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4

Just do it Nothing you described is needed or beneficial with modern liquid yeast packages. For example Weast's Activator: The Activator™ package was designed with superior UV light- and oxygen-barrier material to extend shelf life, making our 6 month from manufacture date Product Warranty possible. Yeast slowly depletes energy reserves while in storage. ...


4

That sounds like a plan. When the starter is cool the yeast will sediment quicker so you can pour off the spent wort easier. Definitely take yeast out of the fridge on brewday, let it warm. If you have some additional sterile wort, then you can decant the spent wort and pitch the fresh wort as soon as the yeast has come up to room temp. Otherwise, if you ...


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Sounds like you got a good wild yeast. By all means try to capture it. Pitching your yeast should insure it becomes dominate on further batches. Not going to detail everything here but some items to look up for DIY. Yeast washing Yeast slants Yeast starters Long term yeast storage In short I would take a small portion of the trub and grow more for future ...


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Most dry yeast packs are intended for 5 gallons at 1.040 SG. You need to basically add a pack for each .020 points above 1.040 SG x volume / 5g In your case I would just grow more yeast with a starter. How big of one depends on: Yeast Package date, wort SG, and volume. All are critical to calc the proper pitch. For example you need about 280b cells for ...


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Traditionally cider is made without pitching additional yeast. There is plenty of wild yeast on the apple skin. In fact apple skin is such a reliable source of wild yeast that it's often used for making a sour-dough starter. Unless you've taken steps to kill the wild yeast that's what the foam is and that is what will ferment your cider.


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It's certainly possible - a starter is only fermented to completion, but not conditioned, so byproducts of fermentation, such as acetaldehyde (green apple) and acetolactate (which becomes diacetyl - butter/butterscotch) are still left in the beer. This have low taste thresholds (50ppb for diacetyl), so it doesn't take much for you to notice then. In a ...


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Turns out that, at least in my case, freezing the dry yeast is actually a bad idea. I made an experiment last night and I put two sachets of ICV D-47 in the freezer and two sachets in the fridge. This morning I took both of them out and let them warm up in the room. I used the same activating mixture I've always used (some must + some nutrients) and split ...


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There are two main types of pressure barrels, which are broadly described as top tap or bottom tap, depending where the tap is on the barrel. If the tap is at the top of the barrel then pressure is required inside the keg to push the beer up a tube and out of the tap. In the case of bottom taps, there is no need for pressure to dispense beer, but if there ...


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The "scientific" way would be to use a microscope and hemacytometer to count cells. The empirical method is what I use and has worked well for me for several hundred batches. You make a guess! I use between 1/3-1/2 of a previous slurry if I'm going to direct pitch the slurry. I use between 2 TBSP. -1/4 cup if I'm going to make a new starter from slurry.


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Have you taken a gravity reading? I've had starters that have very little apparent activity that are fermenting right along. It can be tricky to take a gravity sample for a low-volume starter, but with 3L you should have enough to work with to solve this problem w/o overly reducing your cell count. Also, is the starter on a stir-plate, shaken periodically or ...


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This is a very broad question but here's some direction: ...and the usefulness of this answer depends on whether you are planning on starting a long term barrel project or a medium term sour beer or a very quick sour batch... Something is growing, but it is certainly changing the ratios of different critters. My thinking would be to split the starter up ...


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That is probably fine and will start the fermentation faster. I do that all the time in homebrewing beer (with store-bought yeast, though). The concern is in homebrewing that the yeast degenerates after a few cycles, and then starts producing off-flavors. But if you still leave it open for wild fermentation, that's probably not an issue anyway.


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Could be a yeast or could be lactobacilius - or both! Either way its going now and the only way to stop it is to pasteurise it. I would tend to let it go. As has been said, cider was traditionally made by crushing the juice and storing it in a vat to ferment naturally over some time. No yeast was ever bought or added. In the majority of cases the cider ...


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Although I have no experience with Lactobacillus, I think part of the answer is in the Brewer's Notes. Some strains of Lactobacillus work better at much lower temperatures... Lacto pitch rate is important... I believe since this recipe has 2 yeast strains, the pitch rate is more critical than when you have only one. So if you don't have the stir plate, ...


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You need about 13,500 billion cells for 375 gallons of 1.050 wort. Thats about 750 grams of dry yeast. To propagate 100g to your pitch rate you can do a single 50 gallon starter. Which will cause a 3-4 fold growth resulting in trub with cell equivalents to 800-1600 grams of dry yeast.


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This is what is called a "kettle sour", because you're souring it in your boil kettle, then reboiling. This gives pretty precise control over how much you sour it. This IMO, is the main reason for the specifics on the starter. You're leaving it in there for a short period of time, and you need a good yeast count for it to get the job done. The author of ...


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Your are correct in your assumption that the old yeast cake will act exactly like a sourdough starter. If it is smelling good, I would immediately pitch a new batch of elder-flower must straight onto the yeast cake and make some more.


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I have never contacted a facility to do this for me, but have in the past purchased drinks, or tablets/capsules that have the probiotic organism I am interested in and grown up cultures from them and then used these to make a starter. I have not done it in the most scientific way. Saying that if you were to get the sample, mix it into solution then plate it ...


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