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6

Just becasue you don't use secondary doesn't mean you can't rack to a bottling bucket and bottle from that. That's what I do. So, to answer the question directly, the best way to bottle from a primary is to not bottle from a primary!


4

Cold crash to help sediment and compact yeast. Safely tip the carboy 10-15° so you can maximize beer extraction at the end of racking (I use a couple of paperbacks). Do any movement or tipping of your carboy hours before racking so any disturbance can re-settle. Very carefully lower your racking arm down into the sediment bed. Use some sort of spacer so the ...


3

Most of the benefits are achieved the first time. Doing a second fining might increase clarity a little bit more, but the difference might be so little that it is not worth the trouble. Also, if you bottle-condition, you will still end up with yeast in the bottle. Take a look at the pictures of this test: Comparing one beer treated with gelatin and one ...


3

I like the stainless steel racking cane with the orange seal. (Steril Siphon Starter) https://www.morebeer.com/products/sterile-siphon-starter-3-5-6-65-gallon-carboy-smooth-necks.html?site_id=9 What's unique with this cane is You can actually move it to the side of a carboy about 2/3rds down and see what you're doing. The red top is visible in even dark ...


3

Can you use bentonite and Sparkolloid to clarify at the same time? Bentonite first (if you aren't using pectinase) followed a week later by Sparkolloid. You would use one after the other in the same container but not both at the same time. Can they be used in the primary fermentation bucket or must they be used after racking? It can be used in the ...


3

Using hop bags is just for ease of use of hops. Using them in the boil pretty much depends on your system. With my system, the pickup tube will clog if I use whole hops without a bag. For that reason, I almost always use pellets in the kettle. When I use whole hops in the kettle, I increase the amount by 10% to account for the supposed loss of utilization ...


3

I can think of two possible scenarios: The beer has finished fermenting, and you just didn't notice it. If it's relatively warm (say, around 70o F.), a regular strength beer can finishing fermenting in as little a 2 or 3 days. Once the yeast is done consuming sugars, you won't see much activity in the air lock. In general, air-lock activity is a poor ...


3

I guess it depends upon how much haze you are looking for. While most brewers spend their energies trying to remove haze, you could simply leave out all those steps that go towards reducing haze: use water with low hardness (has low colloidal stability) avoid protein rests in the mash to maintain as much protein as possible use a significant portion of ...


2

Low flocculating yeast (like weiss/witbier) should get you the required look. The rest that you mention should work. I have not tried to make a hazy beer, so I can't offer any more assistance.


2

There are many causes of haze in beer. Here you're assuming that the haze is from the yeast, but it may be chill haze, which takes a long time to settle out, if at all. Take a sample of the beer and warm it to room temperature. If the haze disappears then you know it was chill haze.


2

If you put your bottled beer in the refrigerator and let it sit, it usually will be crystal clear within a few weeks, even if it starts out with chill haze. I think the only difference between cold crashing before bottling and cold crashing in the bottle would be the amount of sediment you'll end up with in the bottle. When you crash before bottling, you ...


2

I use Cold Crashing with my 30L fermenter and it has significantly increased my yield whilst reducing sediment in the bottom of each bottle. If you're using a bucket or similar fermenter with a tap then there is minimal risk of disturbing the trub cake during bottling.


2

Interesting product. Its designed to really strip out 90+% of the yeast from a distillers wash solution. Seems like that might be pretty drastic if you planned to bottle condition. It might take longer than normal to carbonate if its really as good as it reports to be for removing yeast. I think just good brewing practices and cold storage is fine for ...


2

Yes you can, both can be done. I usually follow instructions I am provided. I have three books on the subject: The Encyclopedia of Home Winemaking - mentions to add it before yeast. Techniques in Home Winemaking - mentions for best results to add it before, but can also be used after first or second racking, before stabilization. Modern Winemaking - ...


1

I am guessing it’s the tartaric acid has an ion charge that holds it in suspension and that something about the ginger root was the flocculant that bound with it allowed it to drop out.


1

Turbo Clear is a Still Spirits product deliberately designed to drop Still Spirits Turbo Yeast out of a sugar wash. You generally make a sugar wash for spirits distillation - not for beer. I'm not sure if you've seen what Turbo Yeast does to a wash, but it was initially bred for making ethanol fuel. It ferments hard and fast and produces a cloudy / milky ...


1

Just a couple of things. Racking is normally part of the process to get the cider off the yeast so it doesn't taste too yeasty. If you can't find carboy to rack it into, you should bottle it immediately. The second problem you are going to run into is oxidation. Extended storage in a glass carboy with very little headroom is what you want. Like and inch or ...


1

There are a lot of questions/comments in there, so I'll try to address them below. A quick tl;dr though: It will probably clear eventually, but the 5-gallon will probably take longer than the 1-gallons. If you can cold-crash it, it will speed things up. You can try clarifying agents, but they may mess up your plan to bottle carb. I don't know, though, I ...


1

Most finings work in 48 hours along with a cold crash of 34-38°F Super Kleer is a two stage fining product. Meaning two different additions at different times. Assuming it was properly used I would review your beer recipe for adjuncts that do not clairify well. Oats, wheat, citrus oils etc. It's still ok to use gelitan and cold crash to try to fine this ...


1

In my experience, Whirlfloc works better. I used Irish moss for my first couple of years, until I found Whirlfloc. The first time I tried it I was amazed at how clear my wort got. I chill by putting my kettle in a tub of cold water, and the visual effects of a Whirlfloc-treated wort when it hits about 25 degrees C are pretty cool. I've never seen ...


1

You're right - normally you'd store it cold so it can drop clear before packaging. With a wheat beer you don't want or need to do that, or at least not to the same extent. Note that in a wheat beer the haziness comes from both the suspended yeast and the protein in the wheat malt. It takes a long time for the protein to drop out - several weeks, and at ...


1

I don't think its really necessary to store beer before bottling. When the beer is done (another topic all together) its usually ready to go into the packaging phase. If you are observing best practices already with fermentation and the like store it to wait for something mysterious to happen isn't necessary. That said, a week in storage isn't going to ...


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