10

The best way to get started is to find out if you have a friend, co-worker, or other acquaintance who brews and is willing to brew a batch or two with you. This is ideal as you don't need to buy anything to get started -- your friend will have it all. Of course, bringing a six-pack or buying the batch's ingredients is always a good gesture :). If you find ...


10

B-Brite is an active-oxygen-based cleaner, and these do a good job of making the item sanitary. While they are not classified as sanitizers, that is mainly because of the formal requirements and certification procedures, but in practice they can do a good job of sanitizing. I know people that use only ChemPro, Oxiclean and other active oxygen based cleaners ...


8

How to Brew: Everything You Need To Know To Brew Beer Right The First Time by John J. Palmer.


7

If the bucket is a mess you should be cautious about using it to ferment in - the main downside to buckets is that easy access to the internal surfaces makes it easy to scratch. Scratches are potentially difficult to clean, and so are a possible source of contamination. Here is a an article on identifying food grade buckets. tl;dr - look for the recycling ...


7

There are many different styles of beer, and it is generally accepted that beer is brewed from malted grain (in almost all cases at least some portion is barley), water, hops and yeast. The different styles get their flavors from the types of grain used, the varieties of hops, and the strain of yeast. Note that mead is not beer -- it is brewed from honey, ...


6

I'd collect: The recipe: grain bill, hops and their times, adjuncts and their times, amount of water. That way you can try to recreate the same beer if it was good. You can tweak any of grain bill, hops, timing, and so on to see how the beer changes. Once you get more advanced, take other readings: You already mentioned gravity. When you brew all-grain, ...


6

Here's a couple reading I find important that many over look. All-grain. Mash pH is very important. Doing an iodine test during the mash is a good practice to check if conversion is done. Why mash for 90 min if it's done at 45? Water chemistry. Most home brewers build thier own profile from RO. Then many have great local water. Knowing what's in it will ...


6

Toss them in the laundry with your whites. No farbric softner. Then air dry.


6

Mistake 1, really doesn't matter all will be fine. You may end up with a little more bitterness extraction, but is has been reported that FWH can lead to a more mellow bitterness. I really would not worry at all. Mistake 2, not really all should be fine You would get a cleaner flavour profile if you had used 2 packets of yeast,but your yeast should be ...


5

It's not the end of the world if you don't re-hydrate the yeast. The sediment will settle out over the next couple of weeks. Don't worry, the beer will be fine.


5

Tbh I'm not sure what the question is. Palmer in one of Brew Strong podcasts says that approx 80% of all conversion occurs within the first 20 minutes or so. Longer mash time is required to finish conversion of remaining "long tail". Brulosophy's Marshall Schott also says you can cut total mash time from 60 to 45 minutes without much impact on the taste and ...


5

"Rafts" or anything floating at this stage sounds infected. If you had good fermentation it's unlikely it will be harmful to sample. Open one, see if you can recover the floaty. If its white / creamy color. I would sample taste the beer. If it's blue / black. Dump em.


5

Once you have cold crashed there will still be enough yeast to carb up your beer, given enough time. I suggest leaving your beers in primary for your usual amount of time, but racking to secondary and leaving for a couple of days before you bottle, to allow any sediment kicked up in transfer to settle out. If you are bottling with a few grams of sugar per ...


5

During fermentation a thick layer of brown, gunky foam forms on top of the wort and sticks to the walls of the fermenter. This layer is known as the Krausen (from the German word "Kräus" which means "curly" or "frizzy"). This is why the high growth or attenuation phase is also sometimes also referred to as "high Krausen". Even if no bubbles can be seen to ...


5

You do have the answer in your question. When brewing my first kit, I put the sugar in each bottle and here is my experience: Have to measure sugar for each bottle, difficult and time consuming when using different sizes. I did experience gushing when filling bottles that had sugar in them I did get a few bottles that where not as good (due to sugar not ...


4

It sounds like you do a good job cleaning by dismantling the tap, and that's really the key - storing the fermentor clean so that it can be effectively sanitized when next needed. Make sure it is drained and completely air dry before adding any seal or you'll get stale water in there. That can mean another round of cleaning to get rid of the odor.


4

If you're using a pre-hopped extract, no boil brewing is possible. All extracts have already been boiled by the manufacturer anyways; with extracts, the main purpose behind boiling is you need the higher temperatures to cause isomerization of the hop acids so the hop bitterness gets into the beer. Secondary reasons for boiling extracts are additional protein ...


4

As Denny mentioned, head formation is primarily related to protein though dissolved carbonation level will also have something to do with it. If you're adding a fixed amount of priming sugar to a single pressure vessel, as you dispense beer, the increased amount of headspace will allow some of the CO₂ to leave the beer, making it flatter. You do not want to ...


4

Sounds like a vigorous, but otherwise normal fermentation. Rack to secondary, if that's your process, or leave it in the carboy for another week or two before bottling. The krausen residue on the walls of the carboy won't affect the final beer. In the future you might consider using a blow-off tube instead of an airlock.


4

While these are nice lists I would like to point out that you do not need a 5 gallon bucket and carboy. I like to experiment with new recipes using a two gallon bucket and an old one gallon apple cider jug. Cheap, easy, and provides 8 bottles of beer in much less (brew day) time than a five gallon batch.


4

This is not a great hobby if your goal is to save money on beer costs. It takes a long time to recoup the cost of equipment when you save pennies per glass. And there is always more equipment to try... That being said, the cheapest and lowest risk way to get into the hobby with making one-gallon batches. You can get a one-gallon recipe/ingredient kit from ...


4

Joy of Homebrewing by Charlie Papazian. This is the only intro you'll need to successfully inoculate yourself into the beer making culture. Relax, don't worry, and have a homebrew!


4

If anything it likely helped get them carbonated faster. Assuming you let the sediment that gets stirred up by moving settle before drinking, there is no harm in moving bottles.


4

No you are just fine. Relax, Denny Conn says "Barley wants to be turned into beer" and that is a great realization in this hobby, just make sure the yeast are fermenting...and enjoy the brew. Fermentation is often a smelly affair, but our yeast friends are great guests as they clean up after the party.


4

Your best bet is doing a partial boil brew, boiling 2 gallons of concentrated wort then adding 3 gallons sanitary water to the fermentor for 5 gallon batch. Typically this is done with extracts. Would be challenging to do as BIAB, all grain. If you want to do full volume boil. I would suggest attempting to boil just water in the volume you want. 16k btu ...


4

It's a great idea. Everybody loves to overcomplicate nutrient additions. I don't. Just add them at the beginning, it works fine.


4

It’s normal, but if you have a very good balloon on there, it might not pass air quickly enough. You can loosen it a touch to let some air out from time to time, but I highly recommend you spend $4 on a bung and airlock combo from Amazon.


3

You definitely just need to wait longer. I always wait at least two weeks, more for higher gravity beers. Waiting will not only improve the quality of the head and carbonation level, but almost everything else about the beer will get better if you give it more time. A side note on your step 6, it's best to keep splashing to a minimum when racking after ...


3

Carbonating the beer from priming sugar takes at least a week, often closer to 2 to be ready. The problem here is that you were sampling a too early: After another couple of days I was tapping off nice pints of dark ale under reasonable pressure (at least I thought it was reasonable pressure - it might not have been) but with no head. I'd only tap a ...


3

I assume you mean 40°F, then yes way too cold. it won't harm the existing yeast organisms, but even for lager yeast that is too cold for primary fermentation. so basically we do things at certain temps for a reason... we try to pitch yeast at a temperature that gives them the advantage over other contaminant organisms. warm your wort to the primary ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible