7

A ginger bug is simply a lactic acid culture started from raw ginger root (with skin still on) and sugar mixed together in dechlorinated water. When you "add the ginger bug" to your drink recipe, you're adding the liquid from this culture after straining out the chopped ginger bits. After the ginger bug has been allowed to mature to a slightly fizzy state (...


6

I have ordered some Saccharomyces boulardii and plan to do a test brew this weekend. Going to do 5l/1gallon brew with only pale malt ~1040 OG. Will add a small amount of Perle or saaz depending what is in the freezer. I will report back in a week or 2, with the recipe and results. Reporting back... [21 Mar 2016] Apologies it has been a while, I got it ...


5

Sound like its just not done yet. Wild yeast will work slower than some purer strains will work. If there is pressure under the cap when you open it then there is some activity going. Of course, if there wasn't enough sugar then maybe you've just got enough CO2 in the headspace. I think more time will be needed. The notion that the liquid only absorbs ...


4

First, technically all beer is infected, since you pitch yeast. To be pedantic, what you're talking about is contamination. And yes, I'd say pretty much all homebrew (and even commercial beer) is contaminated to some extent. The type and severity of the contamination can vary, however.


3

There's a good article about the ginger beer plant (which I think is your ginger bug) on this website. http://www.themadfermentationist.com/2008/07/ginger-beer-plant-101.html.


3

Ok, so I went and tried it. Maybe I didn't let the soursop get ripe enough or it didn't get the yeasts, or whatever but after a week and a half in the fridge and no evidence of fermentation I gave up on the wild aspect and cultured it with a few tablespoons of the local fermented rice dish, tape hitam (basically red yeast rice mash). This started the ...


3

I have some experience brewing with s. boulardii. I started by making a mead with it, one gallon at a time. I found fermentation was starting very slowly at first and I was concerned that contaminent microbes were taking dominance. It turns out my city water needs to be boiled for at-least half an hour to eliminate the chloramines enough for brewing. Having ...


2

At this point, I have made many one gallon batches of beer, cider and mead using S.Boulardii as my yeast. Cider is by far the easiest. Simply empty a capsule of Florastor or Boulardii Max into a jug of preservative free pure apple juice then stick on your air-lock. If you really want to be cheap and not get a bubbler, you can just put some aluminum foil over ...


2

Ginger Bugs can provide very sharp amounts of ginger flavor depending on the quality and quantity of ginger used in the ginger bug. It is a fun, easy, inexpensive and surprisingly versatile ferment that I encourage noobs to master first. Then also do the GingerBeerPlant (GBP) grains when you can find a source of GBP. GBP grains are very similar to water ...


2

Your Mold or fermentation is not touching the edge of the carboy due I would imagine to the dished bottom or side form of the carboy, which is forming the interesting looking krausen. Looks like yeast is getting started. I would always pitch a packet of yeast along side wide fermentors, but I am paranoid. Good pictures btw.


2

I suspect that the source of the infection was glycerin I used, since I perhaps erroneously assumed it should be sterile from a previously unopened container. I found citations that Sporobolomyces in particular had been isolated from "technical glycerin". Will now run my glycerin supply through the pressure cooker "autoclave". (My wife, trained as a ...


2

It just needs more time. Give it about 6 weeks, that should help. Carbonation can take longer than you might have heard, and longer than you might think. Keep it warm, don't chill it until you are ready to drink. I agree with brewchez on that.


2

YES. All biological contaminations (infections) take time to do thier thing. So yes there are levels to an infection. Acetobactor for example, can be at a range of non detectable to the palet to full on vinegar.


2

Get that vinegar out of there. Your entire batch could turn to vinegar, as it is obviously not a good sanitizer for acetobacter vinegar-producing bacteria! I use vodka in mine, and Everclear would work even better. What you see on top is just foam from initial pouring of the yeast or juice into the fermenter and/or off-gassing from same. That is not what ...


2

There are two steps needed here: Ensure complete fermentation Reduce the amount of yeast in suspension. If you are concerned that the fermentation is not complete, you could raise the temperature of the cider to around 20C, and/or gently swirl the yeast back up into suspension. This will promote more rapid yeast activity, without being so high as to cause ...


1

It is absolutely normal to have a vigorous fermentation for a few days and have it slow down afterwards. The activity of the airlock is by no means a reliable information to know when the fermentation is completed. You really should get an hydrometer (fairly cheap) and measure residual sugar content (gravity). An hydrometer will at least tell you if the ...


1

Looks like a standard beginning fermentation. I wouldn't worry yet. Give it time, it will likely turn out alright.


1

If you have a beginning gravity and an end gravity, it's pretty easy to figure an approximate ABV for your beverage. The only way to definitively tell how much alcohol is in a solution is to run it through a Ebulliometer, which is essentially a tiny alcohol still. Sorry, that's the only real ways to do it!


1

In principle, yes, in the sense that any rogue outside yeast or bacteria could take over your sourdough. However, in what you described, I wouldn't worry about potential cells that have become airborne. They would not only have to find their way to your starter, but then take hold and out compete what you've got going in your starter. By the way, if you ...


1

Traditionally the wort is put in a cold ship over night to inoculate . This is a large shallow vat to maximize air exposure for spontanuous fermintation. Once wort is inoculated the growth phase happens pretty fast, and the brewer is happy. I don't know of any method outside of a lab to test if there is X many yeast cells in Y volume of air. Most of these ...


1

Yeast strains can go to 20+% ABV, but it all depends on the strain. I had a 14% yeast ferment a beer to ~22%! The only way to identify the strain is to send it a lab (unless you have the tools and knowledge). The problem with wild yeast is that you will have many strains, not just one. Bacteria will also be present.


1

Natural yeasts like natural temps :p I would recommend ale fermentation temps, somewhere between 16 C and 20 C. You can go higher, but that will give you higher alcohols. Going colder will probably make the yeast go to sleep.


1

Another option would be to put the wood into a steamer and kill any wild yeasts/bacteria/molds using steam. No yeast naturally lives in wood unless the wood has been used previously for brewing/cidermaking/winemaking. All you need to worry about is the surface nasties. If you don't have a steamer, you can simply put a colander over a pot with a small ...


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