13

'Is this possible that beer could be brewed up somehow with weed?' Sure, in the same way you can put any sort of anything in your beers, as long as you think it will taste good. But to answer the more important question: '[W]ould you get the effects of both beer and pot both?' It would very much depend on how you used it in the process. THC, the ...


11

Yes, it is OK squeeze. In fact, you want as much extract as possible from the specialty malts. It is a common myth that squeezing the grain bag is a bad idea due to "tannins being extracted" or similar. There is no reason for this to be true --- tannins are extracted from the grain (husk) only if the temperature during steeping/mashing is too high. And then ...


6

The sludge is mostly coagulated proteins, hop residue. A little bit is actually good for your wort, as it provides nutrients for the yeast. Too much might give the beer some slight off flavours. If you were to let the sludge into the fermenter, it wouldn't be the end of the world, but you'll make better beer if your exclude most of it. So, to answer your ...


6

The only way to know is to look at the OG. LME has 36 ppg and DME has about 45. In the recipe you mention, the OG is 1.038 for 5 gal. and it calls for 6 lb. of extract. Assuming LME, 36*6=216. Divide by 5 for 5 gal. and you get 43ish. That's darn close to the OG listed and DME would make the OG even higher, so that particular recipe must be for LME. ...


5

Absolutely! I rinse after use then throw them in with my laundry whites. Couple tips. These don't have to be sterile or even sanitized. A good rinse is really the only functional need they have. If washing with laundry. Use fragrance free detergent with an extra rinse cycle. I just use oxyclean. Makes them soft and bright again. Air / line dry them. Don'...


5

Wait!!! Does the beer taste good? If so, just leave it, it wont be as bitter as the recipe sure, but good beer is good beer. It's probably OK. Hop additions are numbered by the amount of boil time in minutes. So a 60 minute addition boils for 60 minutes, and a 0 minute (or "flameout") is added at the end of the boil. So given you reversed your hop ...


5

Control over color is the first thing and the biggest. Even the lightest DME will make beer darker than an all grain made with pilsner to the same gravity. Control over body. All extract, DME included, tends to finish a little higher in gravity points post fermentation than when brewing with all grain. There are ways to help improve the difference in ...


4

When I was extract brewing, that's exactly how I did every batch. I put 2 gallons of Poland Spring in the fridge, then added that to the wort that I cooled down to 120F or so in the sink. Really worked a treat, and still made great beer. As for inducing cold break, I can't say if it's better or worse than using an immersion chiller, but I definitely got a ...


4

Yes, you use the wort you create by steeping as part of your boil volume. The method looks fine. I wouldn't worry about steeping efficiency. You won't get more than a few gravity points out of it unless you steep several pounds of grain. Also, be aware that not all grains are suitable for steeping. Some need an actual minimash.


4

The major bitter compound in hops, the so-called alpha acids, aka humulone, is a terpenoid (derived from terpenes). The primary active ingredient in that "herb" you're smoking, the tetrahydrocannabinoids, are also terpenoids. Both Humulus lupulus (hops) and Cannabis sativa (marijuana) are, in fact, two genera in the family Cannabinaceae. It is entirely ...


4

Bandaid flavors in beer can come from a couple of sources. I wouldn't blame the water first, my guess it's Brettanomyces which is a spoilage yeast. It can give a variety of flavors but one of the bad ones is bandaid flavors. It's a common problem in beer and wine where sanitation has not been the best. This is my first guess. Another source could be your ...


4

Apart from your carpet, Everything Is Ok. It's very normal during the active fermentation stage that a large amount of vigorous yeast comes to the top of the brew. If the amount of beer enables the foam to reach the top of the vessel (a carboy in this case), it will be pushed out through the air-lock. The airlock may also become clogged with yeast, bits ...


4

Cost - It costs much less per batch (in the long run) to make beer from grain Control - You have much more control over the brewing process. Time - I know you said you know this, but this is the main reason people go extract. The mash time adds over an hour to your brewing day from getting the water up to temperature to mashing to running off the wort. Add ...


3

You want to preserve the ratio of 2-row to Crystal 60L. Here is one simplified way to do the math. 2-Row has an average, theoretical extract yield of 1.036 specific gravity -- if you take the last two digits (36), you can express this as 36 gravity points per pound of grain per gallon of wort (PPG) at 100% efficiency. The recipe assumes a mash ...


3

Nope, at this level everything scales pretty linearly; double up!


3

It does not need to be 5.00000 gallons, don't worry about the small differences. You can aerate after pitching the yeast, so long as it's immediately after; the yeast need oxygen during the lag phase, but once alcohol starts being produced, you don't want to introduce oxygen at that point.


3

According to figures from the American Homebrewers Assoc. and retail groups, most homewbrewers brew with extract. All grain requires more time, equipment, and effort. Obviously, a lot of people feel it's worth it, but more people have constraints on time, money and space. For those people, extract is the only way they can brew.


3

All of these retailers are in competition with each other, which keeps margins and prices pretty low. The only way you might be able to squeeze out a better deal is finding an online retailer that is physically closer to you (to reduce shipping costs). And/or wait for clearance sales. Breaking out of pre-packaged kits will let you bulk order ingredients to ...


3

Just for an alternative perspective on brew shops in your locality. Establishing a relationship with a good proprietor / staff will allow you to trade ideas / recipes / advice often at a similar price to online retailers; in fact, the kits I purchase tend to be cheaper if shipping is taken into account. Also good brew shops will often point you in the ...


3

It it dry or liquid malt extract? Dry malt extract will dissolve into the water, leading to a minimal volume change, whereas liquid malt extract still has a substantial portion of water, and will have somewhat like the volume change you describe, though I don't believe it's quite 1:1. In short, your boil volume should be the boil volume. With dry extract, ...


3

I would recommend NOT boiling the malt extract. There is absolutely no point in doing so. The extract is already sterile and at best only needs pasteurisation which can be done by dissolving the extract in several litres of near boiling water in the fermentation vessel when making up the wort. The flavour comes in the main from the steeped grain and hops and ...


3

I live in the south of England where it has recently been even colder than "oop North". At this time of year I go with the seasons and brew the year's supply of lager(!!!). Its perfectly lagered and crisp by summer. However to answer the particular question - yes, I brew ales, light and dark, during the winter months at "less than room temperature" and they ...


3

From what I've seen/heard, the vast majority of quality comes from your process and the freshness of your ingredients. Get the freshest extracts, hops, and yeast you can start brewing! Over time you'll learn what you can do to improve your brew with your own limitations. But as long as you can get hops, malt, and yeast (and water), you should be in good ...


2

You may also find that an immersion chiller does not have to be a major investment. Where I live, my ground water stays fairly cool year round. So a simple immersion chiller is all I need to cool 6 gallons in about 15 min. I just purchased; 20' of 1/2" ID soft copper tubing (in a roll), a 10' roll of 1/2" ID clear vinyl tubing, a connection for a garden hose ...


2

You're making a real lager, so try to keep the temps as low as possible - around 50F/10C would be about ideal. (The fermentation will raise temperature this by about 6F/3C.) But if you don't and let it warm up, it will still be a lager - it's because of the yeast - S-23 is a true lager strain (Saccaromyces pastorianus). Lager yeast tend to produce sulphur -...


2

Those old Brew Your Own recipes are a little vague on ingredients, and hard to figure out. You have an added handicap of being in the Eurozone, it seems. Likely the 3.3 bs. of amber light extract is LME (because in the U.S. they sell it in 3.3 lb. cans and plastic milk jugs), and you can substitute a 1.5 kg can of Coopers Light Malt Extract or the Premium ...


2

I always put the grain bag in a strainer and pour 2-4 quarts of 155-160f water slowly through the bag to remove anything additional from grains. This is the extract brewer's sparge equivalent. I've never read anywhere that squeezing was a good thing, but I have read from several reliable sources that it's a bad thing.


2

As far as I understand, the hop utilization is affected by the specific gravity of the wort. E.g, the Daniels formula for calculating IBUs takes the boil gravity into account. My only source is this ppt :) Steeping grains does not substantially increase the gravity and should thus not affect hop utilization. According to Daniels, brewing with a boil ...


2

If you're using a Northern Brewer extract kit like this one, you should get pretty close to the OG if you fill your fermenter to 5 gallons. A good kit should account for some of the water evaporating away during the boil. It should also assume that some hop residue (trub) will be left behind in the boil kettle. The wort that you pour from the kettle into ...


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