Hot answers tagged

10

It's a combination of human perception and physical science. Volatile compounds are less volatile at cold temperatures (physical chemistry), and the human nervous system is dulled or numbed slightly at colder temperatures (human). This is the same reason why the Brits like to drink their beer "warm" (not ice cold = more flavor), and why the mega brewers ...


7

For some hands on learning with less effort required than brewing several SMASH batches, you can dry hop some bland beer as explained here. I did not write that nor have I tried it yet but it looks like an interesting experiment.


7

Citra is a good bet for grapefruit aromas. Check this link for a nice tool to help with hopping your beers https://www.hopunion.com/aroma-wheel/


7

I think the primary factor would be how much you're dry-hopping with. More hops means more of the volatile aromatic compounds that produce those aromas. Most of the recipes I've seen call for somewhere from 1 to 4 ounces of hops in the fermenter but I've heard of people using as many as 10+ ounces for dry-hopping. I'm not sure how that matches up with what ...


7

In addition to the other answers which I agree with. Late boil additions are very important too at last 1-5 minutes or whirlpool. These add a "deep" aroma for lack of a better term. They seem to bond to the wort at this temp and hang on through fermentation. Dry hopping in early fermentation while does add aroma and flavor tends to have much of it blown ...


6

An biology take on it: Aroma: Perceived through your nose Flavor: Mostly perceived through your tongue although the aroma also helps your brain on forming the overall impression (think how things taste 'bland' when your have a flu and your nose is blocked)


5

From my experience thesquaregroot got it mostly rigtht - fresh hops and sufficient quantity. There is one more really important factor. As far as my experiments go, 4 days before adding hops and bottling are optimal. Any more or less time means less aroma - it either didn't dissolve in your beer yet, or already started to evaporate. And never, ever dry-hop ...


4

MBT (more often referred to as skunking or light-struck) is an off-putting flavor and aroma characteristic that is intuitively named after the animal which is well known for dispensing what is considered to be the Satan's post-apocalyptic butthole of all off-flavors. The chemical composition and odor of MBT (3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol) is very similar to ...


4

Great question on a topic that I don't think is discussed much by homebrewers since we tend to stick to ales. This is a more significant issue for creating clean lagers..or at least a more obvious problem in lagers when present. Greg Noonan's New Brewing Lager Beers is about the only place I've found a solid discussion of the topic. On pp 170-171: "...


4

In terms of the basic senses, flavor comes from the sense of taste, which is primarily from the tongue. There are 5 types of flavor the tongue can detect: sweet, sour, salt, bitter and savory (the last one is a relatively new discovery.) Our sense of smell can detect an almost infinite number of different smells, since a single smell is really a combination ...


4

A cheesy smell usually means you have bacteria in your mash and they have access to oxygen. If this were a sour-mashed beer it would be considered a lost cause at this point. I don't know how this kit is supposed to work, but it's sounds like sanitation is the issue.


4

Some yeast strains give sulfur smell during fermentation. That's perfectly normal. If it's in the air, it's no longer in your brew! The fact you can smell it so strongly indicates it is, literally, going away now. It comes from metabolism of sulfur amino-acids. Sooner they are degenerated and sulfur is released, the less chance it'll get released in the ...


3

Keep in mind that making cider is a lot more like making wine than making beer. I ferment my ciders for several months. That allows time for them to clear and for off aromas to ferment out.


3

Sulphur is (unfortunately) a side product in some fermentations. Lagers also tend to throw a LOT of sulphur during fermentation! The good news is: If you can smell it, it means it is no longer in your cider! :) Unless you are making a very strong cider, I do not think that adding nutrients now will make a difference. Your fermentation should be nearly ...


3

One thought I have is it's due to incomplete fermentation. Cold crashing a beer after a week will not necessarily make the best beer. Try leaving it in primary for 3 weeks and see if it improves.


3

The smell is hard to describe, especially to someone who grew up where there are no skunks. It is not really useful for me to tell you it smells like skunk musk. I have heard some of those people describe it as the smell of burnt rubber, body odor combined with burnt popcorn, sour coffee, or certain strains of aromatic marijuana. You really have to try it ...


3

I believe you are detecting the sulfur produced by the yeast. Hefe or Wit yeast in wheat beers can absolutely produce this compound, so its not unusual to encounter. I've had it appear a few times before, and I believe it fades out over time. I mostly keg, but I can recall getting strong sulfur production in a Hefe with WLP351, which was bottled and seemed ...


3

A great way to learn the distinct flavors of hops/grains is SMaSH (Single Malt and Single hop) brewing. By using a single grain and a single hop you can really focus on one flavor at a time. So if you make a beer that is 100% cascade, you can expect to taste a flowery and spicy, grapefruit flavor. Once you get a feel for what that tastes like move on to a ...


3

Was the sample you tasted very very cold? Cold temperatures diminish the body's ability to perceive flavours. I've never found carbonation effects the hop aroma in a hugely significant way. An easy fix would be to add some cascade directly to the fermenter, leave for 3 days, then bottle. This gives lots of hop aroma as primary fermentation is finished (...


2

Just today I read the brief descriptions of Herkules and Hallertauer Merkur in Stan Hieronymus's "For the Love of Hops". FWIW, a summary: Herkules is described as "smoothly bitter, a reminder that assessing cohumulone's role is complicated." No discussion of aroma, so I'd follow your nose with this one. Hallertauer Merkur is described as "a bittering hop ...


2

With the hops you have listed, I'd go with Challenger or Target, and keep the IBU's in the 20-25 range to minimize the flavor. For the Dry Hopping, about an ounce in a 5gal batch is detectable, while a radio of 1:1 ounces/gallons is the standard way to get pungent dry-hop goodness. If you want the dry hop aroma to be fairly strong, I'd split the batch into ...


2

I think you've got 2 problems here: 1) The first is that the hop aroma disappeared almost immediately after opening the bottle..... I let the wort cool in an ice bath, and it took about 2 hours to cool. These two things are connected. When you add the Cascade hops right at the very end of the boil, their purpose was to impart some nice, American-...


2

As Tobias nicely put, there isn't much you can do about the colour. Although, I would not think too much about it having "much more of an amber color than most double IPA's I have seen". Unless you distinctly are looking for a specific colour, I would bother thinking about it. When it comes to the aroma I would suggest that you review your hop schedule; ...


2

There's not much you can do about the colour, aside from pick a different kit. The colour is a result of the mix of grains used to make the extract. To get more hop aroma, you could try dry hopping with couple ounces of a nice aroma hop like Cascade. After fermentation has completed, add two ounces of hops to the beer. Some brewers like to put the hops in ...


2

Yes, yes, and not necessarily. (1) You usually get hop aromas from the airlock during initial fermentation. (2) The aroma has always disappeared after a few days. The hop aroma is coming through the airlock, so the fermentation is clearly producing and pushing CO2 gas through the airlock (or leaking from a leaky bucket seal) - CO2 gas that also has picked ...


2

Both Denny Conn and mdma were correct to some extent. I am not able to pick who answered the question fully at this go of it. So I’ll answer with my own results and hope others experiment further to dial in the process. I planned on splitting a 5 gallon batch all along for comparison so I wouldn't feel it wasn't wasted if it didn't turn out. The design ...


2

A hop tea may work. However, the bitterness extracted from hops at pH > 6 becomes progressively harsher with higher pH. Thus, to get a more rounded bitterness, you should not boil in plain water, which has a pH > 7. You could try boiling the hops in a little of the fermented beer, since this will have pH in the ball park of what you need. (Fermented beer is ...


2

If you in future experience these tea flavours or aromas, when not using Whirlfloc, then they may be due to tannins. If it is a bitter stewed tea flavour, that could have been tannins extracted from the mash. If the pH raised too far or the temperature of the sparge water was too high >77C then there is a chance these tea like flavours came from the mash not ...


2

When the bug is ready to use, it should NOT smell like fresh ginger. The ginger bug should smell like ginger at first, and then as the days go by and you add more ginger and sugar it starts to develop a yeasty/alcoholic smell. The bug is made to get the yeast culture going, so it makes sense that it smells like that. I can still smell the ginger in mine,...


2

Centennial will give a pronounced grapefruit flavor.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible