8

They are different but only in the scale the refraction is interpreted. You can get refractometers with various scales. Specific Gravity, brix, plato, ppm/ppt (saline). This is a very good question because refractometers don't just read sugar. Anything that affects light refraction will affect the reading. This includes water chemistry adjucts! This is ...


6

You are absolutely correct. Unless something is dissolved into the liquid, or there's so much trub that the hydrometer is sitting on top of it, the reading will be unaffected.


5

It isn't too much of a big deal. If you have the nutritional information from the honey you can calculate how much of it was pure sugar (mainly glucose in honey I believe). Then it is a simple case of using an online calculator to to calculate an estimated SG for your recipe. If precision means slightly less you could simply use the preloaded 'honey' option ...


5

Bottom line: its impossible for the gravity to decrease during boil. You only evaporate water, leaving an increasingly sugary solution. So there is an error with your preboil postboil or both gravity readings. Most common reasons for incorrect readings: Incomplete Mixings Failure to to a temperature adjustment Related to the second - Uncalibrated ...


4

I'd pick up a wine thief, dips in and fills from the bottom. Some can even house the hydrometer. Otherwise a turkey baster does the trick. Be sure to clean and sanitize anything that comes in contact with your wort though.


4

I can see that your post mash and post boil gravities are really off. For example you state an estimated post mash gravity 1.037 after correction, but then have 1.030 post boil. This would only be possible if you diluted with water. Post boil will always be higher from the boil off evaporation. In any case, I think the hydrometer calculator is setting you ...


4

Actually this shouldn't be too hard, provided you have an accurate scale. You can simply dissolve some white table sugar in your mead and compare the reading you get with the reading you would expect to get if you had dissolved the same amount of sugar in water instead. The difference will tell you how far below SG 1.000 (density of water) you are. For ...


4

Looks like you are doing it right to me, using those calculators. The only thing that might change your actual # is the calibration temp of your hydrometer. Be sure that it is 20C. Some hydrometers are closer to 15 or 18C, depends on the manufacturer. Although that won't change your OG much. 67% mash efficiency does seem like a normal for BIAB. If the ...


3

I guess you're assuming the sample will continue to ferment with suspended yeast? There's quite a few reasons why this can fail: the sample may not be at the same temperature as the beer (both due to it's location plus it lacks the exothermic heat produced from the large volume of yeast in the main ferment.) the sample may become contaminated and ferment ...


3

If the trub is actually physically holding the hydrometer up, preventing it from moving down, then unambiguously: yes, the trub will render your hydrometer reading useless. If, on the other hand, the trub is suspended in the liquid, it is a mixed bag. Suspended solids will impact a hydrometer reading, but for brewers it is usually very minimal. The only ...


3

You won't be introducing that much oxygen by opening the fermentation bucket to simply take a gravity sample, unless you go stirring it up or something.


2

No. The scales are different. The refractometer works on the principle that when a ray of light crosses a boundary (in this case into a fluid), the material refracts the ray under a certain angle. This is expressed as a number called the refractive index. This index changes depending upon the material. The refractive index of salt water is different from ...


2

First, I can't see your images from my work computer so I'll explain it from scratch. Each type of grain (base malt and adjuncts) have a potential yield of sugar. For simplicity's sake, we'll use the "point system" (that is Specific Gravity minus 1 times 1000), so for a Specific Gravity of, say, 1.040, we would say that you have 40 point (1.040-1 = .040, ....


2

Conversion from Brix to SG doesn't require temp adjustment. Only the reading you measure needs to be adjusted for temp. Or better yet zero out your refractometer with distilled water that's the same temp as your wort. Do this easily by letting both the wort and distilled water sit at room temp until even, then calibrate, then take reading. Edit: SG scale ...


2

Both Brix and specific gravity are temperature sensitive but the conversion seems to be independent of that fact. That is, if you start with the correct value in Brix, your converted SG value will be correct. So you will want to make sure that your Brix value is temperature adjusted before you do the conversion. From what I've heard, refractometers ...


1

I have used the same wort calculators on ciders with some success. True the ingredients are different, but the correction curves should be similar. Personally for beer-wort I use a correction factor of 0.99 for my refractometer, and 1.04 for cider... but your mileage may vary. You might even find the opposite is true for your refractometer. Each gauge ...


1

I believe the answers from @Evil Zymurgist and @thesquaregroot have missed the point. Nowadays, for brewers at least, the SG of a sample is conventionally reported as its density relative to water at 20 degrees Centigrade. If the standard was defined at a different temperature then the specific gravity value would most likely be different since the thermal ...


1

Pitching insufficient or partially inactive yeast can cause prolonged fermentation periods. If the brew is still visibly fermenting then let it ferment to completion. I usually wait for at least 10 days before testing the SG of the brew to determine if it has completed and often wait for at least 14 days before attempting to keg or bottle.


1

Refractometer are commonly used to measure sugar in grapes before picking them up to make wine, you need less liquid to get a measurement. Less common in homebrewing, but also used, just make sure it has the right scale, but you can convert the value from Plato or Brix scale to SG as well. Other scales? Maybe not... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


1

I don't believe there is a exact formula to calculate this, but I think that 1.052 would take about 4 - 5 days to ferment with US-05, maybe even less in this temperature. Judging by relatively quick airlock action, I would assume the yeast is in good health. Also, it is worth mentioning that the fermentation is fastest in the beginning, just after the yeast ...


1

Getting those bucket lids off is a bothersome task. I always use the spigot straight into the test jar. Then I spray the closed spigot with a spray bottle filled with starsan to clean it after I pull a sample.


1

I always use the tap. You really want to minimise the number of times you open up the fermenter as it can lose some of the protective CO2 layer on top and can let wild yeast or other nasties in. Dipping things into your beer is another thing you want to minimise to reduce disturbing the beer and the risk of infection. But if you open the tap slowly and ...


1

I'd consider that within a reasonable margin of error. It will hardly affect your beer in a noticeable way. I wouldn't worry about it at all. In any case, that's pre boil. If you just boil a bit longer, you'll have slightly less beer but you'll be able to hit your intended OG. As to why it happened, there are any number of reasons for a minor thing like ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible