13

Saving yeast is easier than some make it out to be. When you xfer the beer to package it (or to a secondary) simply leave a little beer behind in the fermenter. Use that beer to swirl up the slurry in the fermenter and pour it into 2 sanitized containers. Store those in the fridge. Each container should enough yeast to ferment an average batch of beer. ...


8

we can get away with re-using yeast, because Mutation isn't instantaneous, it take multiple generations to change a whole batches properties. Also bigger brewers use a "mother culture" to grow more yeast, like making a starters from the same beginning yeast over and over. In my own experience, i have used the same yeast batch for 3-4 times with no changes ...


7

How did Monks and farmers do it? Farmers in Norway apparently do it with even less fanfare. http://www.garshol.priv.no/blog/342.html Terje took some wort in a plastic bucket. Then he brought out a plastic box of pale gray flakes. This was the kveik, which Terje got from a friend in Hornindal twenty years ago, and has been using since. Terje collects the ...


7

Yeast follow the laws of natural selection. As a cell is budding the new mass may have some minor defects / mutations. If those changes give the yeast an advantage to survive it will get passed on. You can have noted changes in just a few generations. I've observed in my own washing methods strains becoming less flocculant just because my washing method ...


6

The bottom layer contains more trub, but does also contain yeast. The top layer is formed after the majority of the trub has already settled, so it's more or less pure yeast on top. You don't have too much - actually the opposite. It's best to make a starter - even though it looks like a lot of yeast, it will be vastly underpitched in a 5 gallon brew. I'd ...


6

Yes, I have saved tons of money by growing my own yeast. It just takes a little planning and time. Slants or glycol storage are going to be your best bet. Get a pressure cooker to acts as a makeshift auto-clave for sterilization. With some yeasts coming in at $6-$9 a vial, this will help you get the most out of that money. In fact I have pulled proprietary ...


6

Mostly economical, yes. Another reason is potentially limited (or non-existent) commercial availability of specific strains. Either the yeast company's seasonal strain releases or something cultivated from yeast remaining in the bottle. Another reason is to develop a "house" strain, or to modify the behavior of an existing strain. For instance, the good-...


6

Sure, there's no reason you can't do this. Realistically, though, since you're talking about a beer you've brewed yourself, there are other times in the process where it is much easier to collect yeast. For example, after primary fermentation is done, it is usually pretty easy (depending on your equipment) to collect some of the yeast cake deposited after ...


5

You don't necessarily need to make a starter if you are re-pitching within a few weeks because the viability of the yeast will still be pretty high. But, if you store the yeast for much time you should always make a starter. This ensures that the yeast is still viable and it will help ensure the yeast are active so you don't have a long lag time during ...


5

The short answer is yes, it's the same species of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, so you can do it. The long answer is, you will have a hard time getting it to taste the same as commercially produced nutritional yeast (a.k.a. nooch). Just as there are dozens of different strains of homebrew yeast, selectively bred for different characteristics, there are ...


5

Yes, the current consensus is don't bother rinsing (homebrewers almost never truly wash) the yeast. I have verified this for myself over the course of hundreds of batches. There is no advantage to rinsing the yeast and it's just another point where you could contaminate it. 1.) I have never found the trub to have any effect on the next batch. When I use ...


5

Washing yeast with Starsan will kill most of the yeast. Just like it kills off other microbes in your equipment when you sanitize. All stored yeast should really be used within a few weeks. I prefer to just leave the beer on top of the yeast in a mason jar. Washing is not necessary. I decant the spent beer when I am ready to pitch into a new starter ...


4

A krausen is created mostly from coagulating proteins and high yeast activity. You may still get a krausen at ale temps with the lager yeast due to the level of activity, but in general it's hit and miss how much yeast you get from top cropping, even more so with a bottom fermenting strain. In your shoes, I would divide the smack pack yeast between two ...


4

The honest answer is: There's no black and white answer to this. Reason being that yeast is a living micro-organism, making it very difficult (especially on the homebrewer's scale/budget) to measure these sorts of things. Oh, and also every yeast is different in so many ways, one of which being alcohol tolerance and it's effects on yeast health. I've ...


4

It looks like you streaked several times from the same sample of yeast, and that there was a bit too much liquid in each streak (they resemble puddles). The liquid should be nearly invisible on your when applied to the plate. Also the plate surface should be a bit dry, so liquid is absorbed quickly. The streaking technique is important too: the plate in the ...


4

Just do it Nothing you described is needed or beneficial with modern liquid yeast packages. For example Weast's Activator: The Activator™ package was designed with superior UV light- and oxygen-barrier material to extend shelf life, making our 6 month from manufacture date Product Warranty possible. Yeast slowly depletes energy reserves while in storage. ...


4

'So what exactly is 4 - 6 generations? [...] Are all of those considered generation 2?' A generation of yeast is considered as having gone from pitching to post-fermentation collection. So if you ferment a batch with new yeast and collect five jars, those are all first generation. If you pitched every one of those jars into a new batch and collected five ...


3

This all looks a bit like gobbledygook if you ask me. The intention is not to dry yeast commercially, simply for the home brewer. Norweigien Kveik has been dried at home for centuries, how do you think they dealt with it in the past before UV lights stainless steel chambers, pressurised canisters etc. I would suggest you look at David Heath's Youtube channel ...


3

I assume they're all different re-pitches of the same original strain? Certainly you would want to keep different strains apart so you can pitch based on their desired properties. But even still, I would keep the harvested yeast separate, if only so you can use them in a FIFO order of collection. The method you're using the harvest yeast has a reliable ...


3

The ROT is to not reuse yeast from an OG higher than 1.060. I've succesfully pushed that to 1.073. That assumes a healthy pitchin the first place. I've also taken a bit of slurry from a higher OG and used it o make a new starter. At the OG of your beer, I'd be leery. You should use some to make a starter and carefully assess its health before using it.


3

The primary intent of boiling the water is to kill any bacteria or other critters that may be living in it. If you are confident that the water you buy at the store is of the same purity, then by all means use it. If not, then you should boil the water regardless of source.


3

I think that dumping the yeast is best. However, the yeast collected from blowoff is the best yeast for repitching as it has not been stressed by high alcohol levels. It's very much like top cropping in that regard. With your setup I'd worry about two things: the effect of StarSan on yeast viability, and contaminants that may be in your tap water. If you ...


3

What is a "good" amount of yeast? Did you use a starter/re-pitch? Regardless I've scores of batches with White Labs WLP810 (which should be pretty much the same strain) and conclude it may take patience... When I lost one of my lagering units, I decided to re-visit this yeast. I like the temperature flexibility/tolerance and often fermented at 59-60F. I ...


3

Yes, apparently you can. There's a recipe for it here: http://marmitelover.blogspot.no/2011/04/how-to-make-your-own-marmite.html The author says she uses 'top fermentation from a brewery' - which I imagine is the krausen, although on a homebrew scale I wonder if that gives enough yeast. She also mentions that it doesn't taste like the original - lacking ...


3

You should gelatin fining in a separate vessel than the one primary was in if you want to save the yeast. You are correct in thinking that you do not really want that gelatin mess coming out with the yeast you plan to re pitch. It will coat the yeast and slow their growth and performance the second time around. This is probably on of the few times a ...


3

No, there is no danger in leaving it longer and getting more separation. If anything, it means you get even more yeast, although the amount is only a few percent. If there is a lot of trub, then you may want to pour off the yeast into a different vessel to separate it from the trub. The trub falls quickest, so this will be at the bottom of your jar. Store ...


3

I have two different mashed potato recipes that I love. One includes bacon and steamed shredded cabbage (obviously out of the question here), the other is Stone's IPA garlicky mashed potatos, which calls for 1/4 tsp of brewer's yeast. As a personal suggestion, unless someone has an aversion to the potato skins, I prefer to leave them 100% on for texture ...


3

You'll want to keep the yeast cool (under some beer) or cold (in the fridge after the beer is removed) to minimize autolysis. The warmer it is the faster they run out of glycogen, and once they run out they'll start dying. Dead cells aren't necessarily a problem, as long as your viability hasn't dropped too much. If most of the yeast are alive, then they ...


2

Generally you will have few commercial brewers that will reuse it more than 5 or 6 times with out re-culturing; and re-scaling up a starter. Ignoring mutation it could theoretically last for ever, but we cannot ignore this. For ale yeasts you would ideally top crop at high krausen and repitch within 24/48 hours. For a lager yeast you would bottom cop and ...


2

I don't think there is any danger in the timing, but if your sample contained a lot of trub, having it all settle out with the majority of the yeast defeats the purpose of the wash. If you can see two distinct layers formed in the bottom you likely have a lot of trub in there and I'd suggest agitating things again so you can pour off the yeast while it's ...


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