10

This seems like a simple solution dilution problem. Take 5 gallons = 20 quarts => 20 quarts * 5% ABV = 1 quart alcohol. Then take your 1 quart of "80 proof" (40% ABV), and we get 1 quart * 0.4 = 0.4 quarts alcohol So we have a total volume of 21 quarts (beer plus spirits) and a total of 1.4 quarts alcohol, thus 1.4 / 21 = 6.67% ABV Unless I'm ...


9

The starting gravity and ending gravity serve many purposes, but ultimately will only tell you one thing, the percentage of alcohol. Some of the purposes it may serve are: Beer style guidelines Mouthfeel, flavor, bitterness, even aroma (FG) Yeast tolerance (SG) Efficiency of sugar extraction in all-grain brewing (pre-boil gravity) Hop efficiency How much ...


9

If you know the gravity and physical weight of the beer, then you can work out the quantity (volume) like this: V = W / SG where V is the volume in liters W is the weight of the beer in kilos SG is the specific gravity, e.g. 1.040 For this to be accurate, you have to be weighing just beer - the trub and yeast should not be present. US Gallon = 3785ml ...


8

There is brauhaus - a javascript library for homebrew beer calculations, both in the browser and on the server I have not used it - the homepage says features include: Support for multiple Javascript runtimes Node.js 0.6.x, 0.8.x, 0.10.x Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer 9+, Safari, Opera, etc Calculate estimated OG, FG, IBU, ABV, SRM color, ...


7

Your general understanding is pretty much spot-on. I think the thing to consider here is that your reasoning assumes that half or a third of the priming sugar is meant to yield the same amount of carbonation as it would in the bottle. I'd argue this isn't the case. Notice how recommendations like this keg-underpriming 'common wisdom' usually don't go so far ...


6

Specific gravity measures density, which is mass/volume. If you measured the total mass of your system (3000g + 300g) you would have gotten 3300 grams, but the volume is not 3000 ml because you added the DME and it increases the volume of the solution. If the volume increased by 174 ml you would get 3300/3174 = 1.040 for the density. In other words, the ...


5

The easiest way to determine the effect of starter gravity is to decant the starter so the amount is negligible. In addition, I've found that it makes better beer.


5

If the starter fully fermented, most of the 1.040 should be gone; normal yeast attenuation is around 75%, so you should have 1L of 1.010 beer in the starter vessel. 1L of 1.010 beer into 19L of 1.076 OG wort would reduce the OG down to about 1.073. (76 points * 19L + 10 points * 1L) / 20L = 72.7 points = 1.073. Though if possible, you should try to cold-...


5

There is an efficiency difference - while a lot of the starch in caramel malts have been converted, there is still some remaining that can be extracted in a mash, but not in a steep. Also, the mash is typically done for longer than a steep, plus a sparge, which extracts more sugars from the grain. 30% extraction for a steep seems on the low side - but let's ...


3

I don't think you can calculate this number. They report a max extract using a standardized lab test obviously. But then the rest is subject to too many variables for there actually be something to calculate. Its system and brewer dependent on what the ppg will be. I think your calcs are spot on as far as getting in the ball park. Maybe assume a 5-8% ...


3

I too was curious about this the other day. Turns out for five gallons/18.9 L of 1.060 wort at 75% apparent attenuation, 449.1 L/ 15.86 cubic feet/ 118.64 gal of CO2 is produced (standard temperature and pressure. This amounts to 0.88 kg/ 1.94 lb of CO2! I have a few charts for different gravities and apparent attenuations at my blog post about it. I ...


3

You can calculate ABV using the below equation: ABV = (OG - FG) * 131 So, with the use of some Algebra, you can calculate FG using the below equation: FG = -1*(ABV/131 - OG)


3

There was a discussion on HBT about this. If you measure in Fahrenheit, the formula is as follows: C = ((1.313454 - (0.132674*F) + (0.00205779 * F^2) - (0.000002627634 * F^2))) Where C is the correction, and F is degrees Fahrenheit of the liquid being measured with the hydrometer. This assumes the hydrometer is calibrated for 59 degrees Fahrenheit. If ...


3

Usual practice is to test the source water, then determine what needs to be added. There are two calculators for additions in the form of Excel file, one from John Palmer (howtobrew.com), another from Braukaiser. I prefer the latter one. Testing-wise, I'd say that for homebrewing just water report from your local water provider is enough. Some pet shops and ...


3

Quick but not very helpful answer, I am pretty sure there is some sort of equation that can be used for this I am not sure where I have seen it. I am going to do some digging through some book and the interwebs for you and will update here if/when I find it. Found it, it assumes T is in C. SG(true) = SG(indicated) x [ 1.0 - 0.00025[ T(actual) - T(...


2

Average it! First convert your values to Plato as SG isn’t linear for mass of sugar in a volume vs gravity points. This allows you to use simple algebra to average different beers. If the two gravities are very close then not converting will mean you will be off by only a few points, but if the gravities are vastly different your calculated value will be off ...


2

I use Brewtarget. It's a java open source utility that does all you need for brewing beer, including equipment calculations, mash/ sparge temps, estimates pre boil, post boil and finishing volumes and gravity, IBU, SRM and has some nice recipe and brewday instruction printouts.


2

Brewtarget, Open source software, allows you to create, scale, and add notes to recipes, ingredients ..etc you can use it on mac windows and linux, or if you want build from source on your solaris machine. For me I sync the Database on several machines using Dropbox, but you can use almost any file sharing service to keep your changes synced up on ...


2

Just going to throw this in a well. I agree perceived is hard to really calculate from person to person. It is simply that the more non-fermentable dextrines that are in your wort, the perceived bitterness will be lower. 80IBUs suddenly tastes like 20-30IBUs. Same goes for the other side, if the beer is dry and hoppy. 80IBUs may seem like 110IBUs. This ...


2

There is no calculation for sweetness. There are no sweetness units. Whenever I have seen this type of "grading" that you describe sweetness is just some sort of arbitrary lack of bitterness. But there is no reciprocal type calculation. Taking it a step further how do you calculate something that has the qualifier "perceived" in the title. Perceived ...


2

Yes, it's a simple calculation: ABV = (OG - FG) * 131 For example: ABV = (1.055 - 1.012) * 131 ABV = (0.043) * 131 = 5.633% So to reverse it, FG = (131 * OG - ABV) / 131 For example: FG = (131*1.055 - 5.633) / 131 FG = (138.205 - 5.633) / 131 = 1.012 I have seen 129 used as the scaling factor as well, which would drop the ABV to 5.547%, but for ...


2

There's so called Balling formula to calculate "accurate enough" amounts of alcohol, CO2 and yeast mass produced during fermentation. This formula is used in all EU countries to calculate excise duty: 2.0665 gms extract in wort make 1 gm of alcohol, 0.9565 gm CO2 and 0.11 gm yeast mass Calculate weight of extract that has been consumed by yeast then ...


2

One person has measured CO2 production and found that he got 25 gal. of CO2 for one gal. of 1.060 beer. Another person who has measured it has written "Looking at the ratio of alcohol and CO2 atomic weights in the fermentatin equation suggests that for every pound of alcohol you should get 1.045 lbs of CO2. The above brew (in the example he was writing ...


2

Their are 3 ways to do do this that will yield good results: Cold brew the tea and add it to primary or secondary Add the Rooibos during flame-out Add the Rooibos to the boil We highly suggest the first method, as this will preserve most of the distinct aroma and flavor you mentioned. If brewing a 5 gallon batch of beer, we suggest the addition of 1/2 ...


2

I had to look up where you got the 1.046 value from. It seems it's common knowledge that "one pound of sugar dissolved in one gallon of water" yields a solution with a specific gravity of 1.046. However, that's not exactly correct. It is one gallon of a solution of one pound of sugar in water that has a SG of 1.046. The distinction is that the mass ...


2

My answer will not be full, but there are some things I can tell: Splitting half a dollar worth yeast packet in five? Why?! Especially in double-difficult brew, as it is both pretty high gravity (has to be for 10% ABV), and it is mead (no nutrient found in wort) Nutrient. Why add it in parts? I always understood we want yeast to multiply over as short ...


2

OG = Original Gravity SG = Specific Gravity FG = Final / Terminal Gravity OG is usually just in reference to a pre fermentation starting gravity, but can be labled OG for any formula that uses a before and after gravity. OG for ABV calculations can be taken at any point once concentration or dilution has been done post boil. It's actually most accurate ...


2

We make a lot of meads and I think the majority of your process looks pretty good. (Including the staggered nutrient additions). You might want to consider using a blend of nutrients like DAP and Fermaid K. They both contribute different vital compounds. I suspect that the hop additions pre ferment didn't help you much. That yeast is not very hop ...


2

On the Experimental Brewing podcast, we did a test to see how close the IBUs you actually get are to what software predicts (hint:off by as much as +/- 40%). https://www.experimentalbrew.com/podcast/episode-32-ibu-lie As part of it, we interviewed Glenn Tinseth. We were shocked to have him tell us that he never tested pellets, and if you use pellets and ...


2

If I understand correctly, given your recipe you cannot measure original gravity (because you added more sugars in the form of honey after fermentation began) and therefore you need to find a way to estimate original gravity. You will (eventually) measure final gravity and use a calculator to estimate ABV. I would estimate the original gravity contribution ...


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