7

Citra is a good bet for grapefruit aromas. Check this link for a nice tool to help with hopping your beers https://www.hopunion.com/aroma-wheel/


3

Check your brew notes, as many details as possible are appreciated and limits the speculations in answers. Solutions differ for many causes of the stuck fermentaion. If I had to guess, it may have got too cold, raise temp to 75°F. Or the mash was above 158° and the yeast ignored the more complex sugars.


3

As farmersteve said that bottle isn't going to work for carbonating. You need a bottle that will be air tight, and to add a priming sugar. Cloudy is to be expected from 100% wheat. About the citrus balance, I think the 1.24oz / 36gm of peel was fine. And the amount of grain was good. You just had poor effenciency. Your OG is about half what it should have ...


3

Oxygen at this point may create some oxidation off flavors (wet paper) since you're close to 50% attenuation. Try to warm it up and swirl more. I would go to 74°F. I would question your measuring device. You shouldn't have any significant rises until it has completed. Usually on a graph at the very end of fermentation a slight rise in gravity is the ...


3

Let's start with your hops replacements. Traditionally (before hops became common) all sorts of other herbs were used. These all had something in common: an intense bitter flavor. You need the bitterness to offset the otherwise cloying sweetness of the beer. While green tea, orange peel or coriander may work to flavor a beer (not sure I'd enjoy a coriander-...


3

Yes. It's called dunkelweizen. Made with wheat malt and Munich malt. http://wiki.homebrewersassociation.org/15BDunkelweizen


3

You can certainly try it. That's the major advantage of homebrewing. However, just because these beers are coming prepackaged nowadays doesn't mean that's the way its done in the place of origin. These things evolved really as beer cocktails. I think its far better to just add the lemonade to the beer in the glass. That way you have great beer to begin ...


2

Lactose. It's unfermented by standard brewing yeasts and leaves residual sweetness in the bottle/keg. And it doesn't take much to sweeten a brew. To figure out how much you need, mix lactose 1-to-1 by volume with boiling water and siphon off about 4 oz of your beer, then add the sweetener by the mL until it's the sweetness you want. Multiply to your volume, ...


2

Centennial will give a pronounced grapefruit flavor.


2

So, actually, after one week or so, i have new data. As you can see on the graph below, my fermentation restarted and slowly made its way to ~1.020 (it's still fermenting and i'll leave it for one more week or so). Fermentation was actually stuck and there was still a lot of fermentable sugar, my guess is that my initial problem was not enough oxygenation ...


2

It is most likely not the nutrients that are needed but oxygen, your stir will have introduced sufficent oxygen to drop a further 5 points of gravity. I advise popping the top and giving it a really good stir, and a shake this will do 2 things, firstly in gets some more oxygen into the wort, and also resuspends the yeast.


2

Mostly everything there looks good. Exception is the use of maltodextrin which is non-fermentable. So it will increase the OG and FG but not the ABV resulting in a beer that may be too sweet and unbalanced. Also steeping cara malts will also be mostly unfermentable sugars adding to the high FG. Yes carapils and carafoam are about the same, just different ...


1

I would suggest steeping a pound of Carapils. It will improve the grainy flavors that you just can’t get from extract alone, and since it is already converted (caramel/crystal malt), no mashing is necessary. Alternatively or eventually, you may want to move towards a partial mash brewing process to further enhance malt flavors, including those you can get ...


1

IMO you've got a nice beer here that will be really drinkable for the season when it's ready in a few weeks. Really, there isn't a need for specialty grains unless you want to just add them out of habit. In that case you could use a pound of some light 2 row and a pound of american wheat. But I don't think it's going to really effect your profile/abv/color ...


1

I would get some honey, maybe some fruit, bakers' yeast and make a mead. Factory produced bread yeast generally has an alcohol tolerance of around 14% AbV. https://www.growforagecookferment.com/mead-recipes/ You can probably also buy malt extract (cooking grade) in the baking section.


1

For a 24L batch of extract lager beer I often use this recipe. It can be modified as wished but it gives a guide to what can be done. The hops can be changed for any similar amount of "nobel hops" but this mix gives a light clean hop taste and mild aroma. 40g Hallertauer-Herbrrucker boil for 45 minutes 15g Tettnang boil for 15 minutes 2.5Kg extra pale ...


1

I added 7g of bitter Orange peel and 7g of fresh cracked (not ground) coriander seed directly into a 25 Litre bucket after 4 days of fermenting a wheat beer. I left them in for 10 days. It seemed like everything precipitated with the yeast, although after pouring the beer off and mixing with priming sugar solution, I took the precaution of putting some nylon ...


1

I don't think there was much you could do on the fermentation side to fix anything. I'd still have planned ferment it out, plan to dry hop it heavily to try and create a little more balance. Then I'd learn form the experience and get ready to re-brew the beer I wanted to brew. To limit your efficiency, you could sparge a little faster or ease up on the ...


1

I'm not sure how you like your root beer, but to get a taste similar to commercial root beers, you'll need a completely different recipe. Here is a related question: How would I make Alcoholic Rootbeer?


1

I'd say it's out of line to use artificial sweeteners. Although some people brew to save money, or because beer simply isn't available where they live, most do it to make a quality product free of space-age-technology-ingredients. Most of the sweetening of Splenda is from sucralose. Despite the company's claims that the chlorine in sucralose is natural they ...


1

The style guidelines for wheat beers mention ester notes as being common in German, and moderate in American wheat beers. I expect you might be ok. On the other hand, you might go with a saison or other farmhouse style that's more heat tolerant. You'll get more predictable results staying within the recommended temperature.


1

One difficulty you'll have with getting that signature shandy flavor when adding fruit to secondary is that the sweetness (sugar) of the juice will get converted to alcohol by the yeast, leaving you with mostly aroma, and a little flavor. A lot of people don't recognize how much sugar plays into the overall taste of the fruit. Without the sugars, it is not ...


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