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7

This will not work with a tea-bag or any other kind of cloth. Unless it's enclosed in a very fine membrane the yeast would easily be able to get through, then disperse and propogate in the main liquid. However, something like this can actually be done. Some homebrewers have taken a high-technology cue from industrial beer and do what's known as an ...


7

Grape skins have wild yeast on them that will, in time, ferment the grape juice. Depending on the particular blend of yeast on your grapes, you may get complete fermentation, or the yeast may have low alcohol tolerance and the fermentation will halt before all the sugars have been consumed. Yeast contribute to the flavour profile of the wine, and ...


7

Interesting. This is the first I've really looked into this. A quick Google search led me to a study by the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health. This study found that fermentations of the following ingredients can sometimes lead to relatively high quantities of methanol in fermented beverages: Bananas, Sugarcane, Agave, Plums ...


7

Agreeing with dmtaylor and the references he quoted, but adding a few foot notes: Saccaromyces Cerevisiae (beer/bread yeast) and S. Bayanus (wine/distilling yeast) are genetically incapable of producing more than minute levels of methanol during fermentation; Certain bacteria are capable of producing significant amounts of methanol, but only under the right ...


6

Depends on batch size. If your doing 2-3 gallons. I would recommend using glass 1 gallon jugs from wine or Apple juice. The cheeseball containers I believe are made from the same foodgrade plastic as 2 liter soda bottles. They are novel in that they have more volume and a large opening for dry hopping. I think either would be a good fermentor untill you ...


6

If you live near a good juice bar or restuarant that serves smoothies, ask the sales clerk if they have any empty glass jugs. Many drinks have an apple juice base and organic apple juice often ships in 1 gallon glass jugs. I've found two shops that happily give the jugs away for free, though I usually buy a smoothie in gratitude. Being a tipping patron ...


6

Make sure you have a healthy yeast in the proper pitch amount. Ferment primary at the cold end of the yeast strains tolerance. A long secondary / aging helps break down fusel alcohols. Yeast needs nutrients and oxygen mainly for their growth phase. This can be substituted by pitching a massive amount of yeast. For example pitching wort on top of a yeast ...


6

Generally speaking "nothing happens" to artificial sweeteners in the initial wine fermentation (eg the first month). I have fermented various beverages with artificial sweeteners and in general the fermentation proceeded as per normal. I have not noticed any real reduction (or increase) in fermentation due to added sweeteners. It can also be said that over ...


5

Honey is aseptic. The water content is too low for microorganisms to develop, so there is no need to pasteurize or use campden. Campden is used in winemaking to eliminate the wild yeasts which exist on grape skins, this helps ensure a more consistent product by eliminating the variation introduced by wild yeasts. None of this is necessary with mead and in ...


5

I think secondary "fermentation" is kind of a misnomer, since fermentation is largely complete by this point. It's more of a secondary "clarification" stage where yeast and other stuff falls out to the vessel bottom. Given this, I think it would certainly be safe to try. All of the alcohol is already in there, acting as a natural preservative. If anything ...


5

IMHO the most discernible difference between beer and wine is the use of grain and grapes/fruit. Beer tends to be grain based - think Reinheitsgebot. However it can be difficult to decide if cider is a beer or a wine - maybe a fruit beer? Carbonation per se seems to be no guide, as champagne is fizzy - more so than most beers. Use of hops seems to be ...


5

FYI I have not made wine before, but I do have a friend at a shop that has. She states to rack after vigorous primary fermentation. from my research, gross lees is the first lees after fermentation. and fine lees is everything that settles after that first racking. http://winemakersacademy.com/gross-vs-fine-lees/ http://winemakersacademy.com/racking-...


5

Gross lees are basically the precipitated fruit/vegetative matter that were mixed with the juice when initially added to the fermenting vessel. Over time this stuff will settle to the bottom of the primary fermenting vessel. The time to rack the wine off the gross lees is when the gross lees have "settled". Settling happens something like one week into ...


5

No don't boil it! Chances are you are fine at this point. Bacteria just don't hang around lonely old clothespins much. Without knowing what type yeast you pitched, I can't give a solid answer, but if you re-pitch using a strong yeast strain like EC1118, it will surely kill any new bacteria that may have been introduced. At a week old about 70-80% of the ...


4

Adding simple sugars like sucrose dextrose increases the alcohol content of the beer, but contribute nothing in the way of body or malt flavour. Beers brewed with a significant amount of these sugars are often described as "cidery", which might be similar to what you're calling "wine like". Next time, try brewing an all-malt kit, i.e. one that does not ...


4

Dry apple cider usually takes several months to a year in the bottle to smooth out. I would not concern myself much with how it tasted at 4 weeks. If you want a sweeter cider that is ready to drink in 4-5 weeks, take a look at my answer in this question: Sweet sparkling cider without pasteurizing, sulphites or lactose Make a "graff" which is a malted ...


4

Using any of those things to filter beer will badly oxidize it and ruin the flavor. I clear beer with time and cold temperature. A couple months at 35F will clear just about any beer. You can also use things like gelatin, Polyclar, or Biofine. If you want to filter you needs kegs and a CO2 setup to push the beer so you can do it in an enclosed manner and ...


4

Yes, is is a problem. After primary fermentation, one of the most important staling agents your homebrew will face is oxygen. Pouring will almost guarantee the introduction of oxygen, whereas siphoning minimizes it.


4

Temperature would be my first bet. You didn't mention what temperature you experienced during your primary fermentation. If your temperature was appropriate for the champagne yeast, then my next bet would be that your OG was not very high; therefore your yeast ate up what little sugar was present in a comparatively short time. Did you augment the bananas ...


4

A cheesy smell usually means you have bacteria in your mash and they have access to oxygen. If this were a sour-mashed beer it would be considered a lost cause at this point. I don't know how this kit is supposed to work, but it's sounds like sanitation is the issue.


4

tl;dr - Yes. It is definitely possible for wine bottles to break or explode, but I've seen many more stories of homebrewers having the corks pop out. I have, however, personally witnessed a commercial "organic," "no sulfites added" wine blow out the bottom of its bottle sitting on the shelf in a grocery store. Most likely, this depends on how secure the ...


4

Your wine should be fine. The alcohol and the acidity should be high enough to kill all the bugs.


4

Recipe: Grape Juice Yeast Making wine is more about process than recipe. With the exception of quality ingredients. Standard table grapes don't really make decent wine. This becomes incredibly apparent when you actually taste the juice from a true wine grape. I've dabbled in some wine making all from kits of different grape musts. When you taste the ...


4

I got a little carried away here, so here's a quick summary. TL;DR: Your yeast was probably either A) nutrient starved, B) Fermenting at too high of a temperature, or C) a combination of both. Regardless of your temperature control situation, I think A (nutrition) is the most likely cuplrit here. While it's true that some yeast strains are more prone to SO2 ...


4

One can wash the grapes to remove "detritus from the field" but it is not really necessary unless the grapes are horribly soiled - and then one might ask why one is making wine from them anyway! But it is possible to wash grapes and if one does it is also a good idea to let them dry as far as is possible to reduce extraneous liquid diluting the must. In ...


4

The problem with much fresh "Supermarket fruit" is that it is usually picked early and is usually unripe. If one can find "ripe" or "over ripe" fruit in a supermarket then IMHO that is the fruit one really wants to use. Unfortunately such fruit has limited shelf life and so is usually difficult to find unless it has been marked down for quick sale. The most ...


4

No, the process is the same. If you sanitize everything correctly, you do not have more chances of spoilage, it will only take more time to rack and bottle. Make sure you have the right size container (carboy or demi-john) to avoid having too much air in the head space. If your carboy is under-filled, instead of topping up with (another) wine, you can also ...


4

According to Daniel Pambianchi, in his book Techniques in Home Winemaking : the wine should not be left for too long on its gross lees to avoid potential spoilage... the gross lees consist mainly of dead yeast cells, and grapes solids. The length of time a wine spends on the gross lees is also dependent on the health of the grapes at crush or harvest. ...


4

First let me say you can pretty much make wine from all grapes, just some of that wine will be better than others. If I had a picture of the leaves, I could probably tell if it's wine grapes or not, but I am guessing that it's just table grapes. I think the easiest way to guess that wine grapes get powdery mildew quite easily and table grapes (bred from ...


4

If you are otherwise happy with the carbonation level of the mead, once it is capped and in the bottle your options are limited. Chilling it before opening, and avoiding agitating it are about your only options.


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