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6 votes

Is there anything as too much priming sugar?

If you have added approximately the right amount of priming sugar and your beer is not carbonated at all, your problem probably is not the amount of sugar added. A common problem is inadequate mixing ...
Rob's user avatar
  • 411
6 votes
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How to over carbonate?

Bottle bombs are usually beers that are about 10 gravity points above terminal gravity for standard 12oz bottles, then hit TG in the bottles. So 1.020 SG when 1.010 is TG. For typical normal ...
Evil Zymurgist's user avatar
6 votes
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Same priming sugar when using larger bottles?

I use the same amount of priming sugar, in the batch, and I use a mix of bottles. 12oz and 32oz. and they carbonate the same. if you are adding sugar to individual bottles, then the amount would be ...
jsolarski's user avatar
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4 votes

What is the ideal temperature during carbonation with priming for an ale?

Optimal about 18C-20C. But almost any temperature between 5 and 25 will work. If cooler then it takes longer. It is possible to go higher but there may be some more fruity esters produced although not ...
barking.pete's user avatar
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3 votes

Carbonation Drops vs. Sugar?

I have been using regular supermarket sugar cubes ( Domino Dots ) in 12 oz bottles. They are 198 to a lb which is 2.3g per cube. Which is 2.5 volumes of CO2. I ferment in my bottling bucket so my ...
FastEddie's user avatar
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3 votes
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What is the ideal temperature during carbonation with priming for an ale?

You are correct when you say the warmer the brews are stored the faster carbonation will complete. Carbonation is a mini fermentation, so ideally you would want it to complete around the same ...
Mr_road's user avatar
  • 7,048
2 votes

Adding priming sugar to lagering secondary

adding your sugar to secondary then cold crashing, the yeast may start eating sugar and fermenting again even at near freezing temps (not likely but possibility), and then you would need to add more ...
jsolarski's user avatar
  • 1,769
2 votes

Urgent help for a new beginner

I think you mean a 5 gallon batch (19 L)? I don't know your specific recipe, but the corn sugar is usually for priming the bottles for carbonation after the beer is done. So you would boil your ...
Dave's user avatar
  • 608
2 votes

closed keg fermentation - is it taking place?

I wouldn't expect to hear anything. It's a closed system, the CO2 is dissolving into the beer, not bubbling to the top - as there is no pressure difference for the bubbles to "gurgle-into" (your ...
Kingsley's user avatar
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2 votes
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closed keg fermentation - is it taking place?

Yes in theory it is. but no real way to tell, until serving time. one way to tell is either hook up a regulator to it and get the pressure, or press the gas in valve without anything hooked up to see ...
jsolarski's user avatar
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2 votes
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Is it wise to dissolve priming sugar or gelatin in water the day before adding it to the beer?

No need to cool it down. I don't. Beer turns out good anyway. Yeast doesn't die because it's such a small volume of hot liquid in a much larger volume of beer.
dmtaylor's user avatar
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2 votes
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Sugar lager/cider brewing

Actually, no difference at all in the kinds of sugar. The difference could be made that "brewing sugar" is added at the stage of the boil, and "priming sugar" is added at bottling time, for ...
chthon's user avatar
  • 3,665
2 votes

Bad Batch after a brewing break of 20 years

Sorry to hear that, man. That really sucks. Truth is, we all have a bad batch and/or brewday now and then. It's just part of the hobby ;) It's hard to tell from your post what specifically went wrong ...
HomeBrew's user avatar
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1 vote
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Bad Batch after a brewing break of 20 years

Gushers (the kind where you have to mop your beer off the ceiling after opening the bottle) can only have a few possible causes. Bottling too early. You did not check the gravity before bottling in ...
Frank van Wensveen's user avatar
1 vote
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Yield rates for priming sugar calculations

The term is a bit misleading as normally Dry Yield means that a solution is "dried" and subsequently as much sugar is extracted. Honey has about ~95% fermentables but also contains about 15~...
Lucas Kauffman's user avatar
  • 1,127
1 vote

Re-Carbonating bottles in case bottles loose CO2

There should not be a problem using PET bottles for holding gas pressure. These are commonly used for other carbonated beverages. My local store sells new PET bottles for the express purpose of ...
Kingsley's user avatar
  • 2,060
1 vote

Is it wise to dissolve priming sugar or gelatin in water the day before adding it to the beer?

Nothing you propose to do is it bad, i.e you won't harm your beer by adding the hot sugar solution and or adding the Gelatine at the same time. So don't worry about that. However; if your goal was to ...
zatbusch's user avatar
  • 536
1 vote

Priming kit beer without bottling bucket

It's easy to overprime a 5L mini-keg. They only need 1 tablespoon sugar to prime, which is much less than an equivalent 5L in various bottle sizes. This is because the amount of head space in a keg ...
dmtaylor's user avatar
  • 3,415
1 vote

Is there anything as too much priming sugar?

Different beers do need different levels of carbonation. Let me tell you something; a lot of science goes behind the process of carbonation. Before your priming process, you should make sure your ...
Vittal Kamath's user avatar
1 vote

Best Carbonation amount of sugar

How long it will need depends mainly on temperature, and viability of the yeast. Viability of yeast in turn depends on things like strength of beer, length of primary (and secondary if applicable) ...
David Liam Clayton's user avatar
1 vote

closed keg fermentation - is it taking place?

There won't be any gargling. You can always pull the PRV quickly to see if there is any pressure building up... but then you are losing CO2 that isn't going to make it into the beer. Most kegs still ...
brewchez's user avatar
  • 36.2k
1 vote

Urgent help for a new beginner

I'm relatively new to the homebrew game. I have a few batches under my belt. The following is some advice I can give on Extract brewing Before you even get started, make sure that you have your hops ...
Deano252's user avatar
1 vote

Why do we boil sugar before priming

Sugar doesn't kill microbes. Microbes don't grow in it because there's little water around. But if you have an open bag of sugar (or anything for that matter) sitting around in your kitchen that you ...
brewchez's user avatar
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1 vote
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Why do we boil sugar before priming

It's because sugar dissolves much more easily into boiling water, and the syrup that results is easier to incorporate evenly into the beer. There's a sanitizing component as well, but it's minimal.
Herb Tarlek's user avatar
1 vote
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How to calculate and add the required amount of inverted sugar (liquid) during the bottleling phase?

Here are the numbers that I use to calculate the amoutn of priming Sugar that I use (based on actual Sugar, not syrup, but that should be easy to convert): 4 grams of Sugar (Sucrose) per liter will ...
Thijs's user avatar
  • 26
1 vote

Effect of priming with honey

If I want a slight honey flavor, I cold crash a 5 gallon batch after fermentation to separate out the yeast or pasteurize then add a cup of honey mixed with a bit of High proof alcohol to dilute and ...
M Nunya Biz's user avatar
1 vote

What causes "rush" carbonation when adding sugar?

Suggestion: Instead of repriming with sugar or carbonation drops, try using corn syrup instead. (Make your own, don't buy commercial corn syrup.) Adding the syrup eliminates much of the nucleation ...
W R Knight's user avatar

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