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15

Some brewers have a unwarranted paranoia about oxygen and beer. Relax. If there were literally a "few bubbles" in the keg then I very much doubt it will cause the beer to oxidise. If the beer was not micro-filtered then remaining yeast in solution will use any dissolved oxygen quite quickly.


7

There's a small risk that by removing the beer from the bulk of the yeast, your attenuation might be lower. That is, the beer might end up lower alcohol and sweeter than otherwise. However, as long as you pitched enough healthy yeast and the fermentation was vigorous, you're unlikely to see any problems. Don't do anything at this point. The beer should ...


7

By being safe and deliberate with your racking methods, I doubt you'll have much of a problem. I believe a fair amount of the problems stem from lack of improper methods of racking (among other things). Some of the things that cause oxidation include: Not getting the siphon tube to sit in the bottom of carboy/bucket/keg while transferring Getting a lot of ...


6

Oxidization happens when there is oxygen dissolved in the beer, such when the beer is splashed or agitated in air. I've always been careful with racking, using either a regular siphon started by blowing into the carboy (through a sanitary air filter) or via an autosiphon. About 2 years ago, I had oxidization problems in a few batches which appeared after ...


5

Some widely respected people advise against it, like: Racking to prevent autolysis is not necessary Whilst it might be true, in some cases, it is not true in case of strong stuff, stuff that will stay in fermenter long time. See wine resources - for yeast wine with nutrient is not so different than wort. And even if this particular part, this one reason ...


4

"Because I'm wondering if the whole "oxidation" concern is really only applicable to someone who is splish-splashing around in the kitchen." In a word, yes.


4

Yes, is is a problem. After primary fermentation, one of the most important staling agents your homebrew will face is oxygen. Pouring will almost guarantee the introduction of oxygen, whereas siphoning minimizes it.


4

You can use the pressure from fermentation to transfer from the fermenter to a serving keg. First, you'll want a spunding valve on the fermenter to control the pressure by releasing gas after the target pressure has been reached. When fermentation is complete, pressurize the serving keg with CO2 to slightly less pressure than what's showing on the ...


4

I think what will end up happening is something like… After lag and reproduction, the yeast will start to ferment, and pressure will build up on the fermenting corny. This will slowly push still-fermenting wort into the second carboy, though perhaps following some of the trub that will have settled out first. At some point, the two cornys will reach an ...


4

Depend on a lot of factors. If it was in fermenter only two weeks, one or two more should not hurt. For light beers, under 6% ABV, I never kept them over a month. But I do have few fermenters 3 or 4 weeks old now, waiting to be bottled somewhere next week. Oldest is strongest, of course. For big beers, it was few months between pitch and bottling, and dang, ...


4

It shouldn't be a big problem.


3

I just finished a nut brown: OG:51 FG:10. Left it on the primary yeast cake for three weeks and it turned out great. Lots of people are suggesting no secondary these days, and a little longer in the primary. So, in answer to your question: let it rest while you rest. It'll be just fine.


3

From my experience, unless you are trying to stop/stun an active fermentation, you should not rack until your primary fermentation is either done or mostly done. If you racked too early, then there may not be enough yeast left to finish cleanly in a reasonable time, which could lead to yeast stress, a stalled ferment, or a very sluggish finish. You'll need a ...


3

It is okay, and you didn't introduce any "bad things". More than likely, you have pitched a sub-optimal or basically-reasonable quantity of yeast into wort with very little dissolved oxygen, and the yeast are just having a very long lag phase. What was your pitch like (dry yeast? liquid? age? amount? starter?). What's the ambient temp of the fermentor? In ...


3

I see a potential problem in that as the first waves of beer flow out into the secondary keg, they aren't yet done fermenting. So its like you're racking some of the beer to secondary on the very first day of fermenation. I would worry that this would shock the yeast somehow in the secondary keg and you'd get a stalled out fermentation there. Furthermore, ...


3

Unless you were fermenting very cold or had a high starting gravity, I imagine fermentation was actually done after 7 days and the beer moved on to conditioning. The way to know is to measure the SG - signs such as airlock activity and kraeusen falling are not accurate ways to monitor the brew - the SG is the key here, and that will tell you when ...


3

An interesting point when considering initial and possible secondary fermenter: If we’re going to let the beer sit after its main fermentation is done, it pretty much needs to be in glass, and away from the spent yeast that accumulates at the bottom of your fermenter. - Secondary Fermentation, Pros and Cons. I am a noob focussing on IPA, and so far have ...


3

In general you should wait for fermentation to be completed in the primary, then rack to your secondary. So it means waiting to have a stable specific gravity for 3 days. In my opinion, I don't think you need to wait any longer to allow yeast to clean the byproducts of fermentation, as it can be done in the secondary as well. Yeast will do it's job, no ...


3

If you're racking onto fruit then a second fermentation from the fruit is expected, so the main thing you need to wait for is a noticeable active fermentation to end. The main reason for this is that heavy fermentation will pull off the fruit aromas you're trying to keep as the CO2 leaves solution. For a fast fermenting yeast you might need to wait 3 days, ...


3

There is really no right or wrong answer here, especially with the anecdotal (and some scientific) evidence coming to light over the past years. Most books on homebrewing, and indeed most advice online, on adding fruit repeats the advice given for dry hopping: Wait until active fermentation has stopped (no bubbling out of the airlock, gravity is stable over ...


3

It's fine. There's plenty of yeast in suspension to complete your fermentation. Any yeast or sediment that was left behind in the primary is of little use and this beer won't miss it. Let it ride out in this vessel until you hit TG. 1.020 is a little sweet for a pale.


3

Yes, this is how most wine is made and aged before it's bottled. It's not uncommon for red wines to sit in a barrel or a stainless tank for 2-3 years. As long as you keep the sulfite levels in the right range, you can keep it like that for literally years. As for sulfites before bottling, again you want them to be at a level (as high as 200ppm) to prevent ...


3

It is not uncommon to have SG fall that far after about 9 days. Adding extra sugar at any point, at beginning, end, or at this point in between, is a matter of preference. Be aware that the added sugar will continue to ferment to dryness and will simply increase the alcohol, unless you pasteurize or otherwise treat to kill off the yeast early. In my ...


3

You can rack at any point, just be careful not to over expose your cider to air, to avoid oxidation. There are tips (mostly for wine, but still) for that here: Oxidation of red wine during racking and bottling Personnaly, for my ciders and my wines, I prefer to rack the first time just before the end of fermentation. The main reason is that fermentation ...


2

A lot of brewers use silicone tubing for hot liquids, but there's no reason aside from cost not to use it for racking as well. That will take if the tubing part but you've still got to deal with the racking cane which is rigid. Copper or stainless tubing could be bent into the correct shape.


2

My viewpoint is: 1. Rack to a glass 2ndary after 1 week - assuming you have no active carbonation. 2. Dry hop in the 2ndary, although it is a pain if you are using dried hops vs pellets :( A trusted friend (Dean) who went from "best homebrewer I knew" to successful professional always cautioned me AGAINST racking as "not worth the risk of contamination" I'...


2

No reason why not. It's just cider. Though the lees will give you some weird flavors. And bad gas.


2

Its best to make a great wheat beer and mix it in the glass. That's how its done traditionally and you can make it to suit your taste that day. Just because our American commercialized culture is putting them in the same bottle doesn't mean its the best way to do it. They have access to more tools than we do as homebrewers for controlling the post ...


2

Don't wash with wort, you won't get the chance. It will take off before what you want to extract settles. Just rack on top the cake and use it for what it is. As long as you practice good sanitation to the fermentor while racking the old beer out and the new in you can keep it longer. Use a sanitary siphon style cane, or wrap the cane and access port with ...


2

It's probably as safe as anything in a sanitary environment, though if I'm understanding you correctly it means another, however small, potential window of exposure to dangerous microbes since you're racking twice. I've reused yeast a few times to no ill effect, but a lot of literature advises against doing it more than that. It also sounds like more work ...


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