8

Looks just like yeast to me. If foam rushed into your airlock, this is really probable. Sugars are dissolved and you won't see them as a layer. I would replace the airlock with clean one - that way, you wouldn't have to worry what it actually is.


7

Grats on your first brew! Ultimately you need to draw beer from above the trub (sediment). If your fermentor is designed for fermenting and has a spigot, it should have an adjustable arm you can turn to draw beer from above the trub. If it's a bottling bucket you can prop up the bucket a couple inches while it's settling to get trub to settle away from ...


7

This is not really a mistake but just a byproduct of the process of bottle conditioning which most homebrewers go through. The sediment is dead yeast cells and proteins that are in suspension in beer but drop out over time. You can reduce the amount of sediment by racking but unless you filter it out somehow you'll never get rid of it all. The sediment ...


7

It's likely since you are bottling directly from your fermentation vessel through a spigot that the spigot is low enough on the vessel that it is able to pull in a bit of the yeast cake as you fill your bottles. Each batches' yeast cake at the bottom of the vessel will vary in size depending on such things as: Original gravity Proteins and cold break in ...


7

You'll never remove the sediment at the bottom when bottle conditioning. 5-6mm is not a terribly large amount of sediment either. Here are a few methods that can reduce the sediment: Use a secondary fermentor, typically a 5-gallon carboy. This is used after primary fermentation, and has little to do with fermentation despite the name. It removes the beer ...


5

First, there is almost never a need to use a secondary fermenter unless you add something to the beer that produces a true secondary fermentation. The idea of using a secondary on a regular basis comes from the commercial brewing industry. The fermenters homebrewers use are far smaller and the risk of autolysis is virtually nonexistent, unlike commercial ...


5

Depends on how well settled the sediment is to begin with. The key is to keep the bottles upright so that the surface of the liquid remains in the confined space in the neck. Assuming normal flat roadways, you should be fine. How long it will take for the bottles to settle back down if they do get stirred up is subject to how stirred up they get and how ...


5

Here is a neat article about the Beer clarification process: Clarification of Beer: Advanced Brewing . The article is about beer, but they derive a rough formula estimating it will take about 88 hours for yeast to settle 1 meter in beer. If the the yeast is only disturbed to a height of .1 meters is should take around 8 to 9 hours to settle. Cider is less ...


5

"Rafts" or anything floating at this stage sounds infected. If you had good fermentation it's unlikely it will be harmful to sample. Open one, see if you can recover the floaty. If its white / creamy color. I would sample taste the beer. If it's blue / black. Dump em.


4

Sounds like a vigorous, but otherwise normal fermentation. Rack to secondary, if that's your process, or leave it in the carboy for another week or two before bottling. The krausen residue on the walls of the carboy won't affect the final beer. In the future you might consider using a blow-off tube instead of an airlock.


4

No, the alcohol is dispersed throughout the beer. Indeed, the entire thing is homogenous.


3

Options 1) You moved your fermenter so that you can siphon the beer off. This lead to the yeast bed being disturbed. There was some CO2 caught in the yeast bed and because of the broken bed the CO2 and the accompanying yeast rose to the top. 2) Same as above, but your raking cane caused the break. 3) Your beer was warming up during the siphoning process and ...


3

Yes. Force carbonation. Also various clarification procedures (Irish Moss, filtration) to get rid of any remaining protein in the finished beer.


3

First off, I would expect to have sediment in the bottles if you bottle directly from the FV. Actually I am surprised that you havent had this before, probably the muslin bag was catching most of it. In addition, when I am bottling, I like to move my FV to it's racking location a day or 2 in advance of bottling so it has time to settle again after all the ...


3

In the 80s UK, Boots, the chemists, who already sold home brew kits, developed a yeast that settled at the bottom of bottles as a gel. Unlike the sediment you're used to, that is disturbed when you tip the bottle, this just sat there. Friends, who used to avoid my home brew, said things like, Wow this tastes like real beer. it was clear and sparkling. For ...


3

Ditto, most likely yeast. Try and use a "blow off tube" next time as the krausen is forming, usually during the first few days after the start of fermentation.... depending on fermentation temp, type of yeast, etc. When krausen falls or as it is falling replace blow off tube with a sanitized airlock. This link has some images of blow off tubes. Brewing ...


3

Floating things in the bottle after that period of time doesn't sound good... Did you add some sort of solids like dry hops or spices to the fermentation? Could be yeast of course, but this usually settles at the bottom. Or did you shake it? One way to be sure: try it. It should be carbonated and if it doesn't smell bad it is probably good to go. To ...


2

When you serve from the keg, the first couple of pints will be cloudy, even if the rest of the beer is clear, so you need to pull a couple of pints before you can judge cloudiness. There are a couple of ways to speed up sedimentation cold crash - chill the beer to 33F for a week or longer use gelatin finings - again, chill the beer to 33F or as cold as you ...


2

I have not experienced this before, but I would try to err on the safe side and siphon off everything above it, and try to leave the bubble undisturbed. If it is gas, it will probably pop since the pressure around it decreases, but if it is liquid you might be able to leave it in peace. I guess that it is liquid though which could have formed because the ...


2

It looks like yeast cake because that is what it is. The yeast clumps together, and settles to the bottom as gets near the terminal gravity. That is called "flocculation", and some strains are much more prone to it than others. If you go to the manufacturers web site, they usually give a rating: low, medium or high. With the high ones, sometimes it is ...


2

If the brew went well then there is probably a lot of yeast left in solution and it will precipitate in the bottle. If the brew was not so complete then keep a watch on your bottles for excessive pressure! If all else fails then remember that "bottle conditioning" over many months can cure a multitude of sins.... as well as rendering an undrinkable brew "fit ...


2

I'd say it's a "micro-krausen". At bottling, the space above beer in a bottle is just air. You added sugar for consumption by yeast, so resulting CO2 would carbonate beer. It's reasonable to expect yeast to do whatever it normally does in the fermenter, just at much smaller scale. So it produces that. My experience is that the more O2 is available, the more ...


2

No need to worry. Since you already racked your wine once (from primary to secondary) you already gotten rid of most of gross lees. Fine lees are less problematic, and can remain for a few weeks without problems. You may rack your wine again to clarify it further. People usually have a racking schedule, and rack as many times as they want (depends on ...


2

Yes there is. Pectine is cleared by hydrolysis, pectine molecules are broken down and will sediment as pectine flakes. Those sediments are often called fine lees, and will float above the heavier gross lees. There are good (french) articles on wikipedia, confirming this: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%C3%A9bourbage https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


1

The existing answers are hard to add to. However, making sure you end up with minimal sediment in your fermenter in the first place goes a long way in clarifying the beer. Such as using hop bags or a boil screen to keep pellet hop gunk out. Also the use of clarifying agents such as whirfloc in the boil and using a whirpool will all contribute to the wort ...


1

I've had big problems with too much trub (sediment) in my first couple of batches but now that I use an auto-syphon it isn't really an issue anymore. Hop pellets definitely will contribute to the sediment residing at the bottom of a batch but an auto-siphon is extremely helpful as you can use it to avoid sucking directly off of the bottom of the carbon, thus ...


1

You can also add gelatin to the batch before bottling. Our will cause they sediment to coagulate and settle. Then bottle using cane and a racking tip to ensure less debris. I had the same issue as well.


1

If you have no sediment then likely your yeast is dead and you should probably get some new yeast and add it in.


1

Have you already mixed in the sugar? If so, you'll want to bottle it now before fermentation begins. I've also observed clumps of yeast rising from the bottom of the fermenter when racking, but I have no explanation of why this happens. I think you're fine to bottle it as is. The beer will clarify in the bottle, if left long enough, and the yeast will form ...


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