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6

Just becasue you don't use secondary doesn't mean you can't rack to a bottling bucket and bottle from that. That's what I do. So, to answer the question directly, the best way to bottle from a primary is to not bottle from a primary!


6

'Is there a disadvantage to screening my grain to remove the flour before mashing?' Aside from your point about losing extract (the most important thing, really), a few things I can think of: Fine flour disproportionately represents potential extract, by weight. "Fine grits and flour [...] yield some 50-60 % of the weight of milled malt but 80-90% of the ...


6

You are absolutely correct. Unless something is dissolved into the liquid, or there's so much trub that the hydrometer is sitting on top of it, the reading will be unaffected.


4

Great question on a topic that I don't think is discussed much by homebrewers since we tend to stick to ales. This is a more significant issue for creating clean lagers..or at least a more obvious problem in lagers when present. Greg Noonan's New Brewing Lager Beers is about the only place I've found a solid discussion of the topic. On pp 170-171: "...


4

I stop chilling my ales when the surface temp/outlet pipe is about 21 degrees C. It takes me about 40 minutes to chill 50 litres from boiling 100C down to 21C, so I guess in total I give the beer about an hour to settle after the boil is finished before draining into the ferm bins. Cheers!


4

Cold crash to help sediment and compact yeast. Safely tip the carboy 10-15° so you can maximize beer extraction at the end of racking (I use a couple of paperbacks). Do any movement or tipping of your carboy hours before racking so any disturbance can re-settle. Very carefully lower your racking arm down into the sediment bed. Use some sort of spacer so the ...


4

I think the word "Yeast" or "Yeat" or "Yest" (hard to tell from old writings) was commonly used in England (and probably America) around Washington's time. I quickly found a recipe book from England c. 1700 and quickly found a beer recipe and they mention using "yest" or "yeat" twice in the recipe. I'm pretty sure they used the dregs from one batch to ...


3

It is okay, and you didn't introduce any "bad things". More than likely, you have pitched a sub-optimal or basically-reasonable quantity of yeast into wort with very little dissolved oxygen, and the yeast are just having a very long lag phase. What was your pitch like (dry yeast? liquid? age? amount? starter?). What's the ambient temp of the fermentor? In ...


3

I like the stainless steel racking cane with the orange seal. (Steril Siphon Starter) https://www.morebeer.com/products/sterile-siphon-starter-3-5-6-65-gallon-carboy-smooth-necks.html?site_id=9 What's unique with this cane is You can actually move it to the side of a carboy about 2/3rds down and see what you're doing. The red top is visible in even dark ...


3

First of all, once you remove the trub bulb, there is no need to add another one. If you don't add another trub bulb and open the valve, how are you getting your "glub"? The idea is, attach the bulb before you rack in your wort and pitch yeast, transfer the wort and open the valve (that way your hand is on the valve and you can verify that nothing is ...


3

If the trub is actually physically holding the hydrometer up, preventing it from moving down, then unambiguously: yes, the trub will render your hydrometer reading useless. If, on the other hand, the trub is suspended in the liquid, it is a mixed bag. Suspended solids will impact a hydrometer reading, but for brewers it is usually very minimal. The only ...


3

Yes, apparently you can. There's a recipe for it here: http://marmitelover.blogspot.no/2011/04/how-to-make-your-own-marmite.html The author says she uses 'top fermentation from a brewery' - which I imagine is the krausen, although on a homebrew scale I wonder if that gives enough yeast. She also mentions that it doesn't taste like the original - lacking ...


3

"The best way to obtain yeast is to skim it from the krausen of a currently fermenting beer." -John Palmer, How to Brew It may be tough in the jugs your are using but taking some of the krausen is the best way to get the yeast. Source http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter6-8.html


2

Generally you will have few commercial brewers that will reuse it more than 5 or 6 times with out re-culturing; and re-scaling up a starter. Ignoring mutation it could theoretically last for ever, but we cannot ignore this. For ale yeasts you would ideally top crop at high krausen and repitch within 24/48 hours. For a lager yeast you would bottom cop and ...


2

I use Cold Crashing with my 30L fermenter and it has significantly increased my yield whilst reducing sediment in the bottom of each bottle. If you're using a bucket or similar fermenter with a tap then there is minimal risk of disturbing the trub cake during bottling.


2

Wiki says that trub is German for lees. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trub_(brewing)


2

Gratz on your second brew! This is just speculation from the limited info. Detailed steps and ingredients will help in the future. If there is actual liquid volume missing from the fermentor, then it left in the form of foam out the airlock or someone drank it. If there's no mess, then the later Here are some common causes of large beer stealing trub beds....


2

Yes and yes. Finings will generate trub, and you might want to rack the beer off it before packaging. Finings also do not remove much if any of the yeast so priming will not be a problem at all whatsoever. I've been bottling and using finings for many years and never had any problems with carbonation.


2

The esters which provide the banana aroma are only formed at the start of the fermentation, when the yeast grows and multiplies. And indeed underpitching is part of this. However, after your first beer, the yeast has multiplied, and so if you would or had pitched your new beer on this yeast cake, no more (or much less) banana esters would have been formed. ...


2

I'm reasonably certain its beer ;) Even a pale ale looks dark in a carboy when it clears. Your yeast is settling to the bottom and in that process the beer at the top is clearing. But this beer is having trouble clearing. That looks like a lot of sediment for a secondary on a pale ale, to me. My recommendation would be to crash cool it. That will help ...


1

Judging by the light creamy color of your yeast/trub layer, it looks like you harvested very clean yeast, with very little trub mixed in. I'm not sure where that creamy foaming comes from, as you said probably from the carbonation. I've had harvested and stored Belgian yeast starting to float when removing from the fridge within 5-10 minutes, and even ...


1

There are no doubt yeast cells throughout it, but if you're going to pitch from that, you should use the topmost white stuff below the liquid. All of the slurry below the liquid should be fine, but you'll have a little more trub settled down at the bottom. And since you'll only need to pitch a bit of this in the next batch (assuming you're not jumping up ...


1

For a quick answer for a homebrew definition of "Bottle Conditioning". No Not without a lot of extra work and or using gimmick devices. Bottle Conditioning in homebrew generally means to allow suspended yeast after fermintation to carbonate the beer to a desired c02 volume by feeding it a small amount of fermentable sugar, usually 4oz Corn Sugar for a ...


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