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20

I'm an inexperienced ciderist and I've been researching this very question for around two months. Many renowned cideries use champagne yeast. The thing to remember here is that champagne yeast is very aggressive and should ferment your must to total dryness (little/no sugar remaining, specific gravity below 1.000) so you may need to back-sweeten to achieve ...


11

Start with a sterile carboy, airlock, funnel, and cold pressed apple cider. Don't use anything that has preservatives in it. Pitch in a Campden tablet per gallon of juice to kill any unidentified bacteria or yeast. Let sit for 24 hours then pitch in some champagne or cider yeast. Watch it ferment. Save some 2 litre bottles in the meantime. When the brew is ...


10

B-Brite is an active-oxygen-based cleaner, and these do a good job of making the item sanitary. While they are not classified as sanitizers, that is mainly because of the formal requirements and certification procedures, but in practice they can do a good job of sanitizing. I know people that use only ChemPro, Oxiclean and other active oxygen based cleaners ...


9

Yes, sugar is sugar and yeast convert sugar to alcohol just the same in beer as in cider. (OG - FG) * .131 (or .135 or whatever).


8

The residual sugar in the cider will ferment, as will the sugar added to sweeten the cider. It doesn't matter that the apple juice is pasteurized, as long as there are still yeast in the cider you're adding it to. To have a sweet cider you need to remove or kill the yeast before you sweeten. You can use filtration or chemicals (potassium sorbate and ...


8

My grandfather, who was also a bootlegger during prohibition, used to make huge batches of apple jack in wooden barrels. He said they'd smash up ripe apples, fill the barrels to the top, packed with the crushed apples, and then add well water until it just showed. Then they'd pour in "A shit-load of sugar" my grandfathers words, and lay the barrel top ...


7

Do nothing. That lacing is the residue of the foamy, yeasty head (krausen) clinging to the sides of the jug. There's no need to reincorporate it. Just let the cider finish fermenting.


7

This will not work with a tea-bag or any other kind of cloth. Unless it's enclosed in a very fine membrane the yeast would easily be able to get through, then disperse and propogate in the main liquid. However, something like this can actually be done. Some homebrewers have taken a high-technology cue from industrial beer and do what's known as an ...


7

Unless you were planning on heating the juice itself to a high enough temperature to kill anything in it, it's not really going to matter. Any bacteria or wild yeasts present on the inside of the carboy will also be in the juice itself already. If the juice is labeled as having been pasteurized, then it and its container are probably reasonably sanitary ...


7

Yes you will oxidize the cider (or beer or wine) if you don't use CO2 or some other inert gas like Nitrogen (but that has it's own problems). Oxygen will not "reignite" the yeast. Yeast will happily ferment with CO2 or Helium or Nitrogen or whatever gas you use. Make sure your cider is done fermenting, then put it in the keg. Purge the headspace with CO2. ...


6

I've used champagne yeast, but I find it dries the cider out too much. To reach an acceptable level of residual sweetness you have to back sweeten. That means either disabling the yeast (potassium sorbate, pasteurization, or cold crashing) and then carbonating and sweetening. Or you could add sweetener to each glass you pour. Either way, it's a PITA. I've ...


6

I have been fermenting apple cider for 4 years, so my experience is limited. Last couple of batches have turned out much to my liking. I am using Danstar Windsor My recipe is simple: blend of several apple varieties from my little orchard, then pitch in yeast. That's it, no sugar - either pre or post fermentation; no added flavoring. Windsor is an ...


6

2 cups of sugar weighs around 440g, so let's call that 1 pound. Sugar provides 46 points of gravity, per pound, per gallon. 1 pound of sugar in 2 litres (~ 0.5 gallon) would contribute 92 points of gravity. Apple juice is typically around 1.060. Adding the 92 points from the sugar addition yields an estimated starting gravity of 1.152. To get the 1.21 ...


6

Out of my 12-13 brews I have almost always had condensation on the inside of the lid of the fermentation bucket. I have had a thermometer inside the liquid during fermentation, and one on the outside and it does differ quite a bit. Basically the fermentation causes heat => condensation. Totally normal!


6

The problem is that the cider is still under active fermentation - even if it does not look it. The yeast is consuming sugar, producing CO2, alcohol and flavours. The CO2 gas is over-pressurising the bottles. Bottling incomplete fermentation into glass can be dangerous! The simple advice is to just wait, then bottle only when fermentation is complete. ...


5

I make semi sweet sparkling cider often. After trying a few different types, I find that Danstar Nottingham is the very best. I make mine with table sugar and treetop pasteurized apple juice from Costco. Ferment it out to ~1.010 in primary, bottle (prime with table sugar as you would a pale ale) and then cold crash or pasteurize within about 10 days (when it ...


5

If the cider is really turning into vinegar, than you've got a bacterial infection, probably acetobacter. This bacteria will metabolize alcohol into acetic acid. Acetobacter is present in small quantities in apple juice. It's also carried by fruit flies. There are three things you can do to fix this. Observe proper sanitation technique. Anything the ...


5

The combination of hydrometer and refractometer readings can be used to estimate the ABV % of a finished fermentation. See the section titled Measurement of ABV in this BYO article.


5

I don't really agree with your pro and con list. Assuming you're able to calculate the right amount of sweet apple cider to add for priming, and this should be fairly simple arithmetic based on brix and volume, there's no real difference compared to adding table sugar or dextrose. I'd suggest you keep things simple and use sugar for priming. If you're ...


5

If you carbonate it, that carbonation should give it a perceived fuller body. Aside from that, you could try adding some grape tannin or some acid blend, as those should help it feel fuller and more complex. Here's a pretty decent primer from the Norther Brewer on basic cider making that covers these points in brief: https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/2785/...


5

'[C]an I add fresh squeezed apple juice the carboy to take up the space?' Sure, but introducing fermentable sugars (from the fresh juice) would re-start fermentation and defeat your stated goal of clarification. '[W]ater can be used, but it will dilute the cider.' Correct, and unless this is what you want, there's no reason to add water, especially ...


5

That's an insane amount of yeast for a one gallon batch. Your yeast ate through all the sugar quickly, and now it probably doesn't have anything left to eat. Do you have a hydrometer? If you don't, get one. That way you'll be able to measure the amount of sugar before & after fermentation instead of just guessing. Don't start over, and don't buy a new ...


5

Based upon what you said, namely that you only have the one container and it is currently filled with your cider, here are what I see for the pros/cons: Adding it directly to the bucket will give you a consistent carbonation because, as has been mentioned, you can make sure it is uniformly mixed. The downside to this is that you'll stir up the junk that is ...


5

Having done a fair amount of both, I've outlined some differences below. First, a note on terminology: since there is no steeping of ingredients in cider making, you don't actually "brew" cider. I don't know if there is a cider specific term; I simply say, "I made a batch of cider" (versus I brewed a batch of beer). General differences: Making cider is ...


5

Carbonation drops are just aliquoted doses of sugar. They still carbonate by the action of yeast in the bottle. I don't think carb drops will solve the problem you describe.


5

Looks like a very clean pellicle, biofilm from a bacteria. Taste the cider, you may have something nice there. But it's probably not what you were expecting from yeast.


5

Ginger has its own microbes that will change fermentation. You will want to kill if you just want ginger flavor and aroma. I would suggest making a ginger slurry then pastureize it by bringing it to about 200°F (90°C) for about 3 minutes. Cool it in a sanitary way (cover / seal). Then add this slurry late fermentation when most of your alcohol is present.


5

I don't age my ciders intentionally. I control the fermentation so they are clean. While I have aged cider up to two years in bottles (Got lost in cooler) I prefer it fresh. My friends that do spontaneous fermentation say they take up to 18 months to melow into something nice. It really depends on how you ferment. Note: If you add sugar to boost ABV it's ...


5

I think you need to wait for fermentation to stop before you bottle it, as co2 is being produced in the bottle and builds up the gas inside. Once fermentation has stopped you can filter it and you will have a still cider. If you want fizzy cider you can add a very small amount of yeast to the bottle but I guess you may need to experiment with that.


5

You can add pectinase (also called pectic enzyme) to your crushed fruit / to your must to increase juice yield. You can find it at your local wine making / home brewing store or online, e.g., on amazon. Pectinase is an enzyme that breaks down the pectin in the walls in fruit. It's frequently used in (fruit) wine making. Think of it as the opposite of adding ...


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