Hot answers tagged

9

This technique of holding back the extract until the end of the boil is a fairly new concept that's caught on in the last few years. Here's some reasons why its a good idea in general: Faster time from the start of the boil to the 1st hop addition Less chance of a boil over Less caramalization/Mailiard reactions of the extract (leading to lighter colored ...


8

Absolutely not a problem. You will gain just a bit of extra bitterness by boiling longer, but so little that I doubt you could notice it.


8

After 9 days, primary is pretty close to done if not already complete. Yeast activity is starting to slow anyways. The 10° drop to 59° May have caused the yeast to floculate and settle down (cold crash) prematurely. Warm it back up 2° an hour and give the fermentor a gentle swirl to get yeast back into suspension. All in all, you didn't hurt anything. ...


8

This is a type of counter flow chiller. The manufacturer should have some specs on it. Mainly what the heat exchange efficiency is at specific GPMs. For example 100% eff at 1gpm wort and 1gpm coolant. Would mean the wort and coolant exit at the same temperature. All chillers of this type can get 100% efficiency but the flow may have to be so low it's ...


7

No, there is nothing necessarily wrong about using topping off water to cool your wort. But there normally isn't enough topping off water to cool the wort to pitching temperature by itself without applying an additional cooling method (the math is below). One reason to cool quickly to ideal yeast-pitching temp is to allow the yeast to get a nice head start ...


6

Too soon. Don't sweat it. I bet it will lighten up as it ferments and yeast and trub drop.


6

I would get the wort into the fermenter with the yeast and then carefully transport it. Then you don't have to worry about the wort getting contaminated as much due to the airlock on the fermenter. The head space should be able to handle the sloshing from moving it (I am assuming that this is in a car). I would just make sure that it isn't going to go ...


6

You'll be fine, as long as there isn't some obvious source contaminating the snow - like if it's actually falling off of a tree or roof and not coming directly from the clouds. Snow is basically freeze distilled so it's pretty clean. I suppose if it's coming down very hard and several inches of snow fall in there it could it could dilute it a little bit, ...


6

Your hydrometer has been calibrated to give readings at a specific temperature. Depending on the temp when you first read it and the temp after cooling a two point difference is not that surprising. If you look closely at the hydrometer, it will tell you the calibration temperature of your hydrometer. They are normally done somewhere around 60, 65 or 68F. ...


6

The sludge is mostly coagulated proteins, hop residue. A little bit is actually good for your wort, as it provides nutrients for the yeast. Too much might give the beer some slight off flavours. If you were to let the sludge into the fermenter, it wouldn't be the end of the world, but you'll make better beer if your exclude most of it. So, to answer your ...


6

If you are batch sparging the rate has minimal impact of efficiency. If you are fly sparging in most certainly can have an effect, slower is usually better. Finding the balance between a speedy enough brew session and decent efficiency is a personal choice. Shooting for 75% is probably fine and some report getting better beer without pushing into the 80+% ...


6

Your beer will probably be fine. Yes, your arm probably left some bacteria in the wort, but the wort is also picking up a few bacteria from the air. Cooled wort has some bacteria and/or wild yeast. But if those numbers are few compared to the number of yeast cells, then the yeast will start eating, creating an environment less friendly to bacteria. The ...


6

The strategy for getting the most wort into the fermenter is to dump it all in. Everything, hops and everything. I don't scrape the stickies off the wall of the pot, but I tip the whole thing into the fermenter. I generally aim for none wort to be left in the pot. It will make good beer. If you're not comfortable with that, the strainer idea is fantastic ...


6

"This means that the initial metabolism will be aerobic. Aerobic metabolism of sugar yields no alcohol, but still reduces the gravity." Well, actually this isn't true in virtually all fermentation situations involving Saccharomyces yeasts. S. cerevisiae is what is known as Crabtree-positive, i.e. it experiences the Crabtree effect. What this means is that,...


5

I also have had a similar issue. I switched bags from the handmade swiss voile to one I bought at a homebrew shop which had wider mesh. What happened was pretty disturbing. The beer was suddenly full of fine material which was boiling up and creating a very nasty mess on the side of the pot. I cleaned this crap out several times as it built up over the ...


5

I do this about once or twice a year. I'm an all grain brewer, so I typically just brew a batch of base malt. You can do the same with buying some DME/LME and adding that to the right amount of water to get the SG around 1.035-1.040. Your process sounds good, although I would probably blend all the DME and water at once so you can check the SG, and then ...


5

You don't need to stir regularly. Hops, pellet or otherwise, do float around pretty freely. I have never heard of hops sticking to the bottom of the pot, nor has it ever happened to me. I only stir occasionally to get that hop crud of the sides of the pot above the boil line back into the pot. And I stir to manage the foam early on in the process. ...


5

Reboiling will increase bitterness of all the hops that went in 'late' in the kettle. Obviously, as you said you'll lose your aroma charge will decrease in proportion to the length of the reboil. You may likely increase the maillard profile of the malt character depending on how long you boil. The complexity of the original grist will dictate the extent ...


5

Everything I see there looks normal. Green floaties, just hops. Clean surface, no pellicile starting. Some bubbles, c02 still being produced.


5

Although we need more information to be more specific, the general answer to "how much wort should be left behind" is "as little as possible". One thing you can do is pour the wort through a sanitized strainer and press the hops with a sanitized spoon to extract the wort in them. Also, once the wort is cooled down, you can simply pour it through a strainer ...


4

As a professional beer brewing equipment manufacturer,we would like to make a detailed clarification for the device "wort grant" here. The wort grant is generally being installed between the lauter tun and brew kettle. Its position is generally lower than the wort level in the tank, so during lautering, the wort could flow into the wort grant automatically ...


4

I also wants to share my experience with this device (Lauter grant). Actually I am chemical engineer and working in brewery designing company. Advantages of Lauter grant: It acts as buffer tank between lauter tun and wort kettle. It gives positive suction to transfer pump (full flow) Main advantage of later grant is: it avoid choking bed. as it avoid ...


4

Oxygenating your wort using a tank is leaps and bounds more efficient (as well as more expensive) than agitation or splashing. Simply agitating or splashing your wort to oxygenate it will work for most average gravity beers (you're aiming for a minimum of eight parts per million of oxygen minimum), but will otherwise require a significant amount of effort ...


4

I will start by assuming you have an pure O2 tank, regulator, and wand/diffusion stone setup. Because it is impossible for you to over-oxygenate your wort by any method that uses air rather than pure O2. I don't think there is a scientific consensus on how much oxygen is too much, and even measuring oxygen levels is a tricky business. I think there is ...


4

I get the same kraeusen when using liquid yeast - it's not from hydration shock. In fact, the dead yeast that don't survive hydration simply fall to the bottom of the fermentor. The reason for the kraeusen is the constant churning of the wort during active fermentation, which mixes proteins, tannins and hop-alpha acids to create the structure for the ...


4

No need to worry about bottle bombs as long as you let it finish fermenting. With so much sugar, the yeast probably lacked a lot of nutrients it would have otherwise normally gotten from malt, and it may taste a bit 'cidery' or 'champagne-y'. If you had caught it right away I'd probably have recommended adding some extra yeast nutrient to the fermenter to ...


4

Boiling water (or wort in this case) will sanitize the pot and anything in the pot. No need to pre-sanitize. By the way, make sure the pot is clean of any physical matter or the wort will pick up unexpected flavors from it.


4

When you say it got contaminated you mean that some tap water went in contact (mixed) with your wort, right? I wouldn't say that is contamination. IMHO, contamination is that some bacteria has started to grow and eat the nutrients of your wort thus producing some compounds and off-flavours. In this case I wouldn't boil since these compounds are already in ...


4

Diastatic power should not affect alcohol content, if it's enough. If iodine test came out negative, and there is no unconverted starch, you got all the sugars that was possible. Only if diastatic power was too low to fully convert, final amount of simple sugars will be lower. But that would mean starch in your brew, a bad thing on it's own. Mash regime ...


4

Pretty much. Either the strainer will strain the hop material, and clog, as you say, or you can use hop bags or a hop spider to do the filtering. Other methods involve whirlpooling in the kettle to let hop material settle in a cone in the middle of the kettle, then transferring from the side of the kettle, outside of the cone.


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