7

I can't imagine anyone suggesting bottling at a FG of 1.042 I would return them to the fermenter and allow fermintation to complete. Those are bottle bombs. Be careful. Many yeasts don't survive at 6.5% ABV, but there are plenty that do. Wine yeasts for example. At 1.042 we would call that a stalled or stuck fermentation, and a more tolerant yeast can be ...


6

Your general understanding is pretty much spot-on. I think the thing to consider here is that your reasoning assumes that half or a third of the priming sugar is meant to yield the same amount of carbonation as it would in the bottle. I'd argue this isn't the case. Notice how recommendations like this keg-underpriming 'common wisdom' usually don't go so far ...


5

Looks like a vigorous fermentation to me. Consider switching to a blowoff tube for the primary. Its nothing bad, and I wouldn't worry about infection at this point, it will settle down in a few days to a week.


5

The release of gas when you moved it is not uncommon. There is usually residual CO2 from the fermentation dissolved in the liquid and by agitating the liquid when you moved it, some of that gas is escaping. Much like swirling a glass of beer to get more foam or aroma out of it. (For the record, up swings in temperature can also generate the appearance of ...


4

Cool them down to as close to freezing as you can to make sure as much as possible of the CO2 stays in solution. Then carefully vent the pressure from each one in a safe place. If it's not done carbonating then I'd repeat the above every day until it is. (Edit: it's done after 6 months...)


4

If the beer is overcarbonated, I'd just degas it. Lift the cap of each bottle, let the CO2 escape until the foam reaches the cap, let go; repeat as many times as necessary, waiting for the foam to fall back between each degassing. It can take a couple dozen sessions over several days to reach the desirable/safe carbonation level. If the beer is not cooled ...


3

Measure gravity. That's the only way to be sure. You can have little to no bubbles and fermentation going on if the lid didn't seal completely. Or you can have bubbles and no fermentation if you release residual CO2. Or you can have stuck fermentation you will unstuck by agitating and adding priming sugar. So don't guess it. Measure it. Three days without ...


3

If only some of the bottles were overcarbonated, in my experience that means the priming sugar wasn't mixed into the beer thoroughly enough in the bottling bucket. Two ways to ameliorate that are: if you have enough length, coil the tubing coming from your racking cane on the bottom of the bucket, creating a gentle whirlpool sanitize a spoon and gently mix ...


3

No, neither of those would have contributed. The 3 primary causes of overcarbed bottles are.. 1) incomplete fermentation...bottling too soon, before fermentation is finished 2) too much priming sugar 3) infection Do any of those possibly describe your situation?


3

Brett won't change the amount of priming sugar you need. Just be sure fermentation is complete before bottling. The problems people have had with Brett is if it is added later after another yeast, it can consume sugars the other yeast won't consume, leading to overcarbonation. Also, it usually ferments slower than saccaromyces, so you may want to wait ...


3

I like my ginger beer somewhat sweet and carbonated. This means that, at some point after bottling, the fermentation/carbonation process must be stopped. To determine this point, I bottle as normal (in glass bottles), but I also bottle one 500ml plastic soda bottle (an empty PET bottle, like coke, mineral water, etc.). I test this bottle daily to check the ...


2

Did you put the beer in the fridge overnight before opening it? The problem you describe sounds a lot like bottled-carbonated beer that never had a chance to get the CO2 dissolved into the beer: lots of foaming when you pop the cap, then flat beer in the glass. Gases dissolve more readily into cold liquid than warm liquid. When your residual yeast ...


2

Check that your glass is totally clean and free from oils and detergent. I doubt the beer lost it's head because of overcarbonation (and I don't think you've overcarbonated.) Even if you did, wheat beers tend to be served with medium-high to high levels of carbonation. The head stability is produced from proteins and hop acids. Looking at the recipe in the ...


2

Carbonation can have a dramatic effect on beer flavor. I suspect your beer is overcarbonated and that's the cause of the off flavor. You can reduce the carbonation by allowing the keg to warm up to room temperature and periodically venting the keg as the CO2 comes out of solution. As suggested by @Pepi, use this chart to determine what you should set your ...


2

Could be any number of things. Style of beer, some styles require more/less carbonation and pressure. Could be a kink or something in the line that causes the beer to bubble/foam in the line on the way out. Maybe try hooking the keg up to one of your other faucets?


2

The combination of bad flavour and foaming bottles could indicate an infection by wild yeast or bacteria. From How to Brew by John Palmer. Gusher Infection However, the sustained bubbling is often due to "gusher type" infection. These infections can occur at any time and are due to wild yeasts or bacteria that eat the higher order sugars, like dextrins. ...


2

If you took a specific gravity reading before you bottled and were confident that it was at final gravity, de-gas a sample and take another gravity reading now. If it's the same, it's over-carbonated. If it's noticeably lower, then some other wild yeast or bacteria else has likely got a hold of it.


2

The original post reads as though you used almost 1kg of different sugars for priming the beer for carbonation. But from your comment I see that is not the case. Without knowing the size in g of the carbonation drops I can't say if 2 is to much, but for the rest of the answer I'm going to assume it is not. As you have taken 3 gravity readings and they ...


2

What size batch was this? 600g of DME might be reasonable for a 15 gallon (~57L) batch but if you also added in 400g of other sugars, it's not surprising that you had an over-carbonation issue. It's almost surprising it took 4 weeks to have issues. If the batch was smaller (especially if it was 5 gallons/19L) even just the DME would be to much. We're you ...


2

I second the point from Septimus G about waiting longer. After adding fruit or puree I would almost always wait 2-3 weeks, sometimes even a month. You didn't state how long you had left the primary fermentation? For a high gravity stout or barley wine I would usually give 3-4 weeks in the primary. And 1-2 weeks in the secondary; before bottling. Then if ...


2

Yes, you may open the bottles release pressure, and cap them again. You won't be introducing (any significant amount of) oxygen by doing this, but do it in a clean environment. As to why this happened, it seems that the sugars present in the fruit were not fully fermented by the time you bottled. Next time you can either wait longer, or make sure the S.G. ...


2

The speed at which your brew carbonates is dependant on a number of factors: temprerature, yeast cell count, residual CO2, residual sugar. Sometimes your beer can carb up this quickly especially if it is warm in your house. The fact it has carbed up so quickly suggests that either you have: carried a lot of yeast over into your bottles, which will chew ...


2

My bet is that your beer was underattenuated in the first place. Since you're brewing with extract-only, I guess you're a beginner and might have neglected on making a healthy yeast pitch (no offence meant, we've all been there). "No action in the bubbler" is not a sign of completed fermentation - always measure the gravity and ensure you've reached the ...


2

If you prime (add sugar) per bottle I would advise you change and batch prime as its easier and more consistent, method detailed below. All I do to ensure a consistent carbonation level is use the calculator found here to determine how much sugar to add (corn sugar is dirt cheap) and then do as follows: Weigh out the required amount of sugar into a pan Add ...


2

I ended up transporting the bottles in a following set up: put bottles to a plastic bucket and filled the space beetween them with insides of an old pillow. I packed the buckets to car in a way they could not move. It worked quite well, none of the bottles exploded but I also drived quite carefully.


2

I'd say you have lager yeast hanging out in your system. Roasted grains will have more maltotriose, a sugar ale yeast can't consume, but lager can. This would explain why they're fine until later on, lack of off flavors and cold storage doesn't hold off the process. The acid bite, is probably the natural acid in dark grains without the maltotriose to ...


2

It sounds to me your ginger beer is still fermenting inside the bottle. When this happens, it creates more co2 and creates more pressure inside your bottle. Perhaps when you add your ginger bug into the bottle, yeast is activated and starts/continue to carbonate more, hence the pressure build up. Does releasing the built up pressure in a bottle harm the ...


2

Too many variables to predict the rate. That's why you can't find a chart. Temperature, ABV of beer, yeast cell count per bottle, yeast viability, residual extract in beer (related to FG), dissolved O2: All these things contribute to your specific question about rate. It is not going to be universal. You need to sacrifice a few bottles along the way and ...


1

Usually such odd gushers are associated with infection by e.g. wild yeast which have higher attenuation. You may want to do a side-by-side taste of normal vs gusher bottle.


1

No matter how much sugar is added to the recipe (which will increase OG and possibly FG), the main problem is over carbonation in the bottles. Two carbonation drops per bottle is ok for 750ml bottles. Cooper's mention: "The dosage required is 1 drop per 345-375ml bottle or 2 drops per 740-750ml bottle". So it is possible that fermentation was not ...


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