11

Mostly the high temperature. You started out at 73° C, which is already at the high side for the alfa-amylase enzymes, which convert the starches into complex sugars. While at this moment, the beta-amylase enzymes, which convert the complex sugars into simple sugars, are not yet denatured, two things work against them: The high temperature, which will ...


9

Your high efficiency is due to using a lot more water than you need, washing every last bit of sugar out of the mash. Ultimately, you want to collect less wort. This will result in a lower efficiency. As such, you'll need to use more grain to account for the lower efficiency. If you had 22L at 17°Bx, then you started with 35L at 10°Bx with 90% efficiency. ...


7

Putting 10.5kg of grain in 11.5 litres of water will kill your efficiency, unfortunately: From Braukaiser: Traditional British style infusion mashes are with about 2-2.5 l/kg (1 - 1.15 qt/lb) very thick and German style mashes are generally much thinner (3.5-5 l/kg / 1.75-2.5 qt/lb). Historically this is rooted in the fact that the latter needed to ...


6

Yes, it will to some extent. Not only will the higher alcohol affect it, but your beer will also be less hoppy and bitter than you intended it to be. Yes, you should always strive to hit your OG, but this is homebrewing....sometimes you'll be low or high. Being high isn't too big a deal because you can always add water to get back to what you intended, at ...


5

"... so far above an efficiency that BeerSmith is aware of" I'm not exactly sure what you mean by this, I'm positive BeerSmith is aware of efficiencies above 73%. It's very common to get higher efficiency on low-alcohol beers with smaller mashes since you're running proportionally more sparge water through each unit of volume of the mash bed, giving more ...


5

There is an efficiency difference - while a lot of the starch in caramel malts have been converted, there is still some remaining that can be extracted in a mash, but not in a steep. Also, the mash is typically done for longer than a steep, plus a sparge, which extracts more sugars from the grain. 30% extraction for a steep seems on the low side - but let's ...


5

More bad news: If you didn't like the OG, you'll probably like the FG even less. This is because higher mash temps produce more complex (and less fermentable) sugars. You want to be making disaccharides like the maltose which will be converted to alcohol, but you probably made a lot of trisaccharides and unfermentable dextrins like maltotriose, etc. If you ...


4

Looks like you are doing it right to me, using those calculators. The only thing that might change your actual # is the calibration temp of your hydrometer. Be sure that it is 20C. Some hydrometers are closer to 15 or 18C, depends on the manufacturer. Although that won't change your OG much. 67% mash efficiency does seem like a normal for BIAB. If the ...


4

I can see that your post mash and post boil gravities are really off. For example you state an estimated post mash gravity 1.037 after correction, but then have 1.030 post boil. This would only be possible if you diluted with water. Post boil will always be higher from the boil off evaporation. In any case, I think the hydrometer calculator is setting you ...


4

65% is not bad. Most recipes only expect 70%, so you're not going to be that far off to begin with if you are getting 65%. I wouldn't do partial mash unless you want to. Use Beer Smith or BrewTarget and just adjust your recipe for your efficiency. Read up on how to calculate efficiency first. Understanding your volumes and gravities at each step will help ...


4

Water chemistry, particularly mash pH, can have a large effect on efficiency. My first step would be to check the pH of the mash and make sure you're in the 5.2-5.8 range (ideally closer to the low end of that range). It's also important to measure volume correctly, have you calibrated whatever you use to measure out water?


4

Forget about the mash timer. A mash is done when there's no more starch. The finer the grain crush, the more mash efficiency you will get. Up until it's so fine that it gets stuck. Finding that balance on a system is usually trial and error. Though in your case you may find other robobrew users and follow thier suggestions. Yes pH and water chemistry play ...


3

I do BIAB, and I don't think protein rest has much with extraction efficiency. Mashout temperature has, however: if wort has lower viscosity due to higher temperature, it will better flow from the grist. Another thing I do is "micro-sparge" with 1-2 liters of water over the grain bag (in my case it's a basket, actually) on top of the kettle. When it comes ...


3

I think that the issue is how both are calculated. http://www.brewersfriend.com/brewhouse-efficiency/ is not accounting for losses in your equipment while beersmith is accounting for losses. I think if you took out the losses in beersmith, you would get the same efficiency as brewersfriend.


3

You could add enough DME to offset the lower than expected starting gravity. However, you run a couple of risks by doing so. Contamination. You'll want to boil the DME in a small amount of water to ensure any foreign organisms are dead. Cool it to room temperature before adding to the fermenter. Also, sanitize everything that comes in contact with the ...


3

Yes there is a risk - with each successive sparge you increase the risk of extracting tannins, causing the beer to taste "puckering"/astringent (think sucking on a teabag.) Before doing extra sparges, should also be sure that the low extraction is because of your lautering efficiency and not because of mash efficiency, so do an iodine test for complete ...


3

It is only since the advent of homebrewing software that brewhouse efficiency has also meant 'to the fermenter'. Before homebrewing got involved, brewhouse efficiency was only known as efficiency 'to the kettle'. There were two flavors, outlined in the bruakaiser article link in mdma's answer, but both involve 'to the kettle'. Also in the BrauKaiser ...


3

Sure, it would change the color, but isn't the color already altered due to the increased density of the wort? By adding water, you'd be diluting the SRM back to what you originally expected. By having a higher extraction yield, you will suffer a slight loss in alpha acid isomerization (likely not all that noticeable with an 8%+/- efficiency difference). ...


3

Don't worry too much about increasing your efficiency. The important thing is is have an accurate measure of it. Your first mash showed an efficiency of 65%, so go with that until you've done more brews and narrowed it down. I don't know much about all grain kits, but they must make some assumption about efficiency and include the corresponding amount of ...


3

Undermodified 6-row barley by itself doesn't have enough enzymes to give you complete conversion of starches to sugars, so you end up with low gravity. Add some highly modified malt (i.e. one with high diastatic power) to help out the 6-row. Here is an article that may help: https://byo.com/stories/issue/item/3604-brewing-by-ratio


3

To start with, I'd figure out the yield as a percentage. I find this number way more useful, especially as maltsters generally provide a yield as a percentage on their analysis sheets. To do this, divide the ppg of the grain by 46 (sucrose ppg). That gives you the percentage of the weight of the grain that will become extract. e.g. 1.037 --> 37/46 = 80.4% ...


3

Refractometer does not read correctly when alcohol is present. It is important only to measure in Brix, never specific gravity. Then use the following conversion calculator to determine the true final gravity and alcohol by volume. Very very important fact that many people miss! https://www.brewersfriend.com/refractometer-calculator/ Based on this ...


2

Palmer is referring to U.S. customary measurements. One U.S. gallon is 3.79 liters. One liter is 0.26 U.S. gallons, or 1.05 U.S. quarts. For the U.S. customary measurement system-impaired (i.e., the whole world except the U.S and maybe parts of the U.K.), a U.S. quart is slightly smaller than a liter, and there are two 8-ounce cups in a pint, two 16-ounce ...


2

It's best to measure as the wort comes to the boil for the reasons you mention - all the wort is at the same temperature and the convection currents have mixed the wort fully, so you get a much more accurate reading.


2

Your efficiency goes down as the gravity of your beer goes up. That's because of the sugar you leave behind when using a "normal" amount of water. In order to increase your effieincy, you need to sparge more. That also means you need to boil longer to drive off the extra water.


2

First, I can't see your images from my work computer so I'll explain it from scratch. Each type of grain (base malt and adjuncts) have a potential yield of sugar. For simplicity's sake, we'll use the "point system" (that is Specific Gravity minus 1 times 1000), so for a Specific Gravity of, say, 1.040, we would say that you have 40 point (1.040-1 = .040, ....


2

If your brewhouse consitantly achieves 95% just use that setting in your recipe/brew software and it will cascade to the grains allowing you to reduce their wieghts to hit a target OG. This will mainly result in a reduction in the base malt, while keeping most specialty grains close to original weights. Or you can estimate by hand, if a recipe is calculated ...


2

If you split a 15 gallon batch into two 7.5 gallon batches, the 30lb grain alone will take up 2.34gallons of volume (30 * 10 / 128), as according to sizing the tun from HowToBrew, grain volume is 10 fluid oz per pound. Plugging in a 7.5 gallon batch at brew365, at a mash thickness of 1.5qt/lb, the water alone is 11.25 gallons. In order to get the mash to fit,...


2

I do BIAB and my efficiency has varied around 70% from 65% to 75%. I've found that something as simple as stirring my mash 3 times in the 60 minute rest and not stirring it can affect that number greatly. You're outside of the realms of common efficiencies in what you're doing. Certainly I know of people using Beersmith who have efficiencies into the 80's....


2

IMHO it is the pH of the mash is the important thing. pH of the source water is not so important - as long as it is not ridiculously high of low. Barley and wheat amylase enzymes work optimally in the presence of calcium ions, one could say they require calcium ions to function. So using totally de-ionised water for mashing/lautering/sparging is not an ...


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