4 votes
Accepted

When to oxygenate when you delay pitching the yeast?

I would oxygenate (pure O2) right before or after the pitch. Just because the process has the chance to introduce bacteria or wild yeast and it's best if the yeast is there to become dominate ...
user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Lallemand says their dry yeast does not require aerated wort. Should I aerate anyway?

Honestly, this looks like a cut and paste and propbably doesn't differ much from thier other species of yeast that may benifiet from hard growth conditions. Yeast needs oxygen for healthy growth. ...
user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

GCB Materials on Cold Wort Aeration

'Wouldn't the relatively cool temperature of the wort actually increase the solubility of the oxygen, and so reduce the need for vigorous mixing?' For sure. Looking at those revision notes, I think ...
user avatar
2 votes

Hooking a Tetra 77848 to an air stone

I wasn't able to find a good spec sheet for that pump, but a comment somewhere said the outlet is 1/8" (and that is typical), so 1/4" tubing is quite a bit larger than you want. When aerating wort, ...
user avatar
  • 3,030
2 votes

Lallemand says their dry yeast does not require aerated wort. Should I aerate anyway?

It's important to note that they specifically say aeration is only unnecessary for 'first use'. This is very common for active dry yeasts, the reason being that most are grown under 'oxidative' ...
user avatar
2 votes

Lallemand says their dry yeast does not require aerated wort. Should I aerate anyway?

There is almost never a need to aerate/oxygenate with dry yeast. The purpose if aeration is that the O2 is used by the yeast to synthesize sterols. Those keep the cell walls flexible to encourage ...
user avatar
  • 33.3k
1 vote

Is aerobic fermentation in beer brewing a myth?

1) Does aerobic fermentation has a place in this? If so, when and how, and where does the oxygen come from? Aerobic metabolism is a more efficient pathway to convert the glucose to cellular energy ...
user avatar
  • 328
1 vote

Pitching/aerating stacked batches

I don't think there's any need to aerate the subsequent batches. Think about the purpose of aeration...the yeast use the oxygen to synthesize sterols which keep cell walls flexible for budding. But ...
user avatar
  • 33.3k
1 vote

Pitching/aerating stacked batches

Aeration/oxygenation is key. Without it yeast cannot grow successfully, which is basically the whole idea of batch fermentation (read: brewing). So, as you suspect, you really do need to do it. The ...
user avatar
1 vote

Best time to transport wort in a car

I've conducted the mash and boil in one place and transported prior to fermentation in the past, with no issue. Yes, the drive will aerate some...but you will certainly need to aerate more prior to ...
user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Best time to transport wort in a car

I don't think there is a "better" here. Certainly the drive will help aerate, but I wouldn't rely on it. Shake the fermenter well before pitching.  On the other hand, jostling the already pitched ...
user avatar
  • 982
1 vote
Accepted

Aerating no chill corny keg fermentors that don't seal

I just realized that after fermentation is done, I will need at least an extra keg to transfer my beer out of the fermentors, anyway. My batches are of 3 kegs. So I will need to take an 4º keg to ...
user avatar
  • 1,012
1 vote

Aerating no chill corny keg fermentors that don't seal

I think you could skip the CO2 & shaking in step 2: The bike pump should be able to make more than enough pressure to seat the seals, especially if they are well lubricated. The only question is ...
user avatar
  • 3,030
1 vote

Aerating wort with an air pump. What's the proper gallon rating?

Last time I heard someone tried to use an aquarium pump and a 2 micron stone it was a failure: the pump wasn't powerful enough. With a proper pump 30 min is said to be enough. However, there was ...
user avatar
1 vote

What are the primary causes of Acetaldehyde?

The other contributor to Acetaldehyde in beer is excessive aging on yeast. As the yeast cells stress, and eventually die, they can lyse (burst) and release AA from the cell interior into the beer. ...
user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible