8 votes

Using Refractometer

They are different but only in the scale the refraction is interpreted. You can get refractometers with various scales. Specific Gravity, brix, plato, ppm/ppt (saline). This is a very good question ...
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6 votes

I forgot to take my first Gravity reading

It isn't too much of a big deal. If you have the nutritional information from the honey you can calculate how much of it was pure sugar (mainly glucose in honey I believe). Then it is a simple case of ...
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4 votes

FG too low to read

Actually this shouldn't be too hard, provided you have an accurate scale. You can simply dissolve some white table sugar in your mead and compare the reading you get with the reading you would expect ...
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4 votes
Accepted

How to check gravity cleanly

I'd pick up a wine thief, dips in and fills from the bottom. Some can even house the hydrometer. Otherwise a turkey baster does the trick. Be sure to clean and sanitize anything that comes in ...
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  • 353
4 votes

Trying to calculate my efficiency correctly

I can see that your post mash and post boil gravities are really off. For example you state an estimated post mash gravity 1.037 after correction, but then have 1.030 post boil. This would only be ...
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4 votes

Trying to calculate my efficiency correctly

Looks like you are doing it right to me, using those calculators. The only thing that might change your actual # is the calibration temp of your hydrometer. Be sure that it is 20C. Some hydrometers ...
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  • 36.2k
3 votes
Accepted

gravity rising, no airlock activity

Well, gravity can't go up...so it sounds like the honey probably wasn't dispersed evenly in the water. I imagine getting caramelized honey to evenly disperse probably takes aeration or an immersion ...
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  • 1,501
3 votes
Accepted

Testing specific gravity before bottling

You won't be introducing that much oxygen by opening the fermentation bucket to simply take a gravity sample, unless you go stirring it up or something.
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  • 10.1k
2 votes

Trying to calculate my efficiency correctly

First, I can't see your images from my work computer so I'll explain it from scratch. Each type of grain (base malt and adjuncts) have a potential yield of sugar. For simplicity's sake, we'll use ...
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  • 1,152
2 votes

Temperature calibration of ºBrix to SG conversion

Conversion from Brix to SG doesn't require temp adjustment. Only the reading you measure needs to be adjusted for temp. Or better yet zero out your refractometer with distilled water that's the same ...
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2 votes

Temperature calibration of ºBrix to SG conversion

Both Brix and specific gravity are temperature sensitive but the conversion seems to be independent of that fact. That is, if you start with the correct value in Brix, your converted SG value will be ...
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  • 1,890
2 votes

Using Refractometer

No. The scales are different. The refractometer works on the principle that when a ray of light crosses a boundary (in this case into a fluid), the material refracts the ray under a certain angle. ...
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  • 3,605
2 votes
Accepted

Original Gravity too high for Saccharometer Scale

The only drawback would be the larger sample size required and that you need very accurate (i.e lab grade) mass and volumetric measurement. Your proposed method is sound, though. A hydrometer ...
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1 vote
Accepted

No pre-fermentation gravity reading

You could try a vinometer. They are meant to measure alcohol in e.g. wine. Personally, I found vinometers rather finicky. When you use one, send your sample through a coffee filter or paper towel ...
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  • 1,216
1 vote

Hydrometer reading - should I discard or reintroduce the sample?

I typically return my sample after taking a reading. If your sanitation is appropriate then you wont have any issues. However, you mention that you rinse with water after sanitizing. I dont believe ...
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1 vote
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Refractometer correction for cider making

I have used the same wort calculators on ciders with some success. True the ingredients are different, but the correction curves should be similar. Personally for beer-wort I use a correction factor ...
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  • 3,317
1 vote

Temperature calibration of ºBrix to SG conversion

I believe the answers from @Evil Zymurgist and @thesquaregroot have missed the point. Nowadays, for brewers at least, the SG of a sample is conventionally reported as its density relative to water at ...
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1 vote

Gravity concerns slow fermentation

Pitching insufficient or partially inactive yeast can cause prolonged fermentation periods. If the brew is still visibly fermenting then let it ferment to completion. I usually wait for at least 10 ...
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1 vote

Using Refractometer

Refractometer are commonly used to measure sugar in grapes before picking them up to make wine, you need less liquid to get a measurement. Less common in homebrewing, but also used, just make sure ...
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  • 4,736
1 vote

What's the average loss of gravity after two days of fermenting?

I don't believe there is a exact formula to calculate this, but I think that 1.052 would take about 4 - 5 days to ferment with US-05, maybe even less in this temperature. Judging by relatively quick ...
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  • 221
1 vote

How to check gravity cleanly

Getting those bucket lids off is a bothersome task. I always use the spigot straight into the test jar. Then I spray the closed spigot with a spray bottle filled with starsan to clean it after I pull ...
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  • 230
1 vote

How to check gravity cleanly

I always use the tap. You really want to minimise the number of times you open up the fermenter as it can lose some of the protective CO2 layer on top and can let wild yeast or other nasties in. ...
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