5oz every batch and don't mess with any calculations unless I'm intentionally under-carbonating a stout or something.


4

Priming sugar amount depends on carbonation level, that is Total carbonation = CO2 already in beer + CO2 from priming sugar CO2 already in beer depends on the temperature you bottle at CO2 from priming sugar is proportional to amount of sugar used Total carbonation is expressed in volumes (Vol) and depends on beer style. You can find all this taken care ...


4

I have done this many times with a counter-pressure filler. I have also used the Blichmann Beer Gun with success, although I think it does lose a bit more carbonation than the CP-filler. OTOH, the Beer Gun is much easier to use. The key to success is to make sure everything is very cold: Put the bottles in a freezer and take them out 6 at a time as you are ...


4

Almost anything, really, would work... If you want gas in your beer, kind of sugar does not matter, anything that ferment will work. .. but every thing will work in it's own way Glucose Will ferment clean, probably with hardly any side effects. Good choice, easy to obtain and pretty cheap. Dry wort extract Take about 20% more than sugar. It will be ...


4

Usually its fine. There's plenty of yeast around for carbonate, but it will take longer. You should still be bottle conditioning at 60-70F to get the carbonation to happen. If you lager a beer for a real long time, say months, a dose of yeast may help. One way to do this is to just rack some of the settled yeast along for the ride as you transfer the ...


4

If you have a bucket w/ a tap in it, it sounds to me like you already have a bottling bucket. I'd probably buy another bucket w/o a tap to ferment in and bottle using your current bucket. You can ferment in your current bucket but the sediment can actually build up enough that it will block the spigot. Even if not, you will find the outflow will stir up ...


4

You should have no problem using table sugar for priming, but you can use golden syrup if you prefer. I would say there is no risk of ruining the flavour. The amount you are using for priming will not affect the taste, yeast will convert all table sugar into CO2 and alcohol, so there will be no detecable flavour affect on your finished brew.


4

Optimal about 18C-20C. But almost any temperature between 5 and 25 will work. If cooler then it takes longer. It is possible to go higher but there may be some more fruity esters produced although not very much... Best keep it at lower temperature range of 15-20C for about two weeks or so.


4

You could end up with bottle bombs, and even if you are lucky, when opening bottle with much more pressure, you risk gushing. I would empty all bottles in a fermenter, leave it to ferment dry and bottle again with the right quantity of priming sugar. I prefer to prime the whole batch in a bottling bucket, then mix it well. When you prime the whole batch, ...


3

I haven't used priming sugar for a few years now (having also read this book), but I always cask my beers rather than bottle. I transfer from the primary fermenter after one week, and I always end up with sufficient carbonation. This is probably because the yeast that is still in suspension and clearing down within the cask, is enough to produce the ...


3

Why use honey when table sugar is actually a better substitute and more readily available? Yes you can use honey, but measuring it out and adding it to each bottle or en masse to the bottling bucket will be tricky, especially ensuring the honey is evenly mixed in the bottling bucket. Some people recommend using DME to prime, and while this may be the ideal ...


3

The yeast that carbonates your beer should already be in suspension, that is, invisible without a microscope. So, unless you've filtered the beer, don't worry about the yeast. Don't stir up the yeast cake either, those might not be very happy/tasty. But, you should stir the sugar into the beer to get good carbonation, as discussed here and in many other ...


3

The presence of yeasty dust in the bottle and some carbonation leads me to believe you can expect these to carbonate normally. I have lagered beer at controlled temps for at least 5 months and gotten successful bottle conditioning. Issues holding yours back are likely the temp swings. Move the bottles to someplace closer to 70F and try and hold them there....


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