7

Maltodextrin dissolves easily enough that the powder can be added directly to the boil. Beginning, middle, and end are all perfectly acceptable times for the addition. However... I prefer to add unfermentable adjuncts (maltodextrin, lactose) at the same time as the priming sugar, just before I bottle the beer. Boil the maltodextrin in enough water to cover ...


4

If you don't have a secondary then, feel free to add them to your primary. You don't really have to worry much about making additions in your primary, I have done it many times in the past when I lacked a spare FV to use as secondary, and suffered no ill effects. You may just have to add a little more of any flavourings you are adding as some of the flavour ...


3

Primarily its a subject of dietary preference to avoid additional sodium in the diet. However, its a moot point because generally a very small amount of sodium would be being added. Also potassium has a somewhat higher flavor threshold than sodium. Meaning sodium begins to taste saltier sooner than potassium. (at least this is the case on my palate) ...


3

I am assuming that you are making wine. For beer, neither sorbate nor SO2 have a place, since homebrew either creates carbonation from fermentation in the bottle or via CO2 injection in a keg, and usually there is no residual sugar to worry about for "re-fermentation" later in either case given timelines for deciding when to bottle/keg, meaning re-...


3

It's pretty straightforward....they're called "post fermentation additions".


2

Opti-red, is a yeast derived mix of polysacchrides, which are designed to bind to polyphenols/tannis and provide fuller body and better colour stability. I would not add more than the recommended dose, not becuase it will do you harm, but due to the fact the manufacturer has calculated and adding any more is a waste and may advresely affect the finished ...


2

I agree with previous answers: if you have no secondary, there's nothing wrong with chucking whatever you want to add into the primary. However, if your additions are highly aromatic, you may want to add them only after 3 days or so when the fermentation begins to calm down a little, or the vigorous bubbling of the initial fermentation stage may carry off ...


2

Short answers No and No. Although erythritol is an alcohol it does not count against the 'alcohol' tolerance of yeast. When we speak of the alcohol tolerance we are not strictly speaking about all alcohols but Ethanol, Ethyl Alcohol, or drinking alcohol. This is what we refer to when we say yeast is producing alcohol, and what is measured in the ABV on you ...


1

Campden (or rather sodium meta-bisulphite, which is its active ingredient) serves multiple purposes in wine making. It removes chloramine from municipal tap water, but in your case that is unnecessary since you use chlorine-free water. It serves as a microbial inactivator, which means that in low acidity musts (i.e. insufficient acidity to keep microbes in ...


1

yes, go right ahead, that's what I did and it worked out fine.


1

Punchdown refers to the action of pushing down the cap. The cap is formed during maceration by the pomace (the solids) that rise to the surface. Normally punching down the cap twice a day allows the must to be in contact with the pomace to extract more flavour and tannins. To answer your question, after crushing the must will form a cap after a few hours (...


1

I think it would depend on how much yeast was pitched, but the general consensus is that a 1/2 teaspoon per gallon of wine is enough to halt fermentation. So for liters it would be a little more than an 1/8 teaspoon per liter.


1

As far as I know this is a bit of a gray area as far as official terminology. I have experienced several people over-emphasizing finger quotes and suggesting they would "Dry hop" with... cucumber or whatever. I personally dont do too many additions like this but would describe it as "secondary with..." regardless of it being in a primary or secondary vessel. ...


1

More likely than not, your issue is with Phenolic and not Vanilla Extract (although, I would just use beans for brewing). Brad Smith has an excellent write up on that: Phenolics and Tannins in Home Brewed Beer. TL;DR This can be caused by Chloromines in your water (toss a campden tablet in your strike water), wild yeasts (sanitation issues) or mashing at ...


1

5 ml. of lactic acid will be tasteless in your beer. I don't know why it's there, but you can skip it. 5 oz. of dextrose will not make much difference to the beer and is the normal amount used for bottle priming. Are you sure it isn't for that? Unmalted wheat flakes have no enzymes and can't be used without mashing with a base malt to convert the ...


1

I've had some excellent beer, such as Lost Abbey Judgement Day that used raisins or prunes in secondary, which give a very rich, caramel flavor that compliments big malty high alcohol and aged styles.


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