11

The main difference is the yeast, Ale is brewed with a top fermenting yeast s.cerevisiae[1] whereas Lager is brewed with a bottom fermenting yeast s.pastorianus[2]. From this comes the fermentation temperature, ales are fermented at higher temperatures(14-20 C) than lager(10-12 C). A lager you would also allow to warm towards the end of the primary ...


10

As I understand it, this term comes from the wine world, where it refers to the patterns the glycerine makes on the inside of the glass. Glycerine (glyceryl alcohol or glycerol) is decidedly thicker than ethanol or water, so it forms a clear syrupy ring from which droplets or streamers trail down toward the surface of the beverage. Here's an image of leggy ...


7

Like fire.eagle said, I think the BJCP style guideline is what you are looking for. This is what nearly all home brew competitions use when judging beer. You can also look at the Great American Beer Festival's style guidelines. They break beers out into more categories than the BJCP.


7

What was the starting gravity and ending gravity? Did you confirm that fermentation had completed before bottling? 6g/litre should give around 2.5 volumes of CO2, depending on the final temperature of the beer, according to this tool. That's about right for a Belgian ale. I think your problem is most likely that you bottled the beer before it had finished ...


7

Yes you can. In fact I did it a few times myself, blending too dark beers for my taste with some lighter beers to create the perfect depth. But, if the mixed beers use different yeast strains, it is possible they both have different attenuation levels. The yeast from one beer can continue to ferment the sugars of the other beer. Fermentation starts again ...


6

The BJCP Guidelines give recommended hopping levels for most styles. The amount of bitterness is expressed as International Bittering Units (IBU). The IBU rating for a beer is a function of: quantity of hops, bitterness of hops (alpha acid percentage), boil time, and gravity and volume of wort. There are lots of good IBU calculators on the web. Google for ...


6

The only consideration that comes into bottle choice really is serving size and glass strength due to carbonation levels. (Some highly carbonated styles see thicker glass for safety reasons.) Then there is bottles that will accept corks. Across all the different styles I've encountered in corked bottles I can't say its specific to any style. Again you see ...


6

I'm not sure you're going to find anything besides recipes that are especially prescriptive about what goes in to the beer. Check out BeerSmith, BrewToad, and other sites to find some recipes. They will give you some concrete examples of grain bills for a style. If you're looking for something more broad, check out the BJCP style guidelines, especially the ...


6

In addition to Mr_Roads answer. Lager yeast is unique from ale yeast in that it can breakdown and use melibiose, which is a sugar not fermentable by ale yeasts. This is one reason lagers are generally "cleaner" in mouth feel and residual sweetness over ales with the same recipe.


5

Congratulations on your first brew! I would suggest putting the ingedient details into some brew software many are free in the form of phone apps or web based. Give it a Google. The limited information you have given isn't enough to go on. We need malt type and amount, batch volume, hop weight, age and boil duration of hops to even guess a style based on ...


5

For starters they are different styles of beers. Light lagers have a much lighter mouthfeel almost watery. Cheap commercial versions supplement the mash with corn or rice to keep the ABV high but calories down resulting in Light malt profile. A Regular Lager like Old English or Budweiser have less adjuncts like corn or rice and more true malted grains ...


5

Well, technically, you can only lose up to 3 points for appearance. However, as people "drink with their eyes", I think you'd struggle to do well amongst other witbiers in the category, assuming it's not disqualified up front for being entered out of style. I'd personally enter it as a specialty beer and give enough info that hopefully the judges would ...


5

Simply put, there are two overarching umbrellas in beer... ales and lagers. An IPA is an ale. GENERALLY speaking all beers fit under one of these two umbrellas. Once under one of these umbrellas the main difference is brewing technique. Even if you use the exact same ingredients and technique between a beer with ale yeast and the other with lager yeast, one ...


4

Category 23 is pretty much it. There isn't another category where the flavors of witte would fit with that dark color. People who are making CDA are currently stuck with Cat 23. The secret to cat 23 is making a beer that is completely flawless. So that the "greatness" of it can shine through despite it not having a defined style. Second to that is that ...


3

I would use a Cream Ale yeast, it's actually a blend of lager and ale yeast but ferments well at 65°-70°. Historically cream ales were made to compete with crisp American lagers. Many use California yeast (White Labs WL001) or similar for October style beers as it's about the cleanest of ale yeasts and has minimal esters when you use a larger than normal ...


3

Here is the 2015 BJCP description which a dunkleweisse is judged against. Impression A moderately dark German wheat beer with a distinctive banana-and-clove yeast character, supported by a toasted bread or caramel malt flavor. Highly carbonated and refreshing, with a creamy, fluffy texture and light finish that encourages drinking. Aroma Moderate phenols (...


3

Anything "Noble" that's not a typical American hop like Cascade/Centenial/Chinook/Columbus etc. I'd use Hallertaur, Spalt, Tett, Vanguard, Perle, etc. Basically any of the classic German hops, or their modern equivalent. Honestly in those styles, you just want a touch of hop bitterness to cut the sweetness of the malt. Not many of those beers present much ...


3

I'm with everyone else. 5-7 days. To get that super hoppy aroma though, I've only been able to get that by using a hop back with first-wort and dry-hopping (clone W. Coast ipa, greenflash). For less than $30 I built a hop back and filtered the wort through loose leaf hops of the same or similar variety I was already pellet-hopping, just prior to chilling, ...


3

Trial and error. There is no definite answer. I haven't achieved yet great aroma, so far dry hopped in primary in last couple days. I would add 5 oz per 10gl. Read an article saying its better to dry hop it in keg or closed vessel. Aromas can escape with CO2.


3

Most all lagers if you can lager for months you can have some great beer. Fruit Cream Ales are nice for summer, can be done as ales or lagers, often mixed fermentation with both ale and Lager yeasts. Steer away from hoppy beers as this flavor and aroma is first to fade with age. Brew these in the final weeks of your events. Malty beers meld great with ...


3

These yeast started out with a similar roots s.cerevisiae and diverged some time around the 15th Century, when it is thought to have hybridized with a new world yeast(Saccharomyces eubayanus). It is then likely that the yeast harvesting methods of different brewing techniques progressively selected for more specific varieties. In British and similar ...


3

They are two different species: Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces pastorianus. They both do the same thing--convert sugar into alcohol--but they thrive in different conditions. The main difference is that lager yeasts continue to function at almost-freezing temperatures, while ale yeasts go dormant. The terms 'top-fermenting' and 'bottom-...


3

As well as bitterness, which is addressed by Tobias' answer, hops also provide flavor and aroma. As with bitterness, the BJCP guidelines also lists typical levels of hop flavor and aroma, from none/slight to full/strong for the various styles of beer. As a starting point for a 5 gallon batch, 1/2 oz produces a small amount of flavor or aroma, 1 oz produces ...


3

If you can lay your hands on a Kveik strain, you can make a Norwegian farmhouse ale. Kveik yeast ferments in temperatures up to even 40°C with comparatively little off aromas. A Saison strain will feel alright in a slightly lower temperature spectrum, up to 30°C, maybe slightly over.


3

According to an article on vinepair[1]: "New England IPAs are beers that are purposely hazy or cloudy, which can give these brews a smooth, creamy mouthfeel – a departure from the light/dry mouthfeel you often get with West Coast IPAs – with little to no hop bitterness at the end utilizing hops that impart a tropical, juicy sweetness rather than the classic ...


3

As a home brewer, I consider the style an IPA but it is characterized by the following: Little or no early additions of hops to the boil, 60/30 minutes. (Mash hopping is okay). A heavy late addition of hops to the boil kettle, 15 minutes and below. This can also include hop stands while the wort is cooling, like adding hops when the wort temperature gets ...


3

As farmersteve said that bottle isn't going to work for carbonating. You need a bottle that will be air tight, and to add a priming sugar. Cloudy is to be expected from 100% wheat. About the citrus balance, I think the 1.24oz / 36gm of peel was fine. And the amount of grain was good. You just had poor effenciency. Your OG is about half what it should have ...


2

Wheat beers (hefeweizen/wit) are considered to be particularly good for beginners for the following reasons: They're expected to have fairly high ester and phenol profiles, which can mask other undesirable flavours. They can tolerate a fairly wide range of fermentation temperatures, and the higher end of the range gives more of the banana/bubble gum ...


2

For most of my darker beers, I am adding those darker grains at sparge, not during the main mash. All you really want from them is the color and some roast flavor. Its not really bumping up your gravity that much. Everything from chocolate, to carafa, to darker crystal malts. Add them later when you sparge with water <170 degrees.


2

I am by no means an expert on Porter, but I will tell you that my dark beers got better once I understood that those very dark roasted grains (chocolate, roast barley, etc) can pull down your mash pH too low, and give off chalky, astringent, dry flavors. To get around this, I suggest cold-steeping your dark grains separate from your mash (or steep, if you ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible