6

I agree with JesseB1234 and Mr_road. I did it myself a few times and results may vary. I had one cork poping up out of 5 bottles. It is not ideal, but if you have no other option, here are a few tips : Use short corks, they may be more permeable Do not overfill, leave a bit of space (not too much either) Do not bottle condition too hot, slower bottle ...


6

According to this calculator, adding 1.4oz of sugar to 2gal at 35°F is equivalent to adding 5.4oz at 68°F. At 35°F the disolved CO2 is around 1.61vol whereas at 68°F it is 0.86vol. In your case the CO2 level should be around 2.9vol after carbonation at 68°F, it is very fizzy for a regular Ale (see carbonation guidelines ), but it should be fine and not ...


5

Yes, there is a potential risk of bottle bombs, as with any incomplete ferment. The residual fermentables can be fermented by the remaining yeast in the bottle along with the priming sugar and produce more CO2 than intended. Ideally you should cold crash only after you are sure primary is complete. Many brewers simply leave the beer in primary for at least 2 ...


4

tl;dr - Yes. It is definitely possible for wine bottles to break or explode, but I've seen many more stories of homebrewers having the corks pop out. I have, however, personally witnessed a commercial "organic," "no sulfites added" wine blow out the bottom of its bottle sitting on the shelf in a grocery store. Most likely, this depends on how secure the ...


3

There is no hard and fast rule on when bottles will go bang. You can calculate the amount of CO2 produced in bottle fermentation from the gravity drop just like you can calculate the amount of alcohol produced, but when it goes bang depends on several other factors, of which the pressure rating of the bottle and the amount of head space are the two main ones....


3

I have done so before and it was OK, but... you do run the risk of them blowing up. If you do close them off I would cork them and leave them pointing up, so hopefully the corks would pop before the bottle, and as pointing up would not flood your storage area. Best to use champagne bottles.


3

The bottles will probably be fine, although they are not made for being under pressure so don’t take my word for it. But how do you want to close them off? Corks without some sort of cage will pop out over time due to the pressure inside and the necks of wine bottles are not made for crown caps.


3

Looks Fine.. almost. You do need some yeast nutrients though. And.... 2 cups sugar to 1 gal puts you in Apple wine territory, and will be hard for a bakers yeast to attenuate fully. Also adding a priming sugar will do little with this recipe as the yeast will have died from its ABV tollerance. When I make cider it's like this. 1) Sanitize everthing: ...


3

No matter how careful you are, you can pick up a wild yeast infection and wind up w/ gushers and bottle bombs. They do explode w/ some force--enough to cause minor injuries for sure--but a regular plastic storage container would contain it. I think the worst you would see is the glass exploding w/ enough force to damage the container but it would still ...


2

A 25% increase in priming sugar really shouldn't do this. 5oz corn sugar in 4 gallons will put 3.2 volumes of c02. 4oz = 2.8 volumes. 3.2 volumes is within tolerance of a normal bottle. But most commercial beers will use a thicker champagne style bottle when more than 3 volumes are expected. Its possible there was been more fermentables available to the ...


2

Avoid it as previous answers have stated. Outside of that, if you are worried about it I would just condition in rubbermaid containers, mainly to contain the mess. That said, I've never had a bomb, so i don't worry about it. I have had gushers though; mainly because I had a few too many homebrews while bottling my homebrew, and I doubled the priming ...


2

I thought about using wine bottles, but then I discovered that you can put a cap onto champagne bottles using a 29mm cap. However, you will need a capper that allows you to swap the bell to 29mm.


2

No, standard wine bottles are not meant to hold much pressure at all. Less than one atmosphere and then will easily break. Believe me, I've had wine that was barely fizzy and bottles started to pop. Plus there is no way to hold the pressure back unless you use screw caps. Better to find 22oz beer bottles or sparkling wine bottles. Hang out at your local ...


1

You should always be worried about bottle bombs (or at the very least, over-carbed beer) if you cant assert that fermentation is complete before you bottle. Buy a hydrometer and use it to assert that fermentation is complete (specific gravity reading stable for 3 days) before bottling. It removes guesswork from the process and thus anxiety from wondering ...


1

Eh up Ben, I've been brewing for 25 yrs and i still worry about bottle bombs. but lets put this in perspective, if fermentation is complete- IE no change in sg for a couple of days and you don't over prime all should be well. All my bottles are stored in a cardboard box with packing, losing the beer is not the issue with me its not having to clean up a big ...


1

In my experience, 0.010 SG above terminal gravity is asking for bottle bombs.


1

The best way to avoid a "bottle bomb" is to ferment the brew to completion and then add a known amount of priming sugar before bottling. In such a way the amount of carbonation can be relatively well controlled and the "bomb" situation should never occur. Some do not like using priming sugar and aim to bottle the beer before fermentation of the malt is ...


1

You do need to be more careful about the sugar to beer ratio. I would think that could be a big part of the issue. However, if some of your oktoberfest beers are starting to go too then I suspect your fermentation was not as complete as you think. And even more realistic is that you have gotten a microbial contamination that has started to ferment out ...


1

If you lower the temperature you will increase the amount of CO2 that can dissolve into solution, thereby slightly reducing the pressure. I would carefully open and drink them, over the next week or so. Also you could open and recap? If you do put them into the refrigerator and another explodes, then dispose of all of them.


1

In the past I've only gotten bombs when I had put too much sugar into the bottle when conditioning, and it has always happened within a week or 2. I think also with wine bottles being a thick as they are they are a bit tougher. If you haven't added extra sugar for bottle carbonation then there must've been some residual left in there when you bottled the ...


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