6

Yeah you can scale it down as much as you want . Stove top brews are very easy to manage. The only thing to keep in mind is your efficiency, on a stove top and with a smaller amount of water it can be difficult to perfectly manage your mash temp, because smaller volumes respond more quickly to heat. But with a good thermometer with an alarm (10$ digital meat ...


6

This has been done before. Essentially you are brewing a high gravity wort and diluting it. I understand some large breweries do the same. This article from More Beer has some thoughts on it. They recommend no more than a 30-40% dilution - not 100%


5

It's impossible to look at a beers ingredient list and derive an exact recipe from it. You have to go through a process of trial and error, using any information you can get from the manufacturer combined with experience or intuition. However, the good news is that you probably won't have to do that yourself, because its highly likely someone else already ...


5

High gravity brewing is a technique used by the giant macro brewers of adjunct american lager. They'll brew a high gravity wort, and add water in the fermenters. I first heard this from Mitch Steele of Stone at the time, who had worked for Anheuser-Busch making Budweiser. His interview on Brewing Network The Session from 11-05-2006 described the way they ...


5

Dry yeast packets are generally enough for 3-6 gallons. So with 1 gallon, about 1/4 of one pack is plenty for a commercial dried yeast such as Danstar Lallemand Nottingham Ale yeast. And you most definitely would not need 2 packs! Even 1 whole pack is a major over-pitch.


4

Yes you can do that. I'm a newbie too and have been doing this myself, because I can only boil enough for a 10L brew. A couple of bits of advice I would offer are firstly that the dried yeast packs have enough yeast to do 20+ L, so you'll end up with lots of half packets, which keep ok in a ziplock bag the fridge, and secondly don't push the envelope with ...


4

This is something that is commonly done, and I have done it myself many times. A lot of extract recipes call for a partial boil with water added to make the final volume. The main thing you need to take into account is your hop utilization. Boiling them in the highly concentrated wort will decrease the solubility, so you will need to add more than double the ...


4

No, the process is the same. If you sanitize everything correctly, you do not have more chances of spoilage, it will only take more time to rack and bottle. Make sure you have the right size container (carboy or demi-john) to avoid having too much air in the head space. If your carboy is under-filled, instead of topping up with (another) wine, you can also ...


4

You can scale malt, hops and volumes linearly. While in principle hops don't scale linearly, it's almost linear, and depends upon your kettle geometry. It's not enough of a difference to worry about - the difference is less than the error introduced due to measuring your hops to the nearest 0.1g. Evaporation is also due to kettle geometry, although this ...


4

I use Brewtarget, which has a scale feature, which works up or down. I use to scale down 5 gal batches down to 1 gal. It is also open source(free), and works on linux or Windows.....I have both and use drop box to sync the databases.


3

Nope, at this level everything scales pretty linearly; double up!


3

In your position, I'd just brew it, and see how you like the outcome. Many factors affect perception of bitterness - it's far from an exact science. For instance, if the recipe has been stored for any length of time at room temperature, the hop alpha acids in some hop varieties will have deteriorated up to 50% in 6 months. But let's look at the theory all ...


2

You want the fraction that you add to have the same OG as the rest of the batch. In your case its one, its simple, you want one gallon at 1.065. I see DME is 45 points per gallon per pound, so : 65 = 45 * X (where X = pounds of DME). X = 65/45 = 1.44 lbs of DME In general terms, the formula would be (OG /Points ) * V (where v = volume to be added in ...


2

I am primarily a one-gallon brewer. I have never adjusted a recipe, so I can't answer the question on AAUs. But I can tell you from experience that you can "scale" dry yeast on pretty much a linear basis. My method: I use the Mr. Malty Pitching Rate Calculator, and then use this $6 digital scale to weigh the dry yeast. I overpitch slightly from Mr. ...


2

There are plenty of online dilution calculators, but if you want a formula, the below was taken from Mechanics of No Sparge Brewing: The Dilution Formula (reference Ray Daniels, Designing Great Beers) Most of the dilution/gravity calculations found in this write up are based on a simple formula that states: Beg Volume * Beg Gravity=End Volume * ...


2

If your brewhouse consitantly achieves 95% just use that setting in your recipe/brew software and it will cascade to the grains allowing you to reduce their wieghts to hit a target OG. This will mainly result in a reduction in the base malt, while keeping most specialty grains close to original weights. Or you can estimate by hand, if a recipe is calculated ...


2

As a general suggestion on recipe formulation, this would be a good starting point: http://homebrewmanual.com/home-brewing-calculations/


2

Yes you scan scale and adjust your recipe to fit your brewhouse efficiency. Programs and apps do this very easily. One simple free Android app is BrewR. I think you would benifiet more from fixing the efficiency issue though. If you feel the poor efficiency is from your kettle and heel/trub. I would suspect that's from hops or other boil adjuncts. IMO a ...


2

Yes It's much easier to apply high efficiency methods in smaller volumes. The biggest gain will be from being able to crush grains to near flour gauges. Allowing much more of the endosperm to have contact with mash water. Small batch BIAB would allow for physical stirring and manipulation to avoid small crush issues experienced in larger volumes. Also it's ...


2

It does apply if the aroma hops have any time or above 175°. Then they will contribute to the isomerized alpha-acid IBU. That said, beer can be made more bitter with a lot of dry hops. But it's not the same as isomerized alpha acids. In my experience this dry hop bitterness fades in a couple weeks.


2

tl;dr version: yes, you are right, there are seasonal variations in a hop's aromatic qualities, and AA variations which necessitate adjusting the quantity of a given hop addition gives rise to even more variation. However, in practice this is usually quite insignificant. If you are concerned that a considerable AA variation requires significant adjustments ...


2

As a general rule, when you are re-sizing recipes you want to keep all ingredients in basically the same proportions. This includes the number of yeast cells. If you do not double the yeast, you will be asking each yeast cell to be doing twice the work, which would tend to affect the performance of the yeast, and therefore the chemical composition of the ...


1

The equipment profile is just used for your Efficiency calculations. Mash efficiency and brew house efficiency. These really have little to do with scaling down a recipe. The only concern would be more rapid boil off with the lesser volume, which can be adjusted with the flame or adding water to correct if you had more than exected evaporation. Set your ...


1

You just had very poor mash efficiency. All the causes and solutions have been covered in other Q&A here. When done correctly you should be able to easily produce 10l of 1.096 wort post boil and dilute to 20l for 1.046 Update: Ran some of your numbers. DP fine, water/grist ratio fine. Looks like you actually got ok mash efficiency but saccharification ...


1

As the other answers say, you can go off the experience of others and use trial and error to dial in a recipe. I agree with them, but I also highly recommend Ray Daniel's "Designing Great Beers" for advice on how to go about formulating your own recipes. Since buying this book in 1998, I have only followed other people's recipes a few times.


1

Short answer: No. There is no way to just look at a list of ingredients, with no quantities, and with great accuracy know how the beer is made, or what those quantities are. The best you can do is take educated guesses based on things like hoppyness, maltyness, sweetness, color, clarity and smell of the beer. But, there is hope, as beer recipes are very ...


1

Well you could reduce all ingredients by 34% to scale the batch, but once you open extract it needs to be used asap. If you have the boil capacity, I would brew the whole batch, ferment what you can, then put the rest in sanitary jugs and refridgerate to be reboiled in the near future. Use the remaining wort for yeast starters or a mini batch. If the ...


1

I have always used black tea stewed for about 30-45 min, and used as my about half of my brewing water, if you want to try with raisins have a look here: http://www.westchesterwinemakers.com/2013/05/31/x-18/


1

For adding things to finished beers it's not too hard. Our local micro does one keg every week of different things that they add to their normal brews. (coffee/vanilla porter, double dry hopped IPA, mango pale ale, tart cherry brown, etc). Most breweries also have a pilot system that's one or two barrels (31 or 72 gallons) that they use for testing recipes ...


1

It very much depends upon how you want to affect the taste - in particular where in the brewing process that change has to happen. Changes in the grist, mash, boil affect the entire batch. Changes in fermentation depends upon how many fermentors the brewery has. Finally there is changes in packaging. But even if your change could be delayed all the way ...


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