3

You are right. Cold temperatures only slow down the yeast, not completely kill them. As long as the beer is kept at the correct temperature for the rest of the time, it should turn out fine.


2

Too many variables to predict the rate. That's why you can't find a chart. Temperature, ABV of beer, yeast cell count per bottle, yeast viability, residual extract in beer (related to FG), dissolved O2: All these things contribute to your specific question about rate. It is not going to be universal. You need to sacrifice a few bottles along the way and ...


2

It's actually going to be pretty difficult to cause excess oxidation if you aren't doing it intentionally or performing extra transfers. If you've had uneven priming then you are going to need to up your mixing game. Jeff's method is going to be foolproof for all methods that aren't just adding syrup to your mix. Maybe some context will help ease your mind/...


1

Cold temperatures don't hurt or kill the yeast, but only slow them down. In fact at the end of fermentation of my last batch, I had my beer down to 29 F in the garage for about a week, and it's still carbonated just fine in the bottles. So it's not a concern at all. Bottle conditioning works best anyplace from about 50-65 F, or so-called "cellar ...


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